According to a report in Car and Driver, the refreshed 2013 BMW 7 Series will be offered with diesel power here in the Untied States. The flagship BMW will be powered by the same 3.0-liter turbo-diesel inline-six that's found elsewhere in the Roundel lineup, though as of this moment, it's still unclear what sort of power or fuel economy figures are expected in the 7 Series. Expect the production model to wear either 735d or 740d nomenclature.

For reference, the BMW X5 xDrive35d with this same engine produces 265 horsepower and 425 pound-feet of torque. The all-wheel-drive X5 crossover is able to achieve up to 26 miles per gallon when equipped with the 3.0-liter diesel engine. The 7 Series is indeed a big boy, but we expect it to achieve better fuel economy numbers than the X5.

Car and Driver says that the diesel 7 Series should arrive in about one year's time, where it will compete against the Mercedes-Benz S350 Bluetec and Audi A8 3.0 TDI for diesel-powered luxury supremacy. The rest of the updated 2013 7 Series range goes on sale this summer.


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  • 16 Comments
      wxman
      • 20 Hours Ago
      "...But it also contains more particulates and thus is less 'green' in that way...." This is demonstrably untrue. Gasoline engines produce orders of magnitude more particles than current-technology diesel engines, especially under some common driving conditions (high speed, rapid acceleration), where they approach or even exceed the particle emissions of "old-tech" diesel engines (i.e., no DPF).
      Kevin Gregerson
      • 20 Hours Ago
      Might it be possible? that bmw would bring a more reliable car to the states? Or are they just gonna say the oil in the diesel engine is lifetime or you can change it just at the end of the warranty period? Ever since they went to the longer maintenance periods they've pretty much fallen apart after 60k. Hell that lifetime transmission fluid, we found metal shavings in BMW's after 15k. To make great new car margins they've brought down the entire luxury segment in terms of real market value. This of course has raised the actual value of other luxury brands that actually have a good recommended service interval.
      marcopolo
      • 20 Hours Ago
      @DarylMc Lol, I'm visualising your warm fuzzy feelings about your TDI work van, in King of Queens mode...! :) The diesel BMW will be aimed at the Hire car, Limo market, so I suppose the commercial value of diesel v gasoline makes more sense.
      SVX pearlie
      • 20 Hours Ago
      Can someone explain to me how diesel is "green"? It's just slightly more efficient gasoline, isn't it? Should we get a aflutter over EcoBoost and EcoTec engines? Not to mention SkyActive? What about Direct Ignition? and multip-speed transmissions? Are those incremental technologies "green"? Are they as green as going from carbs to fuel injection, and 2 speeds to 3?
        Spec
        • 20 Hours Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        Yeah, I don't get it at all. I guess you can say it emits less CO2 per mile than gasoline since diesel engines tend to be more efficient. But it also contains more particulates and thus is less 'green' in that way. Diesel is marginally more efficient than gasoline since you tend to get better MPG . . . but whether or not it is more economical depends on the price differential. I've never really seen diesel as being significantly better than gasoline.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 20 Hours Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        Amen, sir.
        Actionable Mango
        • 20 Hours Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        Direct Injection gets the Kia Sorento, a 7-passenger SUV, 32mpg on the highway. When a 3-row SUV gets better gas mileage than a lot cars, that's pretty good. Look at Mazda offerings just a couple of years ago and everything is in the 20's for MPG. Look today at Skyactive lineup, and you'll see 30's. That's pretty good too. In addition to better mileage, CLEAN diesel can be pretty green too, especially if you are using biofuel from recycled sources such as used fryer oil. Maybe everyone has a different definition of green. In my opinion these technologies are incremental steps in the right direction. The vast majority of buyers prefer incremental change and are uncertain about radically different vehicles. Sure, Dan F probably thinks a solar-powered bicycle isn't green enough, but most of us live in the real world.
          marcopolo
          • 20 Hours Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          @ Actionable Mango Everyone loves a happy optimist ! Do you really think there are thousands of backyard, 'fryer oil' biodiesel enthusiasts, queueing up to buy a new BMW 7 series ?
        PR
        • 20 Hours Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        Well, for the record, ABG absolutely does cover EcoBoost and EcoTec and SkyActive stories. And DI, and multi-speed transmissions. The mathematical reality is that even small MPG increases in the worst MPG cars saves more gas than larger improvements in high mpg cars. Another mathematical reality is that it is going to be at least a decade before alternative fuel vehicles even have a chance at starting to displace gassers. So yes, all the things you listed are a move in the right direction in the meantime, and are legitimately green. There are different shades of green. Even pure EV's come in different shades of green, with some pure EV's using less electricity per mile, and taking less energy to produce, etc. If we can get a 7-series driver who would never consider buying a hybrid or an EV/PHEV to get better mpg, that is a good thing. With that said, BMW could make their diesels a number of shades greener if they would certify their engines with B20 biodiesel, and if algae and waste biodiesel were a reality. This stuff takes time.
          SVX pearlie
          • 20 Hours Ago
          @PR
          The US 7 driver isn't getting the diesel for mileage, he's getting it for more torque.
        marcopolo
        • 20 Hours Ago
        @SVX pearlie
        @ SVX pearlie, I concur. How is 'diesel' a newer, more environmentally friendly, renewable fuel, than gasoline? "Excuse me Governor, but we're just going to drill for oil in your pristine UN world heritage offshore maritime nature park , with a pretty risky 4000 metre drilling rig......" "What !!! ??The hell you are , you bunch of @#*%#' ! ..... "Oh, sorry Governor, didn't we mention we're not drilling to make nasty gasoline, only lovely 'clean' diesel ?!" "Phew, that's a relief guy's,..mmmm.... diesel, yeah sure, go right ahead !"
      DarylMc
      • 20 Hours Ago
      Hardly clean but horses for courses I suppose. 7 series diesel would likely have spectacular fuel economy compared to the petrol version and very strong torque. But a bit of a stretch to think it will save your wallet or the environment. Strong torque and low fuel consumtion does give a warm fuzzy feeling though. I'm having a bit of a laugh now because what I consider reasonably strong torque is my TDI work van which does 0-60mph in about 18 seconds. So warm fuzzy feelings may vary :)
      pmpjunkie
      • 20 Hours Ago
      wake me when they bring the electron powered version, Tesla style.....
      Letstakeawalk
      • 20 Hours Ago
      Many have been waiting for BMW to bring over a big diesel, this should do really well.
        PR
        • 20 Hours Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        Well, if by really successful you mean at most a few thousand units. BMW only sells around 10-12,000 7-series units in total in the US every year. So the expectations for "really well" should be pretty low. This big dollar luxury cars just don't have a huge market share in the US.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 20 Hours Ago
          @PR
          No doubt. Of course I meant the big diesel's success would be relative to its overall marketshare.
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