AutoWeek reports Bentley is slowly building a team for the brand's return to the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The automaker has hired Graham Humphrys as a consultant. Humphrys penned the BMW V12 LMR that took the win at the 1999 Le Mans, and he's now tasked with heading up a feasibility study for the British luxury manufacturer.

According to Brian Gush, chassis and powertrain director for Bentley, the automaker is currently exploring which class would best suit the company. Humphrys' 30 years of racing experience, including roles on vehicles like the March 82G Group C car, and with companies like Aston Martin and Spice Engineering, should prove instrumental in narrowing down the field.

In the past, Gush has hinted that Bentley would be at home in the GT class, speciffically in the GT3 category. If true, the company will likely campaign a version of the current Continental Supersports, though the automaker could just as easily wait for the next-generation Continental before jumping into the Le Mans fray. AutoWeek says there's no time table for the manufacturer's return at the moment.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      lorenzo
      • 2 Years Ago
      I wonder if the parent company VW - will get their Audi Division to help out the boys from Crewe
        The Doctor
        • 2 Years Ago
        @lorenzo
        VW will definitely be supplying the engine but the rest of the car will mostly likely be done in the UK. It may not have a car industry any more but still has a strong motorsport industry (2/3 of F1 teams are based in the UK)
      Graham
      • 2 Years Ago
      That car is going to look like a school bus next to the other cars.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Banf_1
      • 2 Years Ago
      That would seem to me to be a waste of money from VW's stand point. Why wouldn't they specialize in another form of Motorsport. Why compete against themselves, what are the technological advantages to the whole group that wouldn't stream up from Audi? I think this story is borderline speculation.
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think VW will help one way or another. There's a very good reason Audi worked to enable 45 minute engine/rear end changes IIRC! You hope you don't have to do it, but you design for rapid reparability just in case. It makes the difference between winning and DNF. You generally have to finish to win, even in a race where longest distance in 24 hours determines the winner.
      Rick C.
      • 2 Years Ago
      I hate the posting system here. Poof. My earlier post disappeared.
      Drakkon
      • 2 Years Ago
      Where is the additional 1000 pounds going to go? The idea of the GT classes is you at least start with production parts. What does a body-in-white and a drivetrain weigh on of these monsters? The GT1s of old where silhouette cars on the whole, but the 'lower' classes have usually used some factory parts.
      Mchicha
      • 2 Years Ago
      I would love to see Cadillac at Le mans.. (Peugeot PSA team could help)