Chrysler
Group's "Imported from Detroit" ad campaign grabbed top honors Wednesday night in New York City, winning the North American Grand Effie Award as the most effective ad in the nation.

"Imported from Detroit was the Grand Effie winner because they sold the product, the category and the city," said Deborah Sandler, President, Mars Chocolate North American and a Grand Effie jury member, in a news release.

Indeed. The two-minute Super Bowl commercial, titled "Born of Fire", created a huge buzz for the city and for the Chrysler 200. The agencies Wieden+Kennedy and Universal McCann created it and Chrysler capitalized on it.

"The success of this campaign has contributed significantly to the company's sales growth over 2010, and as a result of this success, Chrysler has paid off their government bailout six years early," Chrysler said in its entry.

Other automotive winners at the Effie Awards included Porsche grabbing second place in the automotive category for "How Porsche created new relevance for a revered icon," and Chevrolet taking third for "Chevy Volt, it's more than electric."

Kia also grabbed a third-place honor in the Single Impact Engagement category for its "Not your average slam dunk" commercial.

And for those feeling nostalgic, scroll down and check out the original commercial. It still gives us chills. You can also read more about the Effie Awards in the included press release.


Show full PR text
Wieden+Kennedy and Chrysler's Imported from Detroit wins the Grand Effie at the North American Effie Awards Gala in New York

New York (May 23, 2012) – The 2012 North American Effie Effectiveness Index rankings were revealed tonight at the 44thannual Effie Awards Gala in New York City. Winning an Effie Award has become a global symbol of achievement since 1968, as Effie Worldwide honors marketing ideas that work.

Based on the analysis of Effie Awards competition finalist & winner data from the past year, Procter & Gamble is the most effective advertiser in North America, IBM is the most effective brand, WPP is the most effective advertising holding company and Ogilvy & Mather is the most effective advertising agency network. Ogilvy & Mather's New York office is the most effective individual agency office, while McKinney, based in Durham, North Carolina, is the most effective independently held advertising agency.

Wieden+Kennedy and Chrysler's Imported from Detroit is the Grand Effie winner (best in show) for the 2012 Effie Awards.

The top three most effective advertising holding companies in North America are: WPP, Publicis Groupe and Omnicom. The top five most effective agency networks are Ogilvy & Mather, Leo Burnett Worldwide, Starcom MediaVest Group, BBDO Worldwide and Saatchi & Saatchi. The top five most effective independent agencies in North America are McKinney, Wieden+Kennedy, BBH New York, Droga5 and SYPartners. Procter & Gamble remained the most effective advertiser in North America for the second year in a row. Detailed information on the North American Effie Effectiveness Index rankings (with comparisons to 2011 rankings and filter options such as category and company) can be found on www.effieindex.com.

"The Effie Effectiveness Index has put a spotlight on the industry's top performers, and created a learning tool to help all of us become better marketers," said Matt Seiler, Effie Worldwide Chairman of the Board and Global CEO of IPG Mediabrands.

The North American Grand Effie Award winner was debated hours before the Effie Awards ceremony by the Grand Effie Jury at Bloomberg in New York. Finalists (the top scoring Gold Effie Award winners) included the Grand Effie winner, 4 campaigns from Leo Burnett/Arc Worldwide: Allstate Insurance Company's Mayhem, Kellogg's Special K's What Will You Gain When You Lose? (both co-led with Starcom (SMG), Troy Public Library's Book Burning Party, and IKEA's Moving Day (Leo Burnett/Arc Worldwide Toronto). IKEA had a second contender with its campaign IKEA. The Life Improvement Store, with Ogilvy & Mather and MEC North America. Other Grand Effie finalists for Ogilvy & Mather included Watson for IBM and Truvia® Natural Sweetener's Sweetness Stories. BBH New York and Carat's Say It Without Saying It for Diageo's Johnnie Walker and BBDO New York and AT&T's Convincing Youth Not to Text were also Grand Effie contenders.

The challenge for the Grand Effie winner, according to its entry, "after Chrysler's 2009 bankruptcy, the 200 launched with no loyalty to leverage and no eager buyers waiting to see what was coming. Unfortunately, America had turned its back on American cars. In turn, America turned its back on Detroit. If Chrysler could bring back Detroit, it could take back its rightful place within it. Success required us to keep the public's eye on Chrysler's future – to see the possibility, energy and will-to-win in Chrysler. Chrysler launched "IMPORTED FROM DETROIT", which punctuated every piece of communication that has come from the brand since. The first-ever two-minute commercial in the Super Bowl (featuring Eminem) formed the centerpiece of the campaign. As a result, the effort achieved a PR extravaganza and Chrysler search and sales skyrocketed. The success of this campaign has contributed significantly to the company's sales growth over 2010, and as a result of this success, Chrysler has paid off their government bailout six years early."

"Imported from Detroit was the Grand Effie winner because they sold the product, the category and the city," said Debra Sandler, President, Mars Chocolate North American and a Grand Effie jury member.

"The Chrysler work had a depth of effectiveness that stood out from the rest of the Grand Effie Finalists. They gave that brand its soul back," said another Grand Effie jury member, Jeff Benjamin, CCO, North America, JWT.

A list of gold, silver and bronze winners for the North American Effie Awards can be found on www.effie.org. The remaining Global & regional Effie Effectiveness Index rankings will be announced on June 18, 2012 and will be featured on www.effieindex.com.

Effie Worldwide, in partnership with WARC, launched The Effie Effectiveness Index in 2011 to recognize the architects of the most effective marketing communications ideas from around the world and to educate and promote marketing effectiveness globally. In order to be included in the rankings, North American Effie finalists and winners supplied detailed case studies with challenging goals and significant results that were rigorously evaluated by at least two rounds of industry experts.

About Effie Worldwide
Effie Worldwide stands for effectiveness in marketing communications, spotlighting marketing ideas that work and encouraging thoughtful dialogue about the ever-changing marketing industry. The Effie network works with some of the top research and media organizations worldwide to bring its audience relevant and first-class insights into effective marketing strategy.

The Effie Awards are known by advertisers and agencies globally as the pre-eminent award in the industry, and recognize any and all forms of marketing communication that contribute to a brand's success. Since 1968, winning an Effie has become a global symbol of achievement. Today, Effie celebrates effectiveness worldwide with the Global Effie, the Euro Effie, the Middle East / North Africa Effie and more than 40 national Effie programs. For more details, visit www.effie.org. Follow @effieawards on Twitter for updates on Effie information, programs and news.


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  • 30 Comments
      Lunch
      • 2 Years Ago
      Detroit is a dead town and we all know it. Ah, just FYI, Chrysler is owned by FIAT. U can push the commercial all u want, but we all know the truth about Detroit. They had their day, but it's over.
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Lunch
        What does any of that have to do with these ads being effective? FYI, Fiat owns 58% of Chrysler, and Chrysler's headquartered in Auburn Hills, Michigan, so it's not as cut and dry as you state. It's sad how some of you seem to want Detroit and the domestic auto industry to fail.
      Johnny
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hilarious, considering the current state of Detroit itself. Ironic, considering Chrysler is now owned by a European company.
      EUniqe
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm sorry, isn't detroit supposed to be a bankrupt hole with the crime rate off the scale and NO reason to live there whatsoever? why would i want a car made there? for the name? get over it !!!!
      Ducman69
      • 2 Years Ago
      Chrysler has considerable German and Italian management influence, and considering how some Toyota and Honda vehicles have more domestic parts and are assembled right here in the US, this whole "American patriotism" thing is a joke. My brother is an American engineer working hard and earning for his family right here in Alabama... for Mercedes North America. And the chocolate city is merely another sad example of what happens when any major city experiences "white flight" with crime rates so high you can't legally park your new Chrysler in front of your house due to an inability of law enforcement to even attempt to control vehicle theft, nothing an Eminem commercial is going to fix.
        Steve
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ducman69
        Because a Camry has high NA part content doesn't make Toyota "American". Toyota still imports most of their models. Toyota import the Prius, Prius V, Yaris, Matrix, Rav4, FJ Cruiser, all Scion models, all Lexus models...... Working in the Automotive field as a supplier for most brands. I work with engineers for Chrysler, GM and Ford during R&D in Michigan. When I work with the Japanese companies, we work with their engineers thru email, phone, and meetings in JAPAN. They are not in the USA. I have met with a few American engineers here in the USA during and after launch by they are still surrounded by Japanese engineers that come here. The same goes with the German companies, we have to travel to Germany during the development of the products. They do the R&D out of Germany. Sadly you see buying American products as a joke. It isn't...... Many people don't try to make excuses for themselves and they buy American to support American workers and American engineers.
      • 2 Years Ago
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        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        They hear that enough as it is, so putting it up on a sign on the Fox Theatre would not really change anything. There are is a lot of beautiful, old architecture. Even some of the old buildings, in their neglected states, are awe inspiring.
          Chris
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Chris
          Why the down votes? There is a lot of nice architecture in Detroit. Is that not part of what makes a place "beautiful"? I am guessing you folks that voted me down have never even been there. But hey, what do I know? I am only from there...
        Ducman69
        • 2 Years Ago
        How did Mary's comment go from +9 to -7 in under an hour? Somehow the comments all just reversed their popularity in a vote bomb.
        metrolaserllc
        • 2 Years Ago
        Jonathan Lipton here. Small business owner and former Jaguar driver. As an American and an employer who has lived through the recession of these past few years, I have decided to never again purchase another foreign vehicle. I won't even purchase a car assembled here that has its profits sent back home to Japan. I am putting my money back into our economy, into American workers pockets! With all due respect to Mary's comments, I respectfully submit to folks with those sentiments should push up their sleeves, pitch in and clean it up. It's been a "Heap" since the race riots of 1968. Come on Mary, instead of posting about it on Autoblog, do your community a service, pay it forward, and help Detroit. If a Philly Boy can buy a Lincoln you can do your part, no?
      Willie
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well deserved, that was a great commercial! Speaking as a current Detroit resident, I love this city and I certainly would not want to live in the surrounding suburbs. Detroit has its problems but the city is not some war torn village. I live in a nice middle-class neighborhood full of beautiful brick homes, my house has never been broken into, I've never been shot at, I can read and write, graduated from college, and I have a good job. Guess what, a lot of other Detroiters fall into this same category. What people don't understand about the crime stats in Detroit is that these are not honest, law-abiding tax paying citizens who are getting caught up. These are thugs killing thugs and people who choose to associate around these type of people. Yes I acknowledge that there are times when innocent people are caught up between the violence. But anybody can get a camera and go film the ghetto and interview people with a 4th grade education, that doesn't mean the whole city is made up like that. There are rough areas in all major U.S. cities (FACT). I'm just glad I'm not someone who just sits around and point out everything that's wrong, I'm very active in volunteering and DOING SOMETHING that helps make this a better city. Sorry to go on a rant but I hate reading some of the comments people make about Detroit (who never even been here before).
        Xedicon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Willie
        Good man. I don't live within Detroit itself but I sure spend a lot of time there - you said it best, every city has good and bad.
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Willie
        Well said. Don't worry too much about he haters. Right now, hating Detroit seems to be the "in thing", kind of like how hating Paris Hilton was a few years back. Now, no one ever talks about her. It's the same thing. Eventually, people will get tired of talking about it, and find something else to bitch about.
      turbomonkey2k
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just please don't deport me to detroit.
      Michael Scherping
      • 2 Years Ago
      I grew up having a passion for automobiles - American ones more specificly. I have an entire library about cars and truely believe I missed my calling. Should have gone to school and got a degree in idustrial design and moved to Detroit. Would have been happy with a blue-collar job and work up from there. Someone once said that the car is the closest thing man has ever made to something that is alive. This city is the birthplace of the assembly line, is it not? American manufacturing and the kick-start to the industrial revolution began here. It was once the hearbeat of America and the trendsetters of automobile design in it's heyday. I think everyone should want to see it succeed. And I think it's coming back. I've never been there yet but I intend to make it to a Detroit Auto Show one of these years.
      Chris
      • 2 Years Ago
      I can't say I am totally surprised by this because the ad featuring Super Bowl ad Eminem was probably the most captivating car commercial I have ever seen. Regardless of what you think of Chrysler, Detroit, or the Big 3, one has to admit that the ad was quite an attention getter. Needless to say, it served its purpose.
      teamplayers99
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was given a 200 as a rental the other day. It was rolling apathy, nothing special.
      Tom Biddlecombe
      • 2 Years Ago
      I still get goosebumps every time I watch this! I love Detroit!
      • 2 Years Ago
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