Q: What do you call a navigation system designed specifically for the elderly?
A: A map.

In all seriousness, GPS navigation technology designed to help the aged drive more safely could significantly reduce the number of accidents involving geriatric drivers. Old people already attempt to compensate for reduced faculties by changing driving patterns, not driving at night and taking the simplest routes rather than the fastest. It only makes sense to deploy technology to help them determine "easier" ways to a destination.

At least that's the idea behind a $20 million project being developed at Newcastle University in the U.K. According to The Sun, the research is being funded by the British government, with the end result being a system that would give easy-to-understand directions without suggesting turns across traffic or travel on freeways.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 20 Comments
      Polly Prissy Pants
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not sure adding something else that will simply distract and confuse them is going to be the solution.
        SloopJohnB
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Polly Prissy Pants
        Exactly...if you're too old to read a map or use a regular GPS...it's time for GrandDad to give up the keys.
      Acefighter
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hopefully, a "GPS system designed for the elderly" means that it directs them to go home and get off the road.
      andryamom4
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd prefer than anyone who needs a specially designed system to safely navigate, just not drive. If your faculties are reduced to the point that you must alter your driving patterns, you're a danger to others on the road.
      WillieD
      • 2 Years Ago
      I guess they like to waste their taxpayer money just like our government in the U.S. does.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Ian Young
      • 2 Years Ago
      Any GPS that doesn't automatically offer up "The Easiest Route" is a broken GPS, in my estimation. Because usually that route is also the fastest, just by dint of going through fewer in-town intersections. If a trip of ~1hr takes an extra 10 minutes because I didn't have to look for every hidden street sign because the GPS interference makes the map laggy, then the longer trip is the better trip. Distracted driving hurts everyone, not just the geezers.
      Wisdom Seeker
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just make sure they are instructed to pull off the road to upload data.
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      I dunno. IMHO OEM GPS nav systems are an abomination. Toyota, BMW, Mercedes, whatever, the maps become obsolete and it costs as much as a new 5" Garmin to update them....and you can't take the information/addresses you've loaded on them with you to another vehicle (yet...and I doubt you ever will.). Unless the nav is bundled into a package of options you just HAVE to have, I would skip OEM nav. And one more thing...'easiest' way to a destination is like saying shortest or fastest....I've not seen a GPS that was consistently faster; about all they're good for is shortest.
        icerabbit
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SloopJohnB
        I agree with you. This is likely to change with the next generation of connected integrated head units, which will of course come with a monthly or annual subscription fee; to cover free map updates, live location & POI searches, etc MB is going that route next year with MBRACE 2.
      ksrcm
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hmmm ... I regularly, on my own turf where I know every dirt trail, take routes with no left turns, with least amount of traffic lights and with least amount of other "drivers" present even if that means 10 miles travel vs 5-6 miles on "fastest" route. I guess I'm geriatric.
        icerabbit
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ksrcm
        You take routes on the dirt trails where there are no left turns, least amount of traffic lights and least number of other drivers??? I've never seen a traffic light on a trail ... Are you sure those traffic lights are on dirt trails & roads? ;)
          ksrcm
          • 2 Years Ago
          @icerabbit
          No, what I meant to say is that I know all the roads in my area, even dirt trails. Not necessarily I do drive on dirt trails. I use this knowledge to drive without unnecessary stopping or aggravation even if that means way longer route.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Gary Lamphear
      • 2 Years Ago
      A Jitterbug branded GPS is the answer.
      Radwon
      • 2 Years Ago
      It could also warn you when you are driving too slow in the fast lane, asleep in the gutter, when your blinker has been on for more than 10 mins, when you drove over a pedestrian not a speed bump and when you've parked your car in your neighbour's living room. Then there's the alert to tell you that you are still in your driveway. I know I will live to regret this when they take MY license way but one could go on and on.
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