The good news? Alt-fuel vehicle sales will rise during the next few years. The bad news? So will their prices.

Global sales of hybrids, plug-in hybrids, battery-electric vehicles and other electric-drive variants will jump 30 percent this year and will rise fivefold between 2011 and 2017, says a Dallas-based research firm.

Worldwide, low- and zero-emission vehicle sales, which stood at $21.1 billion last year, will reach $27.5 billion in 2012 and then increase to $103.1 billion in 2017, according to MarketsandMarkets.

Meanwhile, the number of vehicles sold will rise to 3.53 million in 2017 from 826,800 last year, which is great until a little long division (or a trip to an Excel file) is performed, revealing that the average price of advanced-powertrain vehicles will be $25,556 to $29,198. Either way, hybrids will continue to be the most commonly purchased alt-fuel vehicle during the next few years, the report says.

So far, Americans appear to be doing their part. Alt-fuel vehicle sales through April were at more than 175,000 units, up almost 40 percent from 2011.
Show full PR text
MarketsandMarkets Global Low (Zero) Emission Vehicle Market Worth $103.13 Billion by 2017

DALLAS, May 25, 2012/PRNewswire/ --
According to a new market research report "Low (Zero) Emission Vehicle Market (2012 - 2017) - By Degree of Hybridization & Type of Traction Battery Used - Global Forecast, Trends & Analysis" published by MarketsandMarkets (http://www.marketsandmarkets.com), the global low emission vehicle market was valued $21.13 billion in 2011 and is expected to grow from $27.45 billion in 2012 to $103.13 billion by 2017 at an estimated CAGR of 30.3% from 2012 to 2017. 826.8 thousand low emission vehicle were shipped on a global level for 2011 and the number is expected to reach 3532.1 thousand units by 2017, at an estimated CAGR of 27.8% from 2012 to 2017.

Browse 105 tables and in-depth TOC on "Low (Zero) Emission Vehicle Market (2012 - 2017) - By Degree of Hybridization & Type of Traction Battery Used - Global Forecast, Trends & Analysis". http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/hybrid-electric-vehicle-hev-battery-solar-powered-market-649.html Early buyers will receive 10% customization on reports.

A hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is a type of hybrid vehicle and electric vehicle that combines a conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) propulsion system with an electric propulsion system. The presence of the electric powertrain is intended to achieve either better fuel economy than a conventional vehicle, or better performance.

The world is dominated by ICE-powered vehicle and enjoying the benefits of advances in technology and mass production; wide support from components manufacturer industries, and availability of talented resources. However, the outcome of this dominance includes faster consumption of global fossil fuel resources and an increasing amount of exhaust emissions such as CO2 and CO in the environment. Given these challenges, governments and automakers are looking for better alternative to ICE-powered vehicle that can reduce the exhaust emission and reduce the dependence on oil, which is the primary fuel to tradition vehicles. That is why the need for low emission vehicle is evolving and is continuously growing. This approach will act as a medium to make automotive industry more environment-friendly, ultimately benefiting the world.

Talking of low emission vehicle [http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/hybrid-electric-vehicle-hev-battery-solar-powered-market-649.html ] market based on degree of hybridization, FHEVs are expected to remain as market leaders during the forecasted period. Market for FHEVs and BEVs will develop at a faster rate due to governments' initiatives to develop charging infrastructure and development in battery technology. Till date, the mass produced FHEV cars have been powered by nickel metal-hydride (NiMH) batteries, which are larger and heavier than lithium ion; for example, battery used in Toyota Prius. For PHEV and BEV, lithium seems to the best option in the years to come; due to its high energy density.

Various low emission vehicle types that are covered in the report are Mild Hybrid Electric Vehicle (MHEV), Full Hybrid Electric Vehicle (FHEV), Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV), and Pure Electric Vehicle (EV or BEV). The report also profiles 15 key low emission vehicle manufacturers, along with 7 key players of the vehicle component manufacturers. The report draws the competitive landscape of low emission vehicle market, providing an in-depth comparative analysis of the technological and marketing strategies the key players are adopting in order to gain an edge over the their competitors.

About MarketsandMarkets
MarketsandMarkets is a global market research and consulting company based in the U.S. We publish strategically analyzed market research reports and serve as a business intelligence partner to Fortune 500 companies across the world.

MarketsandMarkets also provides multi-client reports, company profiles, databases, and custom research services. MarketsandMarkets covers thirteen industry verticals; including advanced materials, automotives and transportation [ http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/automotive-and-transportation-market-research-121.html ], banking and financial services, biotechnology, chemicals, consumer goods, energy and power, food and beverages, industrial automation, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, semiconductor and electronics, and telecommunications and IT.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 43 Comments
      marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      @ Anne, European sales of manual transmissions have been sharply decreasing with the introduction of Japanese small automatic hatchback into the European market. Automatics are very popular with young female drivers, many of whom never learn to drive the more complicated manual as obtaining an automatic only licence is much easier.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd be interested to see statistics on how many of these projections have ever come close to being right
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Funny thing - I read a scientific study on scientific studies. Here is the good part: Most published scientific research papers are wrong, according to a new analysis. Assuming that the new paper is itself correct, problems with experimental and statistical methods mean that there is less than a 50% chance that the results of any randomly chosen scientific paper are true.
      Aaron Schwarz
      • 2 Years Ago
      If that is true, someone better start producing some fat quantities of dysprosium for those motor magnets!
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Car prices will rise over time? Great Scott!
        SVX pearlie
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        Ready for something even scarier? Gas prices will rise even faster than car prices.
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          I just don't know what to believe in anymore!
        Aaron Schwarz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        say it aint so.... inflation, is that you I hear eating away at the value of my cash?
      • 2 Years Ago
      I relish the day when we fossil fuels are called "alt-fuels". Rising car prices? I'm not surprised but I'm not ecstatic either. Of course technology is more advanced, but won't it turn some people off? I know vehicle sales will rise, but won't rise even more if the price is competitive? Juan Miguel Ruiz GreenJoyment.com
      • 2 Years Ago
      It pretty much looks like there's no need to worry about the future of hybrid, plug-in vehicle sales and in general clean tech. To support this statement, I cite again some excerpts here from a Forbes article about an emerging trend, which I think very important and significant for the whole.auto industry: "As Governments Exit, Private Investors Return to Cleantech" (Forbes) http://www.forbes.com/sites/pikeresearch/2012/05/25/as-governments-exit-private-investors-return-to-cleantech/ Excerpts: • At the start of the year we forecast that one of the big trends in 2012 would be the return of the private equity markets to the fuel cell and hydrogen industry.  In fact, this trend has been far larger and is now having an impact on the entire cleantech sector. • The last week has seen an announcement from Goldman Sachs that it plans to invest a $40 billion fund in clean energy... • The Pangaea Ventures Fund will also be targeted at energy storage, energy efficiency technology and energy generation.  In Europe, the United Kingdom’s $5 billion bet, the Green Investment Bank, became a commercial reality... • Series A funding is likely to remain the largest hurdle for cleantech companies, with more and more emphasis being placed on commercial viability of the product, rather than on a concept.  But once through that gate the pool of available investment is growing and the number of companies investing larger. • So what has changed to bring investors back into the sector?  The clear major shift in the last twelve months has been the exit from the market in many countries of government based intervention.  The second factor is the increased number of technologies that now fit into a standard private equity model of a five-year exit strategy.  Fuel cells, wind, and biopower, as well as a range of energy efficiency technologies, now all are strong enough markets to sustain the traditional investment and exit model. If the traditional private investment sector considers the clean tech a profitable market, then there's no need to worry at all.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        "As Governments Exit, Private Investors Return to Cleantech" That sentence is ridiculous and shows a pre-conceived ideological agenda. The ATVM loan program REQUIRED MATCHING PRIVATE FUNDING. It is not like the government was crowding out private investment like the ideologue wants to imply. Quite the opposite, the government program REQUIRED private funding.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          There is nothing even remotely ridiculous in that sentence and you are comparing apples and oranges' The ATVM Loan Program is a $25 billion direct loan program funded by Congress in fall 2008 to provide debt capital to the U.S. automotive industry for the purpose of funding projects that help vehicles manufactured in the U.S. meet higher mileage requirements and lessen U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Thus, it is funded by the U.S. Congress for specific purposes, exclusively for the U.S. automotive industry (better mileage, less dependence on foreign oil). The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. (NYSE: GS) is an American multinational investment banking and securities firm that engages in global investment banking, securities, investment management, and other financial services primarily with institutional clients. Thus, as multinational investment banks usually operate, they are making things internationally for PROFIT and, for that matter, they are making a lot (their total assets: US$ 923 billion (2011). Goldman Sachs is only one of many groups, which are very excited about cleantech now, calling it an emerging opportunity which will be quite large, comparable to the opportunity to technology investments in the 1990s or investing 10 years ago in fast-growing countries like Brazil, Russia, India and China. So. the ATVM Loan Program and the new emerging trend are simply two completely different things.
        marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @krisriantz, It's nice to hear your optimism, and desire to see cleaner energy. However, public relations exercises are like politicians pledges, sincerely meant at the time, but in practice, when all is said and done, far more is said than done ! 'Clean energy" often means 'clean' coal technology, or natural gas expansion. Although such programs are not without some merit, they are not really 'sustainable' energy sources. Mostly private equity for truly 'green' technology is diminishing as capital retreats from the high risk markets of Europe and Asia. This will create upward value in the US dollar making it more difficult for the US to export and repay debt, adversely affect US recovery. Wind power, is only of value in certain locations. Fuel cell technology is highly speculative. Bio-fuels suffer from a lack of viable feedstock. The "clean' tech industry you speak about is usually based on a 'cleaner' type of fossil fuel. You also seemed to skip over the fact that Goldman Sachs 'investment' is over 10 years, and represent a decrease of $800 million. Nor did you factor in that much of it's investment is in LED lighting, etc . $ 4 billion may seem a lot of money to a individual, but to the vast energy industry, it's really a very small amount. I wouldn't get complacent about the development of renewable energy, based on the announcements of a few bankers !
        • 2 Years Ago
        Marco, you have several inaccurate information about this topic. • Marco: " $ 4 billion may seem a lot of money to a individual, but to the vast energy industry, it's really a very small amount." • Reuters: Goldman Sachs Group Inc plans to channel investments totaling $40 billion over the next decade into renewable energy projects, an area the investment bank called one of the biggest profit opportunities since its economists got excited about emerging markets in 2001. So, it is - i.e. Goldman Sachs cleantech investment - actually not $4 billion, but $40 billion, which cannot be called "a very small amount". • Marco: "public relations exercises are like politicians pledges, sincerely meant at the time, but in practice, when all is said and done, far more is said than done !" • Reuters: "Goldman, which plans to announce the new target at its annual meeting on Thursday, already invests in clean technology. In 2011, it helped finance $4.8 billion in clean technology companies globally, and co-invested more than $500 million in that area." So, Goldman already invested $4.8 billion + $500 million in clean technology last year. Said and done. • Marco: "'Clean energy" often means 'clean' coal technology, or natural gas expansion. Although such programs are not without some merit, they are not really 'sustainable' energy sources." • Reuters: "The bank's [Goldman] new $40 billion target applies to investments and financings for solar, wind, hydro, biofuels, biomass conversion, energy efficiency, energy storage, green transportation, efficient materials, LED lighting and transmission. So, all are "sustainable' energy sources." • Marco: "Mostly private equity for truly 'green' technology is diminishing as capital retreats from the high risk markets of Europe and Asia." • Reuters: "Goldman executives said this week that demand for alternative energy sources will grow with global energy demand, and as big manufacturing countries, including China and Brazil, set more aggressive targets for reducing emissions. The bank plans to finance deals... Stuart Bernstein, head of Goldman's clean technology and renewables investment banking group, compared the opportunity to technology investments in the 1990s or investing 10 years ago in fast-growing countries like Brazil, Russia, India and China, for which Goldman economist Jim O'Neill coined the term "BRIC" in 2001. 'This is [I.e. cleantech] another emerging opportunity we think will be quite large', Bernstein said." Just some fact checking.
      Kevin Gregerson
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not as long as they continue launching them with autotragic transmissions. The only limiting factor in EV's today is that the tru automotive enthusiast wants a manual and will simply write off the EV because of that.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        Hey Kevin, guess what, us 5-6 speed rowers are minorities. Also, a transmission is a vestigial organ on an EV. No need to shift when you have maximum torque on hand at all times! I think you'd rather enjoy driving a REAL fast EV, like a Tesla Roadster or something even crazier, if you can find one to test ride. My true-life EV experience is limited to 2 wheels. But my last setup was so powerful ( 8kW peak ) that it would jerk you backwards and make you clamp your cheeks to the seat and learn forward to hang on until about 70% of it's top speed. Like being at 6,000rpm on a high revving turbo car at ALL TIMES. You will not miss shifting. You won't miss visiting the gas station either, i guarantee it. Give EVs a try, dude :)
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Aaron: an electric motor is most efficient at it's peak rpm! Just the opposite of an internal combustion engine! you WANT it at 80% of it's maximum unloaded RPM. LTAW: You have some misconceptions that seem to be based on putzy commuter cars that have *just* enough power to maintain 70-80mph. That is like saying internal combustion engines poop out on the freeway because you drove a couple 4 cylinder cars. Well guess what, an internal combustion engine peters out at the top of it's torque band too. And delivers poor torque from a stop. That's why you need a clutch and multiple gears. You don't need it for an electric at all. If you spec a motor high enough and program the controller correctly, the car will still be ******* you back into the seat beyond 100mph. Adding a transmission reduces your efficiency, and it is not easy to gear an electric either. Your transmission ends up being extremely oversized for the task, due to the torque being delivered at low RPM rather than high RPM. Metal to metal linkage handles more torque the faster it spins. That's a huge problem because your transmission could end up weighing as much as the motor - tons of additional rotating mass that eats your efficiency to make up for a poor powertrain design? yeah, how about no. Size the electric motor, program the controller correctly and you will never once worry about high end torque because you'll have such a wide and strong powerband that you won't even think about gears anymore. Go experience a high powered EV, not a putzy, barely adequate commuter car, and get back to me. Driving a Leaf or Focus EV does not count. Those are like the Civics or Corollas of EVs..
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          "LTAW: You have some misconceptions that seem to be based on putzy commuter cars that have *just* enough power to maintain 70-80mph." Not at all, 2WM. If you notice, it's Tesla's own data that I posted, data from the electric motor in the Roadster - by no means a "putzy commuter car". The torque drops off quickly after around 5000 rpm. By the time the motor is at redline, there's only 50lb/ft of torque. As I pointed out, even Tesla originally wanted to have a two-speed transmission so that they could have a higher top speed, and keep the electric motor closer to its performance peak (around 5000rpm for max torque and hp). The Roadster has an advantage in its bantam weight. It can have relatively low torque and hp at highway speeds because there's not a lot of mass to accelerate. Larger BEVs will lose that advantage, and will require multiple gears to maintain similar acceleration and power curves throughout their driven speed range.
          Aaron Schwarz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Yea, but having the electric motor spinning at its peak RPM for high speed highway cruising does not make sense if a 3 speed transmission can improve real overall efficiency by keeping the electric motor in its most efficient RPM range.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          "No need to shift when you have maximum torque on hand at all times!" This is a myth espoused BEV advocates. Even Tesla initially attempted to use multiple gears in order to supply adequate torque at higher speeds. http://webarchive.teslamotors.com/performance/acceleration_and_torque.php *Instant Torque - not Max Torque at All Speeds* Electric motors do supply prodigious torque at very low RPM - which is why they're so quick off the line in acceleration. However, at a higher RPMs, that torque drops off like a rock. Initial acceleration is fun (*lots*!), but highway-speed acceleration for lane changes and passing and merging into highway traffic is a matter of safety - which is why people like cars with lots of power "on the top end" - exactly where a single-speed electric motor is starting to wimp out. EV makers will eventually develop multi-speed transmissions that can handle that initial torque, and then also allow that motor to drop back into lower RPMs to keep that torque available at higher road speeds.
          Kevin Gregerson
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          In America we are, It's annoying when car shopping. The only reason I still hang onto my first car an escort zx2 is because I've setup the engine the way I like it with 10:1 compression and widened the powerband from 1200 to 5500 with a manual, tweaked suspension, recaro seats and I still average about 28mpg. People don't understand the car until they've driven it then they want to drive it more it pulls even in 5th up a mountain at 50mph. It's the kind of car you want to keep driving through the next hill, corner, mountain pass. I've yet to find anything else like it. The only thing close is the new focus and Mazda for small cars and the GTO, corvette in the bigger cars. The subaru STi and the EVO are the ones that I would choose to replace it just for experience of driving if it wasn't for the gas mileage. I also have an autotragic minivan that handles well, but nowhere what I can do with my first car. I've driven a few EV's and they are fun up to about 40-60mph but the lack of gear is really annoying because it feels like you have no control coming into the corners and need to brake and adjust excessively to keep control.
        skierpage
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        Earth to Kevin, Reality: most drivers aren't automotive enthusiasts, most drivers prefer automatics (90+% of USA car sales, though in Europe is reversed), and a manual is worse than an e-CVT like Toyota's HSD or GM's Voltec at optimally blending engine and motor/regen. Only when 80% of car sales are hybrid and plug-in will the distinct minority that want a manual shifter make a material difference to their sales.
          Kevin Gregerson
          • 2 Years Ago
          @skierpage
          Most drivers aren't auto enthusiasts, True. But most drivers take opinions from auto enthusiasts. How do you think BMW is so successful at such high pricing? Also, having a manual shifter is more about the experience of feeling the road through the car. Selecting the right gear to keep car planted through the corner near the edge of grip. Using throttle lift and maybe a little brake to bring the back end around just at the end so you stay in your lane instead of understeering out. Most of the time, that's not top gear or spinning at 6k rpms.
          Ele Truk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @skierpage
          If you are worried about keeping a car in a corner because of driving near the edge of grip, then you are just driving too damn fast. Seriously, the only place you should be concerned about a car performing at the edge of control is on a racetrack, and you should buy a car for that purpose. There's absolutely no reason for that to be an issue for 99.99% of driving.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        I have learned something new from Kevin. EV's have a thing called an 'autotragic transmission'! Should I be concerned? Or is he just driving by to rub our noses in his superiority. Which is a bit of an odd thing, given that every granny here in Europe drives a stick shift. You'll be able to buy your manually shifted ICE car for at least another 20 years. If you take good care of it, you'll be able to drive it until at least 2050. So don't panic, right?
        Aaron Schwarz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        I am a motoring enthusiast that went hybrid: get a motorcycle if you want to shift while going fast! I wrote a blog posting about how hypermiling a Prius can be as much fun as shifting! http://priusblack.blogspot.com/2012/05/fun-of-boring-and-efficient.html
          Ele Truk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Aaron Schwarz
          Not necessarily for the people behind you. Most people have no clue how much gas they are wasting by driving the way they drive.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        As Skier points out, most people don't care or prefer automatic. And I'm one of the manual transmission snobs but that doesn't dissuade me from EVs, they simply don't need a transmission at all so it would be silly for me to demand one. And even with ICE cars, the automatics are so good these days that they've pretty much eliminated the advantage that manuals had over automatics.
        marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        @Kevin Gregerson Skierpage is right. The world production of cars fitted with automatic transmissions far greater than manuals, for a reason. They are far more popular. In Europe, small cars retained manual transmissions to lower cost and increase performance, however with the lessening of trade barriers and the influx of Japanese models, automatics overwhelmed manuals once again. " tru automotive enthusiasts", constitute such a small and fussy market segment that the few sales lost would be so minuscule as to be unnoticeable !
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Kevin Gregerson
        a manual transmission? In An EV? Uhm.....do EV's even have much in the way of a transmission? I thought they were single gears due to the high torque and really cool nature of the electric engine....?
          Ele Truk
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          For conversions, typically it's better to convert a manual transmission than an automatic. With an automatic transmission it requires the motor be constantly spinning to keep the transmission lubricated and operating, wasting precious battery power. With a manual transmission, you generally leave the car in 2nd gear for in city driving, then once you are on the freeway, you might go to another gear, like 4th or 5th (depending on transmission). All current production EVs have a single speed reduction transmission, because the AC motors are capable of a much wider RPM range. DC motors typically go 0-3600 RPM, AC motors can go 12,000 RPM (Tesla tested theirs to 24,000 RPM for 24 hours).
      Rick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Chinese own most of and have brought up most of the rare earth mines around the world, so its more boom times for Chinese economy? No jumps outside North America or Japan the rest of the world has something called a diesel.
        marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        @Rick. Partly, you are correct. The PRC does possess most of the worlds 'developed' rare earth mining locations. The PRC does consider the supply of rare earth as a strategic resource. The PRC has attempted to purchase most of the supply of rare earths sites around the world in an attempt to corner the market. PRC rare earth mining is economical due to production being a) by-product of other mining, b) environmental and labour practices that would prove unacceptable in the developed world. However, the PRC monopoly has been broken by Swiss/German/US advances in technology. This technology replaces the PRC's advantage with cheap labour and allows the economical, mechanised production of rare earths, (along with on site ore processing) . The capital cost of mining rare earths can now be reduced by 75%. This technology would access rare earths in such places as Alaska and Australia, both of whom possess vast rare earth reserves. The Governments of Australia and the US have policies that block PRC investment, or ownership of rare earth mining. To prevent the West from investing in such technology, the PRC is forced to keep the prices of it's rare earths to a reasonably attractive price and ensure adequate supply. This is not the outcome the PRC expected when Deng Xiaoping boasted "The Middle East has oil, but China has rare earth ! "
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        Most rare earths do come from China but they don't have a monopoly. They are just willing to have such minimal environmental and labor regulations that no one can compete with them. But they'll eventually raise their standards, the cost of transporting the materials will overcome the savings in lower regulations, or someone else will lower their regulations that low if China were to really start having a monopoly or cut off supply.
        Ford Future
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rick
        "Rare earth" minerals are not rare.
          Rick
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ford Future
          A global scarcity of rare earth metals over the next five years could be “a ticking timebomb” for renewables and clean-tech, according to consultancy PwC. Hybrid cars, rechargeable batteries and wind turbines are among the sectors which could be affected by a shortage of these metals, which include cobalt, lithium and platinum, says PwC’s report Minerals and metals scarcity in manufacturing: A ‘ticking time bomb. http://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Renewable-Energy/Rare-Earth-Shortages-A-Ticking-Timebomb-For-Renewables.html Wonder why prices have gone up 6 fold? China will use Rare Earths primary for its own consumption, and will sell you it providing its gonna be "Made in China" in the future.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ford Future
          They are exaggerating. 1) Companies have been figuring out ways to reduce rare earth needs 2) Induction motors that don't use rare earths at all can be built 3) Other people can open up mines elsewhere. The only issue with (3) is that this takes some time. But it will happen . . . and it would be nice to create some jobs in some place other than China.
          Ford Future
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ford Future
          IF China self-Imposes essentially high import tariffs on their resources, on the world will be better off.
      • 2 Years Ago
      My wife wants her next car to be a fossil burner. Looks like splits-ville for this hombre. I'll never buy a gasoline or diesel vehicle again in my lifetime. I've made that commitment so the guzzler we have now had better keep working till EV prices come down a bit (or my wages shoot up a lot).
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        So....you cannot afford a EV due to the price, and, you will divorce the wife if she gets something you can afford. Another example of an open minded person who celebrates diversity, even when he may disagree, because as we ALL KNOW, in this world, nothing is black or white, everything is a beautiful shade of gray! The funny thing is, World Citizen probably actually believes he practices everything in that paragraph, and would be insulted if anyone suggested otherwise. His wife probably looks at him with adoring eyes and thinks he can do no wrong. I pity her for the pain she will feel when her dreams are broken by someone who has so shut his mind down that he can tolerate no disagreement, even from his own wife.
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          Full disclosure - nearly every woman I have dated has been a good lefty, including a girl in Germany who was....wait first it....a member of the Green Party. She was, however, very respectful of my radical right wing beliefs, and never held them against me.
        Ele Truk
        • 2 Years Ago
        So by "Looks like splits-ville for this hombre." do you mean you would rather leave your wife than buy a ICE? Wow,that's commitment!
          marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ele Truk
          @Ele Truk, I suppose, it depends on the sort of wife......;)
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