Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept
  • Nissan e-NV200 Concept

There are two ways automakers can go when producing a vehicle with electric propulsion – be it a hybrid or an outright EV: make it look the same as any other car, or make it stand out. Like Toyota (for example) did with the Prius, Nissan made the Leaf look (for better or worse) unlike a conventional sedan. But while Toyota answered the call for more space with the equally "distinctive" Prius V, Nissan has gone a different route in producing a bigger brother for the Leaf.

That route is called the e-NV200, pictured above in concept form. And while the nose, unique shade of blue and electric powertrain are conceptually borrowed from the Leaf, the rest is nearly identical to the existing NV200 van that is being rolled out in New York as the city's new taxi of choice.

Nissan has just announced the production of the e-NV200, set to start next year at the same plant in Barcelona, Spain, as the conventionally-powered NV200. As a result, Nissan will hire 700 more workers at the plant and invest some €100 million (U.S. $126 million at today's exchange rates). Details like projected cost and annual capacity are not to be found in the press release below, but Nissan does say the electric van will be built starting some time in fiscal year 2013. That means some time before the end of March 2014.
Show full PR text
NISSAN TO PRODUCE 100% ELECTRIC VAN IN BARCELONA
- Electric variant of NV200 to launch in 2013-


- All-new 100% electric e-NV200 to enter production in FY13
- Nissan's second all-electric vehicle allocated to Barcelona Plant
- Major project investment by Nissan of €100 mn in Spain
- More than 700 jobs to be created at Nissan and its Spanish suppliers
- Multi-use vehicle providing families and businesses with unique driving experience
- Interior functionality and cargo capacity similar to existing NV200 with class-leading running costs

BARCELONA, Spain (May 23, 2012) - Today Nissan announced that a 100% electric compact van, the e-NV200, will go into production at its Barcelona plant in the 2013 Financial Year.

The new model will be based on the existing award-winning NV200 currently produced at the plant and will be an important and innovative addition to Nissan's global range of light commercial vehicles (LCV's).

e-NV200 will become Nissan's second all-electric vehicle (EV) following the launch of the multi-award winning Nissan LEAF in 2010, underlining Nissan's long-term commitment to zero emission mobility.

The new model, which represents €100 million investment by Nissan in Spain, is expected to create around 700 new jobs at the plant and throughout its local supplier base.

As the sole producer of e-NV200, Barcelona will supply world markets highlighting the growing competitiveness of Nissan's Spanish industrial operations. Last week a new medium duty truck was allocated to Nissan's Avila Plant in central Spain.

e-NV200 will provide both businesses and families with functional and roomy interior space and will retain the host of innovative and practical features of the current NV200 line up combined with the most advanced powertrain components of the Nissan LEAF.

This will deliver a driving range similar to the Nissan LEAF on a single charge and similar performance, together with best in class running and maintenance costs.

Andy Palmer, Nissan Executive Vice President, said: "e-NV200 represents a genuine breakthrough in commercial vehicles and further underlines Nissan's leadership within the electric vehicle segment.

"The new model will offer all the spaciousness, versatility and practicality of a traditionally powered compact van, but with zero CO2 emission at the point of use and also provide an outstanding driving experience that is unique to EV's.

"Crucially, it will also offer class-leading running and maintenance costs, which makes it an exceptionally attractive proposition to both businesses and families."

e-NV200 will also make a significant contribution to Nissan's aim of becoming the world's largest LCV manufacturer by 2016 as a key pillar of the Nissan Power 88 mid-term plan.

Last year Nissan achieved an historic milestone of selling more than one million LCV's worldwide in a single year.

Andy Palmer added: "e-NV200 represents a bold and innovative addition to our commercial vehicle range, which is already one of the broadest of any manufacturer.

"I would like to thank the Spanish and Catalonian Government for their continued support of Nissan in Spain, and congratulate the Barcelona workforce for earning the right to produce what will be an extremely important model for Nissan globally."

The current NV200 line up has already sold around 100,000 units. Its popularity led it to be chosen as the next generation New York City 'Taxi of Tomorrow' following a rigorous selection process.

Currently, intensive evaluations of prototype NV200-based electric vehicles are being carried out in Europe. Trials will continue in coming months in order to provide real-world feedback from the most demanding usage. Feedback will help Nissan to fulfill exact customer requirements ahead of the start of production expected in FY13.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      Ryan
      • 2 Years Ago
      What does it look like in a normal color like grey or white?
        islandboy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Here ya go! An all electric NV200 panel van in FedEx livery: http://green.autoblog.com/2011/12/18/fedex-to-trial-the-nissan-nv200-ev-prototype-in-london/
      PaloAltoWorldView
      • 2 Years Ago
      This all-electric Nissan min-minivan will be a success, but why on Earth manufacture it in SPAIN? Why not Tennessee?
      PaloAltoWorldView
      • 2 Years Ago
      This all-electric Nissan min-minivan will be a success, but why on Earth manufacture it in SPAIN? Why not Tennessee?
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm surprised they are building this is Europe instead of the US. Europe already has the excellent Kangoo ZE, which will do everything this does, so they will only be splitting the market, whilst there is nothing at all in the US.
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      'Andy Palmer, Nissan’s Executive Vice President told us: “The technology for wireless charging is fairly simple really, and probably not much more than a year away. The problem is it only delivers a slow standard mains charge – fast-charging wirelessly is a little more tricky,” http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/news/autoexpressnews/282778/nissans_ev_plan.html#ixzz1vmJ6EPqj
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      Love Nissan's approach to electric. But their entire design department has needed to be fired since the late 1990's. Upside: their cars being this ugly is a great theft deterrent. If you want something so ugly that nobody will steal it, Nissan is your brand.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Heh. I actually bought my Nissans because they were not theft targets. Great powertrains, good specs, and very reliable, but even the ricer guys won't bother stealing them because they want a Toyota or Honda. I'm only half joking about the theft deterrent part, lol
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Interesting point about theft deterrence . . . buying an EV would be theft deterrent. Not a big market for parts, how far are you going to get before the charge runs out, and do you have a charger to charge it up after you stole it!
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Yeah, I gotta say it is an amazingly ugly vehicle. But that never bothers me much. I'm into utility not aesthetics.
      EZEE
      • 2 Years Ago
      The obvious market for this thing would be as a small cargo van for use by businesses in cities, where routes and daily mileage are known. The Transit Connect was a good idea, but the eye popping price kept it from being viable. There is a huge market for this sort of vehicle. Any city where there are deliveries to be made over set areas. Europe would be huge for this all over, with use in more densely populated American cities as well. Build it quickly.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        Indeed! If they sell this for close to the same price as the Leaf and you get a tax-credit for it, it could become very popular among any business that does small local deliveries. You get a tax-credit, your fuel price drops to near zero, you get a very large depreciation deduction, your maintenance costs drop, and no one is going steal it. I would think these would become very popular. Just a little bit of consumer education needed.
      Marco Polo
      • 2 Years Ago
      @Dave Mart, Dave, I really like the small Kangoo van and would be baffled if it wasn't successful, especially in the UK. Like you, I'm a little puzzled as to why Nissan would try to compete in the same market niche, as Renault and ignore the far more lucrative US market. The real EV Van competition may come from ROC EV Van manufacturers. The provincial and national governments of the ROC (Taiwan) aggressively support these vehicles as part of an expanded export drive. The Luxgen 7 EV, seven seat people-mover, is an excellent vehicle.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        @Marco: See the thread: http://green.autoblog.com/2012/05/24/plug-in-vehicle-drivers-often-get-lower-insurance-rates/ where down the bottom I link to several papers showing the squeeze on French, and European, car buyers, with fewer and fewer people can afford a new car of any sort, and the market for premium vehicles has really taken a hit, except at the very top end. They refer to this as anti-Fordism, where Henry Ford paid his workers enough so that they could afford to buy what they built, so creating the huge US middle class and ensuring demand. The middle is now severely squeezed, with production of the cheapest cars going East, and south, and the increasing numbers of relatively poorly paid workers in the developed countries unable to afford cars at ever rising prices. The high sales of the Twizy show this effect perhaps, although they will also be influenced by French quadracycle regulations, so that youths can drive them without a full license. We will see what happens with the Zoe, but sales for electric vehicles are very disappointing everywhere, there is no question about that. Maybe most folk will have to lower their sights, and something like the the Visio M will be most people's mobility solution: http://www.thechargingpoint.com/news/BMW-to-lead-low-cost-electric-vehicle-research-project.html At least it has two seats, side by side, unlike the Twizy. BTW, I don't know if you caught my post, but I clarified with Renault finance that you can, if you insist, hand back the battery and keep the car if it is fully paid up. Both the BMS and the connections mean that as long as someone else makes them it should be possible to fit another battery. Remaining questions include how you sell a car with a leased battery, even assuming that the lease on both expires at the same time, and what happens to the battery pack if the car is a write-off but not the pack - do you have to pay up the rest of the lease? I have not pursued it as I don't intend to buy one, but here is the link where enquiries can be made to clarify on the web: http://www.renault.co.uk/contact/customerservices.aspx?enquirytype=CarRange To be honest, I am a bit down about the poor sales everywhere, and the problems for most folk in financing a new car. I suppose that is where Renault's battery leasing program may come in, as most people are not in your position and would have problems raising the money for an electric car with batteries included. BTW, the insured cost of the 22kwh pack in the Kangoo ZE is £7,500, which of course does not have VAT as it is for a commercial vehicle. So they are basing their hire charges on a battery costing $548 kwh, or at least insured for that. I reckon my estimate of $400 kwh for the actual production cost to Renault/Nissan looks pretty good, although they may only hit that with volume.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Cheers Marco. I am actually not a cheer leader for Renault, but at the time they seemed to have a serious cost advantage against the Nissan price. Tough times also mean that the 'never never' may be the only way of getting consumer goods. On a more intellectual note, I doubt that Renault have worked out all the ins and outs of leasing, and part of my point which I do not believe I ever made entirely explicit was that sometimes deals are to be had, and one can slip in between the cracks of the various big company offers to get a surprisingly good deal. It was never my intention to argue that leasing per se is better than buying outright, just that sometimes one can get a good promotional deal. Superficially the leases on the Volt and the Leaf in the US seem to fall into that category. If you find out any more information please share. My guess is that Renault themselves do not really know, and have not worked out all the implications of battery leasing.
          Marco Polo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @ DaveMart, The current uncertain economic times are certainly not helpful to marketing new cars, at least in Europe ! From my enquiries with Renault finance I received a number of ambiguous and confused answers concerting battery surrender. Of course you can hand the battery back at the termination of the lease, the law requires such a condition, or it wouldn't be a 'lease' ! But the issue of residual, and the terms by which you surrender the lease are very complex. If the battery costs Renault approx, £ 7000, and Renault leases it for £ 80 per month over 36 months, (£ 2880), then Renault is owed £ 4120 + three years interest and lease costs, say, £ 6300. Now there's only four ways Renault can threat this cost. (a) Demanding a residual/ surrender payment of £ 6300. (b) Try to sell a used battery pack for 90% the cost of a new battery. (c) Subsidise the loss of 30% of the total vehicles purchase cost. (d) Gamble that there is no other battery, available and the owner will be forced to continue the lease for the life of the car. Obviously (b) is absurd ! (c) is an unsustainable business model, and would contravene most anti-dumping legislation. That leaves only (a) , or (d), unless you have another explanation ? Fitting a generic battery would void the Renault warranty, and certainly lower the resale price. Thank you for the Renault contact link, but access to the enquiry process is only available from the UK. I will get our London office to pursue my enquiry, and post the result.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Postal offices world-wide would be wise to look into buying this vehicle in bulk. With ever increasing oil prices, this vehicle makes a great hedge against oil prices and can easily handle typical delivery routes. And it is from a major-manufacturer and it shares parts with the existing Leaf.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        And since most of their distance is traveled at low speeds, maximum range is achieved. Nissan could easily custom 'tune' the vehicle for continual stop/go; maximize energy recovery (regen) and reduce wear on the brakes. It is the ideal scenario for postal service transportation.
      Actionable Mango
      • 2 Years Ago
      Clearly Nissan is doing a lot of things right. Clearly styling is not one of those things.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        The front looks like a buck-toothed guy with his mouth open. Kinda like 'Mater from the Pixar movie Cars.
          Dave D
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Maybe Mater's evil twin.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Mater's long lost Japanese cousin. Complete with 1940's Japanese stereotype look.
      Nate22
      • 2 Years Ago
      I actually think it looks fine. Thank goodness they got rid of the bug-eyed covers on the headlamps.
        Anne
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nate22
        Are you aware that these actually do serve a purpose?
      Anderlan
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was down on NYC for not finding a company to give them a hybrid drive train on the new cabs (because all these things do is sit in traffic or crawl under 20mph, so hybrid would equal huge fuel savings), but now I'm like, "hmm..."
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Anderlan
        Yeah, I suspect Nissan told Bloomberg about the electric version. I think they are going to do a CNG version too which is also pretty good since they have less emissions and natural gas is cheap these days.
        throwback
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Anderlan
        I think hybrids are a better choice. While taxis do a lot of sitting, they also use the A/C and heater a lot. That would kill the batteries in the Winter and Summer.
        Turbo Froggy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Anderlan
        A few stratigically placed DCFCs around NYC and at each Taxi company could electrify an entire fleet of cabs in NYC. For basically the cost of running a Crown Vic for 1 year worth of gas would pay for a couple e-NV200 cabs and a fast charger per cab operator.
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