Ford doesn't sell its Mustang in Europe, but that hasn't stopped fans from the UK to Poland from figuring out ways to procure one. The Mustang is playing a part in Ford's "Go Further" ad campaign – which showcases the global portfolio and is aimed at changing perceptions by being discreet with Ford branding – and that gets air time in Europe.

As for featuring a car that Europeans can't buy in its commercials, the company told Autocar, "We are very proud of all these products and are interested to see what European consumers, who may not be familiar with these models, think of them." Ford says it's watching European reaction to "Go Further" and will "carefully examine" what the campaign might highlight as a profitable opportunity.

Ultimately, that's a bit of non-promissory boilerplate that stands for, "We've got a guy on it, we'll let you know if he comes up with anything," but at least it's more official recognition of the Mustang's European favor. Ford's embrace of social media is well established, so if Europeans want the Mustang to show up in Ford delaers over there, now could be the time to beat the Facebook drums even louder.


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  • 42 Comments
      Jimmery
      • 2 Years Ago
      Or how about this... Ford wants to understand what Europeans think of the current Mustang, so when they launch the next one next year, they will know how to market it properly.
      Randall GII
      • 2 Years Ago
      Offering the Mustang with a 2.0L EcoBoost with somewhere around 200-250BHP might sell pretty well in Europe.
        Lachmund
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Randall GII
        yeah, but they should call it the capri then
      Cesar Garcia Jr
      • 2 Years Ago
      As a Chevy fan; they get the Camaro SS and its good enough, but as an American; The Mustang(5.0, Cobra, Boss) is something any American can be proud to say its from here.
      rocketmoose
      • 2 Years Ago
      The next-gen Mustang could well be a very compelling product. A lot of people, at least in the UK, perceive them as cool cars (albeit as compensating for something at the same time - but that's no different to any other decent car, really), so a lighter, more agile platform with new, efficient engines could be a very good seller indeed.
      Nick Allain
      • 2 Years Ago
      You know, I saw this ad and thought - why they are they advertising a car in a land they can't sell in to people who can't buy them? Then I remember that the 2014 mustang is going global. My guess is that they're looking into how Europeans feel about the current gen mustang styling to see how much they can (and can't) get away with. We know that it will be less retro but how much less retro probably hangs in the balance.
      jbm0866
      • 2 Years Ago
      Everyone wants what they can't have....for example I get a tinge of jealousy when I see what Ford/GM divisions in Australia are putting out. Having said that, I can't say for sure I would choose to buy one of those cars over what we already have available..
      Ben Lee
      • 2 Years Ago
      I love Mustangs but the front end still has an unrefined, home-made, aftermarket feel. Its actually a step back from the one its replacing, which wasnt refined either. The designers still hasnt nailed the front end after all these years with these retro Mustangs.
        fragmit50
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ben Lee
        Yes, because the 2005+ Mustang has just been a complete sales flop... Good thing you don't work for Ford.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      timber
      • 2 Years Ago
      I (and everybody that I know) love the Mustang, it's styling (leave Kinetic or whatever they call it to the Focus and the Fiesta) and its V8 engines. But I won't sell well in Europe. Taxes based on CO2 and sometimes (depending on the country) engine capacity will but the price almost in or BMW M3 or Porsche 911 territory. That's exactly what happened with the Camaro that started being offered in my country. Only the V8 Camaro is offered but that's for a good reason. The V6 would also be very expensive and wouldn't be a proper american car. If Ford really wants to sell Mustangs here they would need at least a 2 liter turbo engine and ... a diesel engine (manual transmissions are already taken care of). The ideal engine would be a 2 liter dual turbo diesel with around 200 hp. They also need do improve cabin quality and give it a proper suspension. In the end Ford will probably decide that it isn't worth the effort (and the possibility of annoying US customers the some changes) and do nothing (or sell the current Mustang at small numbers)
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        @timber
        I agree with everything you said, but Ford seems dead set on this "One Ford" initiative. I'm not sold on such a one size fits all approach because no two markets' needs and wants are the same. In many cases, they vary quite drastically, as you pointed out above. They are walking a fine line here, as they run the risk of either alienating North Americans, or pricing most Europeans out of the market. I don't see them taking the "American-ness" out of the Mustang, as that is part of its charm, so I suspect they will keep it geared more to the North American market, but sell it in small numbers in Europe at a much higher price. That, of course, is assuming they follow the "One Ford" philosophy.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        "Ford of Europe left the Capri to rot on the vine sitting on horse & cart suspension in the mid 80's, despite putting IRS on the Sierra and every other hot hatch getting it." But you need to understand that Ford originally intended killing off the Capri with the Cortina in 1982; both were the same car underneath. And while the Sierra ended up using a good number of Cortina V mechanicals in the end because the Probe III development programme essentially ran out of cash, the Capri's cult status in the UK encouraged Ford to continue to sell it while demand continued. By 1984, that demand only existed in the UK and at the point, the entire range was whittled down to just two trim levels, the Laser with the 4-cyl units, and the 280i with the Cologne V6. The latter these days is a definitive collectors item, but the European market in the 1980s was dominated by the hot hatch and Ford saw no business case to modify the Capri or replace it with a new model.
        aatbloke1967
        • 2 Years Ago
        The Puma wasn't a sales flop - Ford killed it off because it wasn't profitable. It was, and remains, one of the best handling small cars ever to come out of Europe. But what you dont seem to take account of in any of your posts bare the forces of a changing market. If you really are au fait with the UK market, you will know that the hot hatch explosion of the late 1970s and early 1980s essentially killed off the small coupe. Ford invested little in the Capri because it couldn't keep up with the demand for the XR2 and XR3.
      superchan7
      • 2 Years Ago
      The American-engined Mustangs would be prohibitively expensive in Europe, but I think Ford wants to know how the muscle-car body style appeals to the Yurpeanz.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        The Wasp
        • 2 Years Ago
        Seriously? I would read your comments if they weren't so long.
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