We see some fairly radical machinery come up for sale on occasion, but few creations manage to raise our eyebrows so high as Project Sea Lion. Created to nab amphibious land speed record, the machine uses a Mazda 13b rotary engine for propulsion, and its creator says the drivetrain is good enough to launch the vehicle to 180 miles per hour if there's enough roadway. Given that the current record sits at 125 mph, the Sea Lion should have no problem nabbing that title.

Top speed on the water may be a bit more cumbersome, however. The quickest amphibious vehicle can get to 60 mph right now, and Sea Lion's builder says the creation will need more horsepower to make that happen.

He suggests a Renesis conversion. We tend to agree.

Made from tig-welded aluminum and a variety of CNC-machined components, the car comes only with a bill of sale. That means we can forget all about driving/floating this thing to work. If you like what you see and what to give the amphibious land speed record a go for yourself, Project Sea Lion is for sale over at Fantasy Junction for the low price of $259,500. Scroll down for a quick video and be sure to check out Fantasy Junction for more details and photos.



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      jonnybimmer
      • 2 Years Ago
      That long front end is a bit crazy for the road, and from the looks of it, a huge hinderance for visibility when it's in the water. Strange music choice for the video though
      cutnshotbiker
      • 2 Years Ago
      retarded
      jayss2k07
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's probably neither a good car nor a good boat.
      Murad
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was going to price out the cost of an RX8, a full size pickup truck and a little speedboat. But then I saw this thing.
        Murad
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Murad
        and of course a little trailer to carry the boat.
      waltzon
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't get these things. I can buy the case for military amphibious assault craft, but for a pleasure vehicle, why? Inevitable high cost, packaging, power, reliability, and driveability compromises occur. How many situations really call for this type of transport? Practicality concerns aside, what is the fun of having a half-million-dollar car which can most likely be bested on land by a $30,000 nissan (or whatever other reasonably performing volume car you wish to substitute) and on water by a $10,000 PWC? I just don't get it. Never have. Even the Rinspeed Squba was an enigma to me, and I love diving and submersibles.
      sataniko
      • 2 Years Ago
      Amazingly stupid!!!!
      waetherman
      • 2 Years Ago
      It occurs to me that the fundemental problem with these aquatic cars is that on the road, the top portion of the car is the bit that has to cut through the wind, while on the water it's the bottom part. As a result, these things usually have ungainly undercarriages or have to go through some kind of complex transformation in order to go from land to sea. Instead of all that, perhaps someone should just make a car that flips over. That seems like it would be a lot simpler than going through all these contortions.
        jonnybimmer
        • 2 Years Ago
        @waetherman
        The drivetrain would likely need to flip too, as generally speaking most ICM's don't do well upside down, unless you were to perhaps used a boxer motor with a custom oil system. Then the way one enters the vehicle would have to be unique, as you'd need ways to enter and exit the vehicle on both land and water, but you wouldn't want windows or doors to be part of the hull. And then there's the whole issue of how one flips it before or after it has entered the water... Basically, there's a lot with a car or boat that would have issues when considering operating them upside down. If someone could build a motorized "dolphin" that can jump out of the water, I'm sure someone can build a car that flips to become a boat, but I guarantee it won't be a simple or easy process to engineer.
      Making11s
      • 2 Years Ago
      How delightfully absurd.
      Ben Lambert
      • 2 Years Ago
      Odd. And very much so.