• May 25th 2012 at 7:46AM
  • 34
Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger

  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger

  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger

  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger

  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger

  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger
  • Nissan Leaf with DC fast charger

Nissan has installed the first of 400 quick-charging electric-vehicle chargers in Europe that it's planning to deploy during the next few years, the Detroit News reports.

The Japanese automaker, which along with alliance partner Renault is said to be investing more than $5 billion (U.S.) in electric-vehicle and infrastructure development, will install 40 quick chargers each in France and the Netherlands. Once the Dutch chargers are deployed, all of the country's drivers will be within 20 miles of a Nissan quick charger. The chargers use the CHAdeMO standard and can recharge an EV like a Nissan Leaf to 80 percent capacity within 30 minutes.

Last month, Nissan launched a campaign called "The Big Turn On" that uses social media to entice people to compete for free quick chargers. As part of the contest, the automaker is giving away other prizes ranging from tablet computers to Nissan Leafs.

Nissan said in February that it was looking to sell as many as 2,000 DC quick-charging stations in the U.S. within the next two years, according to Green Car Reports. Nissan said last fall that it would be able to sell quick charging stations for as little as $9,900, which is about half the price of a more typical DC quick-charging station.


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  • 34 Comments
      Letstakeawalk
      • 3 Years Ago
      I was speaking to a rep for our local electric co-op, who was displaying a Leaf at our Farmer's Market. He was *very* honest, explaining that in their testing they were getting an average of 72 miles per charge. He also indicated that the company has some reservations about mass-deployment of quick chargers. He said the company was still working out how their infrastructure would handle the demand caused by quick-charging (we have a hydropower base, with nuclear), and pointed out that a few hundred cars charging would be fine, but that larger scale BEV deployment would require "major upgrades". I was amused at first, but then I realized this was the guy they were paying to *promote* BEVs, and here he was explaining the challenges.
        Joeviocoe
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        Did you ask him how many BEVs would need to be owned in that area before 'a few hundred BEVs' would be simultaneously be charging at full Level 3 power? I'm guessing a few hundred THOUSAND BEVs would need to be on the road in that one area before you will see that many charging up with Level 3 at once. Each BEV would only be drawing full power for 30 minutes, then down to a few KW for Level 2. So it is much less likely to overload the power grid. Also, nothing a bank of about 40 or so deep cycle AGM batteries couldn't buffer out. Electricity is a versatile thing. I remember reading something about a study in Japan... when they rolled out a bunch of Chademo chargers. Leaf drivers drove significantly more miles with the added confidence of a safety net... but they weren't using the fast chargers as often as many people thought. It was mainly a peace of mind thing. No offense to the co-op rep... but it is hard to get out of the mindset of central fueling. Fast chargers are not going to be the primary means of charging. Cost is an easy way to ensure this. Charging 40 cents per kwh is still cheaper than gasoline per mile and will ensure that folks only use them when absolutely needed. Hell, if it truly gets to be a problem, set the costs higher than gasoline cars. And people will only use them when really needed. ♦ Just set the cost per kwh based on how you want to set demand... too easy. Of course, there is a balance. Set the price too high and your customer use will drop below a reasonable payback time for the charger purchase and installation.
      Rick
      • 3 Years Ago
      What have we have gotta all move to Holland to be near a charger, its overrun with mad cyclists high on wacky backy. If we all copied Hollands example the auto industry would be dead, 59% of dutch folk use zero emission cycles only to get around everywhere in cities, they probably look on the Leaf as a Hummer that guzzles up all their electric supplies.
      Edge
      • 3 Years Ago
      There is nothing "fast" about 30 minutes. It's a start though, and may very well help people get over "range anxiety", knowing they cannot be stranded, if there are many chargers about, as long as they don't mind going for coffee while recharging.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      If Nissan and Renault had a lighter and more aerodynamic vehicle it would require less battery to do the same range and could thus recharge faster with chademo limits. if we say a car could be twice as efficient as a Leaf it could charge half the pack in about 6 minutes. such would really dampen range anxiety
        Rotation
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Yeah, that's easy to say. Good luck doubling the efficiency.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        You don't need to be very aerodynamic if you are rarely travelling at high speed, and small EV's will be primarily city cars. Compromising on aerodynamics means that packaging can be far more efficient, important in a city car. Having recently looked in some detail at car prices and sales, which are showing that not enough people can afford an electric car as currently designed to make sales take off, the people's car may need some heavy design compromises to provide mobility for most. Although not necessarily built by BMW, mass market motoring may be more on the lines of the Visio M than conventional cars: http://www.thechargingpoint.com/news/BMW-to-lead-low-cost-electric-vehicle-research-project.html If folk who are not relatively wealthy need to travel a long distance they may simply have to catch a bus. Such a solution would at least provide everyday mobility, without any pretensions to replacing the ICE like for like. Weight reduction might follow the path of Toyota's FT-Bh, and use inexpensive materials instead of high tech expensive ones like carbon fibre: http://www.greencarcongress.com/2012/03/ftbh-20120306.html Essentially I am suggesting that if motoring is to remain mass market and not retreat to the privilege of the few, heavy compromises may have to be made.
      HVH20
      • 3 Years Ago
      Anyone can buy a 60kW 600VDC fast charger for a bit over $10k, I don't know why people think its double that.
      Rick
      • 3 Years Ago
      30 minutes, l can cycle to work every day in that time, and cycling would be quicker make me fitter, cheaper, beat the Leaf on time and zero emissions none of those nasty niffs coming out of an electric power station that use fuels.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rick
        The fast-charging will rarely be used. You only use it when you are doing longer trips such as between cities. 98% of charging will be done at night with a non-fast charger.
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      All in all these fast charger will displace .0001% of petrol comsumption and level 1 and 2 (110 volts 12 amp and 220 volts 30 amps )charger will displace .1% of petrol comsumption as it apply only to a minority of small car. Nothing is planned for tractor-trailer trucks, machineries, ships, airplane, tanks, missiles, spaceships, as batteries don't apply for them. Maybe hydrogen can displace 300% of petrol use as it's almost free and non-polluting so total traffic can be multiply by 3 with more airplane for vacation everywhere, more water skiing, long long ride of motorcycle on vacation and on weekends at higher speed, etc.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        " Nothing is planned for tractor-trailer trucks, machineries, ships, airplane, tanks," They get to burn the oil that is no longer being burned by small passengers that become EVs. Hydrogen is almost free? Do you live on Jupiter? It often seems that way. ;-)
      skierpage
      • 3 Years Ago
      "This charger can be made compatible with Renault's AC 43kW fast charging system". That would be good.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Related news: more chargers than electric vehicles in Holland (The Netherlands): Electric cars on the road as per end of April 2012: 1,560 BEV, 785 PHEV / EREV Chargers: 2,850 of which 1,540 public (via a foundation called e-laad, www.e-laad.nl) and the rest privately owned (hotels, individuals) which may or may not be available to the general public. Source: Nederlands Dagblad
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      30 minute to refuel is a long time compare to 5 minutes for gasoline/diesel or hydrogen. Nissan said that their battery was not meant to fast charge. 10 000$ for a quick charger but how much for installation as it take 440 volt and there is only 220 volt max in homes and business so it take a new wiring from electric pole so it will cost 10 000$ more so 20 000$ per fast chargers plus the reserved empty parking space. 5 billions invested, will sales catch-up to this ?
        Anne
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        400 volt is 3 phase 230 you Einstein.
      Aaron Schwarz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good!
      lne937s
      • 3 Years Ago
      BTW. The US has fallen far behind Estonia in EV quick charge infrastructure. Other countries are also moving ahead rapidly. This is a perfect example of what happens when people in the US pander to politically-connected technolical laggards trying to preserve market share by slowing the adoption of new technoligies. The longer this continues the farther the US will fall behind. We need to get our act together and push for as many CHAdeMO chargers in place as soon as possible. http://reports.nissan-global.com/EN/?p=4816
        budfox
        • 3 Years Ago
        @lne937s
        CHAdeMO is history! However I appreciate the comparison of the US and Estonia. LMAO
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