It's been more than five months since the Twin Cities Assembly Plant in St. Paul, Minnesota went dark. The facility produced Ford vehicles for nearly 100 years before finally being closed as part of ongoing restructuring. The closure coincided with the production of the very last North American Ford Ranger.

As you may recall, that machine is currently in service with Orkin. The website HappyWrenching.com has worked up a video commemorating the plant's final days in operation, and the clip gives us all a look into the atmosphere surrounding the pickup as it rolled off of the assembly line.

Well shot and with plenty of sentimental music, the video gives us yet another reason to miss the old Ranger. Check out the clip for yourself. Bring a hankie.



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  • 152 Comments
      Sgt Beavis
      • 2 Years Ago
      Allowing the death of the American Ranger is Alan Mullaly's single biggest failure since becoming Ford's CEO. Sales were slumping because the product was neglected. Ford really just needed to update the power train create more demand. I'm a Ford guy but I hope the next Chevy Colorado is a huge success. Even though it isn't a true small pickup, it is at least a sign that GM isn't surrendering the segment to Toyota.
        Synthono
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sgt Beavis
        I hope the Colorado manages to revive the segment. I have no interest in a full size truck, and if the Colorado sells well it could get others into the compact market again.
      carnut122
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's a sad day indeed.
      Rich
      • 2 Years Ago
      A friend of mine had a Ranger that was flawless for him for 150,000 miles. He said it had been a great truck but wanted to get rid of it before he started having problems.I bought it from him for $800 and proceeded to drive it another 9 years and put an additional 140,000 miles onthe vehicle without it ever needing a major repair. In short, it was the best value and the most indestructable vehicle that I have ever owned. So sorry to see this oustanding model come to an end!
      powermetal2000
      • 2 Years Ago
      My father still has his '91 Ranger. 250,000+ miles and still going. Built Ford Tough.
        mt1975
        • 2 Years Ago
        @powermetal2000
        Man that is definitely a rarity, my '96 Ranger nickle and dimed me at 144k, my cousin just put $2400.00 for a new set of heads on his 1998 Ranger, with low miles, I know no one without issues with Fords, GMs and Chryslers. Another cousin refuses to drive her 1999 Ranger out of town fearing it will leave her stranded. The tranny went on my 2001 Ford Explorer Sport Trac at 102k miles with all highway miles, JUNK.
      J.it.mak
      • 2 Years Ago
      Rangers are excellent trucks. If Ford focused for attention they could be quite successful with that model.
      nohmadd13a
      • 2 Years Ago
      I own a 2002 EDGE, and love it. Funny how when the greenies are wreckin the industry, Ford discontinues one of the best trucks ever made.
      Barbara Key Hammill
      • 2 Years Ago
      When all of the American car companies are overseas, only people overseas will be able to purchase them. At ANY price, if we aren't working, we aren't buying. Good bye, FORD!
        rreed91184
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Barbara Key Hammill
        but the really strange thing is where are the import companies building their new plants? (Volkswagen,BMW,Mercedes,Hyundai,Toyota Honda and soon Audi) HERE IN AMERICA! if they can build cars here,and make money why can't our car companies
      Kitron
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've owned three different year productions of the Ranger. All were 4wd extented cabs w/auto. They were my mail delivery trucks as a rural mail carrier. I got great service and value from each of them. I'm still driving the last one with 240,000 miles on the first engine, transmission. I can't believe Ford is willing to leave a hole in this part of the mid-size truck market after such a successful product. Big mistake in my opinion.
      Darryl L. Forbes
      • 2 Years Ago
      AS a Ford fan ,and employee at a Ford dealership I can say this. The ranger is a tough as nails truck. The only problem is that Ford neglected this truck. The last serious refreshing was around 1996 or so. I believe that there is still a market for a truck that is smaller than the f150. Many folks don't need a truck that large. Also, if fuel goes to over 4.00 per gallon, Ford will need something smaller.
        rreed91184
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Darryl L. Forbes
        I agree I sold fords for 13 years and it never failed to amaze me how ford could have a great vehicle and screw it up as bad as they could examples 1) probe was supposed to BE the 1987 mustang-where is it now? (over 250,000 letters from mustang fans saved mustang, thank god) 2)killing off Crown Victoria-when you have a virtual monopoly on the police market what the heck are you thinking? 3) all the cars that were good and never got advertised(from 1984-2000 did you ever see a mustang ad?, when was the last time you saw a ranger ad?1984?1987?) 4) abandoning the small truck segment. if toyota could make small trucks here and make money why cant ford. granted at my time with the blue oval I saw my share of awful cars or to be more kind mediocre cars fairmont,tempo,probe,contour and it's twin the mercury mistake but you know what? almost all the carsI sold in the mid eighties got better milage than the cars for is selling today-with carburators! my sister still drives a ranger everyday,a stepside, with the 3.slow liter engine and an automatic and with proper care she'll have it for many more years farewell ranger,Ford done you wrong
      wal5we
      • 2 Years Ago
      There has always been strong demand for the smaller trucks. Many people and small businesses don't need a full size p/u. They stopped making the Rangers so you would be forced to buy a full sized p/u and spend thousands more. Even the japanese companies have slashed their inventories of small trucks and jacked up the prices to the point you're better off buying full size.
      raritanroadmngmt
      • 2 Years Ago
      To All of You Wonderful People... May God Bless You All....
      fatkid1371
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ford has good reason to ditch the Ranger. Small trucks only account for somewhere around 2% of the total truck market. That being said, I have a 2WD '93 Ranger (I think this was the last year it was "refreshed") with an OHV 4.0L and a 5 speed trans with over 310,000 miles on the original drive train. This has by far and away been the most competent vehicle I've come across and it shows no signs of changing. If I could thank Ford personally, I would.
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