It might only be available to lease in limited numbers in only a few areas, but the Honda Fit EV certainly has one thing that's tremendously good about it: an official EPA rating of 118 MPGe and a range of 82 miles. Specifically, the all-electric Fit gets 132/105/118 city/highway/combined MPGe. Honda says the little EV is the most efficient vehicle the EPA has ever tested, but we're not sure about that.

As you can see in the comparison chart Honda released for the Fit EV below, the automaker conveniently forgot to include the Tesla Roadster 2.5, which the EPA said got 119 MPGe.

Honda does say, "the 2013 Honda Fit EV tops all other EV offerings in efficiency ratings, providing the most mileage for your electric dollar," and that Roadster only got 124 MPGe on the city cycle, so maybe there's an asterisk needed somewhere. Or perhaps Honda is comparing the kWh required to go 100 miles (the Fit needs just 29, while the Roadster 2.5 uses 30). Whatever the specifics of the situation are, the Fit EV is one efficient little car, and this makes us doubly sad that Honda is treating it like a compliance car.

Leases will be begin "in select California and Oregon markets during the summer of 2012, followed by an East Coast rollout in 2013." The Fit EV will likely cost $399 a month and have an MSRP of $36,625. Last we heard, Honda only plans on making 1,100 Fit EVs for the U.S. market.

*UPDATE: As we suggested, Honda is using the kWh per 100 miles number for the calculation for "highest efficiency rating." Thus, Honda told AutoblogGreen, the Fit EV compares to the Tesla Roadster 2.5 (kWh per 100 miles, lower is better) this way:
  • Fit EV: City, 26 / Highway, 32 / Combined, 29
  • Roadster 2.5: City, 32 / Highway, 33 / Combined, 30
Thus, Honda says the Fit EV's 20-kWh battery is "much more efficient" than the Roadster's 42-kWh battery pack.



Show full PR text
2013 Honda Fit EV Rated by the EPA at 118 MPGe; Highest Fuel-Efficiency Rating Ever

The 2013 Honda Fit EV tops all other EV offerings in efficiency ratings, providing the most mileage for your electric dollar

TORRANCE, Calif., June 6, 2012 – The 2013 Honda Fit EV, with a combined adjusted Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mile-per-gallon-equivalency rating of 118 MPGe, received the highest fuel-efficiency rating ever given by the EPA. Further, with an unprecedented low consumption rating of just 29 kilowatt hours (kWh) per 100 miles and low EPA rated annual fuel cost of $500, the fun-to-drive 2013 Honda Fit EV can help consumers get more miles for each charging dollar.

With such an efficient drivetrain, the Fit EV's 20-kWh lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery provides the capacity to earn an EPA combined city/highway estimated driving range rating of 82-miles, allowing the Fit EV to surpass the EPA efficiency and range ratings of the Ford Focus Electric (105 MPGe, 76-mile range), Nissan Leaf (99 MPGe, 73-mile range), and Mitsubishi i-MiEV (112 MPGe, 62-mile range). The Fit EV's exceptionally efficient design – encompassing everything from savvy powertrain design, weight-conscious engineering and effective aerodynamics – makes the most of the Fit EV's smaller battery. Additionally, the Fit EV battery can be recharged in less than 3 hours from a low charge indicator illumination point when connected to a 240-volt circuit.

"Just as important as the industry-leading fuel-efficiency and fast recharging time, as a Honda, the 2013 Fit EV will be an absolute kick to drive," said Steve Center, vice president of the American Honda Environmental Business Development Office.

The Fit EV's 92 kilowatt (123 horsepower) coaxial electric motor generates 188 ft-lb of torque, and is teamed to a chassis with a fully-independent suspension and a driver-selectable 3-mode electric drive system adapted from the CR-Z Sport Hybrid.

Honda debuted the 2013 Fit EV at the 2011 Los Angeles Auto Show and announced plans to begin leasing the battery-electric commuter vehicle to customers in select California and Oregon markets during the summer of 2012, followed by an East Coast rollout in 2013.

Honda Environmental Leadership

The Fit EV is a part of Honda's portfolio approach, which includes the development of battery- electric, hydrogen, natural gas, and gasoline-electric powered vehicles, to improve fuel-efficiency and reduce C02 emissions. Honda has led the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) rankings of overall vehicle environmental performance since 2000, and a Honda vehicle has topped the list of America's greenest vehicles, from the America Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), for eleven consecutive years.

In 2006, Honda became the first automaker to announce voluntary CO2 emissions reduction targets for its global fleet of automobile, powersports and power equipment products and its global network of manufacturing plants. Today, the company is striving for even greater reductions in CO2 emissions that contribute to global climate change, while also working to minimize waste, water use and the total environmental footprint of its operations worldwide.

*132/105/118 city/highway/combined miles per gallon of gasoline-equivalent (MPGe) rating; 82 mile combined (city/highway) driving range rating (adjusted). Ratings determined by US EPA. Your MPGe and range will vary depending on driving conditions, how you drive and maintain your vehicle, battery age/condition, and other factors. For additional information about EPA ratings, visit http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/label/learn-more-electric-label.shtml


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 47 Comments
      Dave
      • 2 Years Ago
      It looks great!
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      timber
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should just call it MPKWh or just MPK or something like that. KWh per 100 miles sounds just like the rating we use in Europe (liter per 100 km) To be consistent the USA should use that MPK and we could use that KWh per 100 kms.
        Ryan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @timber
        Because the EPA has a hard on for electric cars, so they post them in MPGe using their own math model to create the values and use it as bragging rights over gasoline and diesel vehicles
      ابوذر ڀرڳڙي
      • 2 Years Ago
      What a useless range.
      Done Deal DR
      • 2 Years Ago
      Its too bad they aren't making this on a wider scale. 80ish mile range is plenty for me and many other people, as a second car. On one hand spending 36K on a fit is ridiculous but on the other you'd make up a lot of that on the back end. Though I'm still envious of my neighbor who has a Chevy Volt and home has a large Solar system. His running costs are nearly free.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Done Deal DR
        I think 150 - 200 miles range will be the turning point of acceptability. Most people fear that contingencies like forgetting to plug in nightly, or power outages, or lack of recharging access will leave them stranded. These are valid points no matter how many miles you NORMALLY drive. I for one often have 100 mile per day errand days although my normal day is around 10 miles. If you have kids and need to lug them around 89 miles may not suffice some days. That alone makes the car a fail.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Done Deal DR
        [blocked]
      IBx27
      • 2 Years Ago
      What that says to me is that all those batteries in that car still does not have one fourth the energy that one gallon of gas contains. The batteries are rated at more than 100mpg-e, but they only go for 3/4 of that, and that’s almost direct transfer of energy from the battery to the motor. Burning gasoline is only 20% efficient, and yet it still goes farther.
        Rob J
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IBx27
        I think you are very confused. What this REALLY does is show how inefficient internal combustion engines are; 1 kWh of electricity is 3,600,000 joules of stored energy 1 gallon of gasoline is 130,000,000 joules of stored energy (got these numbers off Google) So with a 20 kWh battery, you have 26,000,000 joules, still only about a fith as much as a gallon of gas. Except a small car can go about 40 miles with a gallon and this EV can go twice as far with 1/5 the energy! Math! Exciting!
        tump
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IBx27
        What that tells me is that you don't know what a commuter car is. Also, electric cars get HOV lane access by default and that's worth thousands of dollars. Electric cars will be passing you in your gas car (actually, I'll be doing that anyway on a motorcycle between lanes.)
          IBx27
          • 2 Years Ago
          @tump
          I'm talking about the energy density of the batteries. I'm not sure what you're on about.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        snap_understeer_ftw
        • 2 Years Ago
        the voice of reason is always a controversial one.....Most people refuse to see the whole picture when they are blinded by the single MPG number, no matter the original cost for the tech
          Jessica
          • 2 Years Ago
          @snap_understeer_ftw
          Some people are interested in carbon output vs. raw efficiency. An electric car emits less CO2, even if it is charged mostly by coal power plants.
        graphikzking
        • 2 Years Ago
        Of course buying a 3yr old used car would be cheaper than buying a brand new car with the newest type of powertrain. Next up..buying a 2 year old gaming desktop is cheaper than a quad core tablet. Btw 14k miles per year will cost you $35 per month in electric. $414 per year. Gas are $3.30 and 33mpg =$1400 per year. PLUS oil changes and brakes and plugs wires etc.
      sstowes
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sebastian, Seriously, why are you complaining Honda didn't include the Tesla Roadster? That car barely seats two and costs almost 3 times as much as any of the cars on that list. You really think people are cross-shopping any of the above with $100K carbon fiber EV sports cars? I mean, damn, Honda totally forgot to include the Rimac Concept_One or Lightning GT too. Stupid list...
        Sean Flanagan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sstowes
        Not to mention that you can't buy a new Tesla Roadster anymore: http://green.autoblog.com/2011/12/16/this-is-the-last-tesla-roadster/ So with a little wording adjustment, the Fit EV is unquestionably the most efficient vehicle currently on sale. But I suppose that's not what Honda said.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sstowes
        [blocked]
      Car Guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      There is going to be no magic bullet when it comes to battery advancement. Improvements will be slow and incremental.
      Mark
      • 2 Years Ago
      Please, just a little more range. This is to all companies. Give me a real word 100 mile charge and I'm in.
      SpikedLemon
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should come out with an aftermarket kit for a little Honda generator in the back of one of these.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        [blocked]
        Tagbert
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        Or you could mount the generator inside the vehicle. maybe between the front wheels. Or you could buy a Volt?
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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