Frenemies Ford and General Motors have taken to cyberspace for a little verbal sparing, trading snarky shots this week over which company is more likeable on Facebook.

GM set itself up Tuesday after news broke that the carmaker decided not to spend $10 million on Facebook advertising the same week the social media juggernaut prepares for its initial public offering expected to raise $100 billion dollars.

Ford used the opportunity to tweak its crosstown rival, tweeting: "It's all about the execution. Our Facebook ads are effective when strategically combined with engaging content & innovation."

GM couldn't leave that alone, going onto its Facebook page, "Just wanted to let our millions of Facebook fans know, we're still here, and we 'like' you back!"

Both carmakers will continue to use Facebook, where both have millions of followers of their brands and vehicles. And, really, they are both right.

Ford has done an extremely good job incorporating Facebook into its marketing strategy. When it came time to launch the new Ford Explorer, it did it through Facebook reaching millions of people.

GM has determined its money will be better spent in other areas. A recent Associated Press-CNBC poll showing more than half of all Facebook users never click on sponsored ads and only 12 percent said they felt comfortable to buy anything over Facebook. Google, The Wall Street Journal points out, is much more effective.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      Mike
      • 2 Years Ago
      “Ford has done an extremely good job incorporating Facebook into its marketing strategy. When it came time to launch the new Ford Explorer, it did it through Facebook reaching millions of people.” To be clear, the Explorer was revealed as free content for fans of Ford. What GM decided not to do was pay for advertising (the little ads on the right side of your page). Many advertisers have questioned the value of these ads (return on investment), but most feel that it is safer to be a paid participant with the king of all social media than not.
        Lemon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Mike
        Thank you, at least someone else here understands
      AlphaGnome
      • 2 Years Ago
      How does one determine the value of Facebook advertising? For instance, I am a fan of the Fiesta and the Focus ST on Facebook, but I have no intention of purchasing either of the mentioned. I was also a fan of the Explorer briefly when they were supposedly going to give one away. Do they judge the success by the number of fans or likes or the number of vehicle sales? I'd be willing to bet I'm not alone in this and that perhaps 25% (being incredibly optimistic here) of those fans have actually resulted in new Ford customers...
      DOlogunde
      • 2 Years Ago
      All I know is that I've never clicked on a single Facebook ad. I'd say that the brand pages hold more value to me, as I have visited a few (mostly for deals though).
      Lemon
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've never clicked on a facebook ad. I think the company's profile is a lot more effective, especially when they add pictures/videos that can be shared by other users.... and that is all free. Hopefully they're reallocating that marketing money to racing programs!
      2012 ZR1
      • 2 Years Ago
      The only Fords I llke are Mustangs & GT40s & antiques; the rest: meh.
      6speed
      • 2 Years Ago
      Um, wouldn't exactly call that a "Twitterfight". Sorry it's a slow news day?
      Jason
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ahh, the irony of debating Facebook advertising value on ~Twitter~. That says something there... The next thing is always just around the corner. Facebook is great but the valuation of it at this point is a joke. If it's not, our privacy rights will be how we pay for it. Which do you want to be true?
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      This: http://pineconeattack.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/ohsnap.gif
      Fair Isle
      • 2 Years Ago
      To summarize: GM reevaluated yet another one of their questionable advertising strategies. Ford, having made somewhat more well-advised product and advertising decisions, decided to passive-aggressively rub it in GM's face. GM attempted to save face by not directly addressing Ford's content. I'd love to buy an American car but I seriously question the maturity and values of the upper-management of large American car companies (in comparison to many foreign companies); honestly it shows in the cars that these companies produce.
        AlphaGnome
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Fair Isle
        "It shows in the cars that these companies produce" Really? Perhaps it's not a bad thing to let your hair down a bit.. If you aren't allowed to have a little fun, you end up like Honda or worse, Toyota. That maturity level you speak of (and values for that matter) are responsible for products like the Camaro, Mustang, Corvette, Sonic, Focus ST, etc...
          Fair Isle
          • 2 Years Ago
          @AlphaGnome
          In response to your comment about the Camaro, Mustang, etc.; just think about the transformation those cars have undergone since the 90s. All of those cars were no where near as competitive with their foreign counterparts until American companies stopped making incremental upgrades to existing models and instead, created cars that were fundamentally different. When I say "maturity" and "values", I'm referring to how well companies identify/meet consumer wants and needs as evidenced by the business decisions they make. I see American automakers improving and that's always good to see but I still feel like in terms of making good business decisions, they're a step or more behind much of their foreign competition.
        Julius
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Fair Isle
        P.S.... don't think the imports are above this. Nissan took digs at Toyota and Honda a while ago, noting that they had cars on-hand while the others did not. The fact that those two didn't have cars ready because of the tsunami didn't enter the ad...
      Toneron
      • 2 Years Ago
      Typically government bureaus such as GM are poor at execution and low on engaging content and innovation.
      mapoftazifosho
      • 2 Years Ago
      GM's timing on this announcement is no coincidence...this feels like sour grapes from a big old company that still doesn't get this whole internet "fad" This is embarrassing for them on so many levels...
      Big Squid
      • 2 Years Ago
      I hate GM. That said, I think they're right about this. The "Fake book" fad has peaked, and there is no way that flood tide of investors are going to make their money back. People are starting to abandon Facebook over its privacy policies, and because they are beginning to realize that facebook "friends" are not and there is no substitute for real human interaction.
        Lemon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Big Squid
        Someone's feeling angry. I moved out of state and find that facebook is a great way to stay in touch with friends from back home. I don't think facebook is a fad that is going to die.
    • Load More Comments