BMW
, Ford, General Motors and Volkswagen are among the eight U.S. and German automakers that will demonstrate a single-port fast-charging system for electric vehicles at the Electric Vehicle Symposium 26 (EV26) in Los Angeles starting next week.

Audi, Chrysler, Mercedes-Benz parent Daimler and Porsche will also show off the so-called DC-fast system, which will be able to recharge most battery-electric vehicles in as little as 15 minutes.

With a combination AC and DC charging capabilities, the DC-fast system is supposed to start sales by the end of the year and will enable U.S. and German plug-ins to be able to be recharged at most public charging stations while also accommodating high-powered fast-charging stations. The International Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has officially tapped the system as the standard for fast-charging.

Electric-vehicle proponents consider the establishment of a fast-charging standard to be an important key to plug-in vehicle adoption because the availability of publicly accessible fast chargers that can recharge a vehicle in minutes instead of hours makes range anxiety a moot point. Pike Research said last year that annual revenue generated by makers of electric-vehicle charging equipment will increase more than tenfold between 2011 and 2017 to about $4.3 billion.

Still, the fast-charging issue is far from settled because a separate fast-charging standard – CHAdeMO – has been proposed by the Japanese automotive industry. Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi and Subaru parent Fuji Heavy Industries are all partners in the CHAdeMO Association.
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Global Automakers to Demo EV Fast Charging at EVS26
Combined Charging System facilitates both AC as well as DC fast-charging from a single inlet port

Eight global automakers to participate in charging display and will demo the standardized single-port DC-fast charging technology
The system will optimize customer ease of use and will accelerate more affordable deployment of electrified vehicles and charging infrastructure
The Society of International Engineers has chosen the single-port fast charging method as its standard for fast charging and the European manufacturing association (ACEA) has endorsed harmonization for all vehicle types
Chargers will be available commercially as of the end of 2012 and vehicles using the technology will be available starting 2013

Los Angeles, CA – May 3, 2012... Global automakers from the United States and Germany will demonstrate fast-charging technology that will enable the recharging of most electrified vehicles with compatible systems in as little as 15-20 minutes.
Audi, BMW, Chrysler, Daimler, Ford, General Motors, Porsche and Volkswagen have agreed to support a harmonized single-port fast charging approach – called DC-fast charging with a Combined Charging System – for use on electric vehicles in Europe and the United States. Live charging demonstrations will be conducted during the Electric Vehicle Symposium 26 (EVS26) May 6-9.
The combined charging system integrates one-phase AC-charging, fast three-phase AC-charging, DC-charging at home and ultra-fast DC-charging at public stations into one vehicle inlet. This will allow customers to charge at most existing charging stations regardless of power source and may speed more affordable adoption of a standardized infrastructure.
The International Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has chosen the Combined Charging System as the fast-charging methodology for a standard that incrementally extends the existing Type 1-based AC-charging. The standard is to be officially published this summer. ACEA, the European association of vehicle manufacturers has also selected the Combined Charging System as its AC/DC-charging interface for all new vehicle types in Europe beginning in 2017.
The charging system design was based on the collaborative review and analysis of existing charging strategies, the ergonomics of the connector and preferences of U.S. and European customers. The Combined Charging System was developed for all international vehicle markets and creates a uniform standard with identical electrical systems, charge controllers, package dimensions and safety mechanisms.
The system maximizes capability for integration with future smart grid developments through common broadband communication methods regardless of the global location of the charging system. The combined charging approach will reduce development and infrastructure complexity, improve charging reliability, reduce the total cost-of-ownership for end customers and provide low maintenance costs.
Commercially available combined charging stations are projected to be available later this year. All committed OEMs have vehicles in development which will use the Combined Charging System. The first vehicles to use this system will reach the market in 2013.

BMW ActiveE and project i - research and development of tomorrow's mobility.
The BMW ActiveE is the BMW Group's next step towards an emission-free, mass-produced electric vehicle. Within the framework of project i, the BMW Group is carrying out research and development work on the development of electrically powered vehicles. The next step will be the BMW i3 due to launch in 2013. It will be designed to meet the demands of a sustainable mobility solution for congested urban areas. For this reason, the drive components and battery technology that will be used in the BMW i3 are being tested now in the BMW ActiveE.
The recent field test involving more than 600 MINI E cars, including 450 in the US, have provided vital knowledge ab


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  • 22 Comments
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 2 Years Ago
      Even if I could charge it in 15mins I would still prefer a Volt over a pure electric like a Leaf. Nothing to do with foreign/domestic, I just think the Volt offers the best of both worlds. Electric only, or electric with generator like a Volt is better in my mind that a hybrid like a Prius that still has a standard transmission and driveline in the mix. Being able to charge in 15mins is really going to make a big difference for acceptance.
      The Other Bob
      • 2 Years Ago
      If the range can be reasonable (100+ miles) coupled with fast charging that gets us close to filling it up with gas, then electric vehicles can go mainstream. To me fast charging is more imporatnt than 200 or 300 mile ranges. If it takes a half day to charge it makes no difference if you have a super long range.
        Zoom
        • 2 Years Ago
        @The Other Bob
        Exactly. Very rarely do you need to go 200-300 miles without stopping. I wouldn't mind stopping to charge every third day if it cost me $3 to "fill" up.
        graphikzking
        • 2 Years Ago
        @The Other Bob
        Sounds good.. but I still believe that "volt like" and "plug in prius" cars are a good stepping stone. It gets more companies on board to make batteries helping to bring costs down. If in the next 3-6 years we start to shrink the engines down on these cars to efficient 1.4 / 1,6 liter engines and couple it with electric motors. This could become 25% of our car sales within 7 years. Then we can start to ramp up full electric cars. If batteries drop in price significantly and R&D costs drop because of experience then in 7-13 years 3/4 of the cars we sell could possibly be pure electric The infrastructure would have 10 years to grow, so as gas stations start to replace their tanks would just replace the ones they feel they need to and upgrade to electric pumps on the other side at the same time.
          graphikzking
          • 2 Years Ago
          @graphikzking
          @SloopJohnB - The Tesla was a pretty good 1st try. It will only get better! If they get the battery down to half size with the same "power" and range then I'd say they are very good. BTW - Doesn't Ferrari have KERS systems in many of their race cars? How can you say that there is no electric / hybrid that are competitive to an S8. Also, there is a reason Audi is doing away with that V10 S8. Expensive maintenance, low reliability, low hp for such a large engine - and very fuel thirsty. They are moving to a V8. I do LOVE the sound of the V10. The Fisker Karma isn't too shabby of a 1st start. Notice how all these electric cars have been made by NON automotive experienced companies? Who knows how sweet it could be if Aston Martin, Ferrari, Audi (Etron on the way), BMW get on board and produce a nice electric at like $80-90k. Create a frame made to handle the batteries so that they aren't high up. Put in a range of 300 miles, 0-60 of about 5seconds flat and 2 or 3 speed transmission to get better "mileage".
        graphikzking
        • 2 Years Ago
        @The Other Bob
        Sounds good.. but I still believe that "volt like" and "plug in prius" cars are a good stepping stone. It gets more companies on board to make batteries helping to bring costs down. If in the next 3-6 years we start to shrink the engines down on these cars to efficient 1.4 / 1,6 liter engines and couple it with electric motors. This could become 25% of our car sales within 7 years. Then we can start to ramp up full electric cars. If batteries drop in price significantly and R&D costs drop because of experience then in 7-13 years 3/4 of the cars we sell could possibly be pure electric The infrastructure would have 10 years to grow, so as gas stations start to replace their tanks would just replace the ones they feel they need to and upgrade to electric pumps on the other side at the same time.
        miles
        • 2 Years Ago
        @The Other Bob
        "If it takes a half day to charge it makes no difference if you have a super long range." I don't get your point, Bob. If I have 2-300 mile range, then I don't care if it takes a long time to charge, because I will charge it overnight.
      Making11s
      • 2 Years Ago
      Life with an EV seems to be getting better and better. I think when the charging time hits 10 minutes and range gets up to 300, it's going to be hard to justify an ICE for most drivers.
      nomadsto
      • 2 Years Ago
      Removable battery packs a non starter? Too expensive?
        Making11s
        • 2 Years Ago
        @nomadsto
        Too expensive and already verging on obsolete. The robotics involved are a huge upfront cost for refueling stations. Having people do it is even more expensive over the life of the station. Plus, you have to get manufacturers to agree to standard shapes and sizes. That's much harder than getting them to agree to a connector shape because batteries packs are shaped to fit in specific models. A company called Better Place is working with Holland to set up automated battery swaps. It's an interesting concept, but the idea will be completely obsolete when charge times inevitably get below the time time it takes to swap a battery.
          The Wasp
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Making11s
          I understand that battery tech is rapidly improving and charge times are coming down. In a laptop, though, it can still take a while to charge the battery. The time to charge hasn't changed too much over the last 10 years even though battery life has improved dramatically. I think if a battery swap could be done in 15 minutes, it is unlikely a full battery charge would ever be quicker than that -- certainly not in the near future.
          Krazeecain
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Making11s
          @The Wasp Umm, did you even read the article? Talking about this new *15* to 20 minute fast charging standard? It seems to me that a 15 minute charge IS in the near future...
      Morgan Reale
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hahaha its all a joke - no standard... in the end were just replacing one form of energy for another , what runs your electric power station? coal, oil, gas or even better nuclear - HIGH-LEVEL WASTE - Plutonium-239 has a half-life of 24,000 years. - I'll stick with oil... we are killing this planet
      Ben Wojdyla
      • 2 Years Ago
      Both USArmy TACOM and Nissan displayed dual charge standard plugs at SAE World Congress.
      Ross
      • 2 Years Ago
      However, i read in another article that ultra fast charging reduces the life of the battery significantly.
        Zoom
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ross
        That's a technological issue that can be worked out. Fast charging is the key to getting electric cars to market. These can be added to fuel stations and range will no longer be an issue. Apartment dwellers can charge up as well. It's revolutionary.
          SloopJohnB
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Zoom
          Don't confuse technological issues with physics....I'm not sure there is a technology solution to Li-Ion battery technology.
        Ron
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ross
        At least in regards to the LEAF, quick charging doesn't impact their battery technology. (Never LEAF manuals have deleted the conservative quick charging warning.) It's just as "bad" as charging with L1/L2, as long as you quick charge to the recommended 80% as it's always advertised.
      shang
      • 2 Years Ago
      after watching one recent episode of top gear, i cant help but to notice that kids (or immature adults) going around unplugging these things. there should be some sort of key lock system imo.
        CentralControl
        • 2 Years Ago
        @shang
        the chademo dc fast charge standard does include an electronic interlock so it can not be unplugged while charging. The volt also sets off the car alarm if unplugged from an ac l2 station and the leaf will text message you.
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