2013 Scion FR-S
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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
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  • 2013 Scion FR-S rear 3/4 view

  • 2013 Scion FR-S
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  • 2013 Scion FR-S driving

  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S driving

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  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S driving

  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S driving

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  • 2013 Scion FR-S driving

  • 2013 Scion FR-S
  • 2013 Scion FR-S driving

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We Finally Sample Scion's Irresistible Lightweight At Home



Five months ago, we flew nearly 11 hours to spend a fleeting afternoon with the highly anticipated Scion FR-S at Japan's Sodegaura Forest Raceway, a track located just outside of Tokyo. Last week, we were in the air for less than an hour en route to Las Vegas to spend a much longer day with the sports coupe on our own turf.

The FR-S impressed us during our first drive in Japan, but the weather turned lousy and we didn't have a chance to drive it on public roads at legal speeds. This time, Scion scheduled plenty of seat time on public roads and on a racing circuit, while Mother Nature provided us with excellent weather.

Driving the coupe again in proper U.S. spec on home roads (and under much more favorable conditions) gave us better insight into the naturally aspirated four-seater. Not only did we learn a lot more about the engine, chassis and its driving dynamics, but we were able to finally interact with the FR-S as a daily driver.

It was, in effect, an interesting and informative second date.
2013 Scion FR-S side view2013 Scion FR-S front view2013 Scion FR-S rear view

Regular readers are unquestionably familiar with the Scion FR-S and its near-twin, the Subaru BRZ. The two sports coupes are the product of a joint program between Toyota Motor Corporation (owner of the Scion brand) and Fuji Heavy Industries (owner of the Subaru brand). The ball started rolling back in 2007 when Toyota was on a quest to pump some excitement into its product line. The automaker wanted to build a car that did not rely on wide sticky tires or all-wheel drive to improve handling. Subaru, a name synonymous with all-wheel drive, wasn't ready to toss its hat into the ring. Toyota pushed ahead anyway, building a lightweight FR (front-engine rear-wheel drive) proof-of-concept prototype that knocked Subaru's socks off. The two soon inked a deal.

Without getting too deeply into specifics, Toyota was tasked with program planning and styling, while Fuji was assigned development and manufacturing in Japan. As far as nomenclature goes, the coupe would be sold as the Toyota GT 86 in Asia and Europe, while the North American marketplace would brand it as the Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ.

2013 Scion FR-S badge2013 Scion FR-S wheel

Nearly identical mechanically, except for some suspension tuning, each automaker tweaked the exterior fascias and configured the cabin for its own clientele. Subaru added automatic climate control and push-button start while Toyota, trying to keep focused on the performance mission, chose manual climate controls and a conventional keyed ignition for its FR-S. From 100 yards, most would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between the two. (We've written thousands of words about the technical aspects of each car. For an in-depth look at the machinery under the sheetmetal, read our man Ramsey's first drive of the Subaru BRZ.)

Its naturally aspirated 2.0-liter flat-four had to lug us up and over Mountain Springs Summit, elevation 5,502 feet.

Red Rock Resort isn't on the famed Las Vegas Strip, it's several miles west at the base of the Spring Mountains. Scion chose to use the casino as our home base and the launching point for our trek to Spring Mountain Motorsports Ranch, located due west on the outskirts of Pahrump. Leaving our gambling money back in the room, we grabbed the keys to an FR-S with a six-speed manual transmission.

As it turns out, crows don't even fly directly to Pahrump, as the Spring Mountains are the home of Charleston Peak. At 11,916 feet, it is a big snow-covered obstacle that forced us south on Nevada State Route 159 through spectacular Red Rock Canyon before we picked up State Route 160 to Pahrump. (What this all meant to the Scion FR-S was that its naturally aspirated 2.0-liter flat-four had to lug us up and over Mountain Springs Summit, elevation 5,502 feet, before dumping us back down at the track on the other side.)

2013 Scion FR-S rear 3/4 view

Subaru's boxer engine, fitted with Toyota's direct-injection fuel system, idled smoothly upon start. Leaving the hotel grounds, we left it in first gear just to hear the engine spin around the tachometer and take in the note coming from the exhaust. A mechanical sound tube, commonplace these days, has been engineered to pipe "good vibrations" into the cabin above 4,000 rpm. It worked alright, but most of the noise still emanated from the injectors and other unpleasant machinery under the hood. We wanted more exhaust note, but it simply wasn't there (Scion has already announced that it will offer an aftermarket TRD silencer shortly after the FR-S is launched).

Shooting in and out of traffic was effortlessly brisk, but we'd never call it particularly quick.

Around town, the FR-S was fun and enjoyable to drive. Its short-shift manual was a delight to row, with three well-placed pedals and nearly perfect clutch operation. Gearing was good at low speeds and the Scion would chirp its way into second gear if driven with aggression. Shooting in and out of traffic was effortlessly brisk, but we'd never call it particularly quick. The suspension was firm, bouncing almost rigidly over tall speed bumps, but still very tolerable and not inappropriate for a sports coupe, after all.

On the highway, we found that the FR-S cruised effortlessly at 75 mph. There was moderate wind noise permeating the cabin at these velocities, yet almost no tire noise. Conversation with our fellow passenger was easy and at normal levels.

2013 Scion FR-S engine

But things soon changed as we climbed slowly towards the mile-high summit through the mountain pass. As slower traffic blocked our way and we pushed harder on the accelerator to move around them, we noted that the Scion was starting to struggle to hold its speed. Passing other vehicles was soon out of the question, as acceleration was just too lethargic to take the risk. With a power rating of 200 horsepower and just 151 pound-feet of torque, what was fun around town had become unresponsive and sluggish when speed and altitude were added to the mix. (A basic rule is that a naturally aspirated engine loses about three percent of its power for every thousand feet of elevation climbed, so the flat-four was down about 30 crucial horsepower at the summit.)

The FR-S took to the challenging racing circuit like a teenage boy to Call of Duty.

About a half-hour later, we arrived at the track to find that Scion had set up three different "stations" for us to test its FR-S. The largest was a 1.5-mile loop on the west end of the main circuit. There was also a wet skidpad for drifting and an autocross-type course market with tightly spaced cones. We would try all three, as each would let us dig a bit further into the dynamics of the new sports coupe.

Recalling our remarkable experience outside Tokyo, when the FR-S effortlessly devoured the asphalt, we headed to the high-speed track first. And, as expected, the Scion FR-S took to the challenging racing circuit like a teenage boy to Call of Duty.

2013 Scion FR-S driving2013 Scion FR-S driving2013 Scion FR-S driving

Our first stint was in an FR-S with the automatic transmission, an impressive six-speed gearbox that shares internals with the eight-speed in the Lexus IS F. With the transmission and VSC set in Sport mode, the powertrain blips the throttle on downshifts and holds the gears through the corners. Forget the hip paddle shifters, as its electronic brain proved better than ours. We tossed the Scion 6AT from corner to corner quite happily and smiled with delight as the intuitive transmission ran through its gears very effectively. Everything was perfectly fine until we tried to follow another talented driver in a 6MT.

The automatic transmission has taller gears than the manual, a trick to deliver better fuel economy.

The automatic transmission has taller gears than the manual, a trick to deliver better fuel economy (the 6AT is rated 25 city/34 highway and 28 combined, while the 6MT is rated 22 city/30 highway and 25 combined). However, the efficient gearing of the 6AT meant it didn't pull as strongly in third or fourth gear – a difference that was very noticeable when trying to follow a 6MT out of a fast corner, or when we jumped behind the wheel of a more spirited 6MT minutes later. In Japan, we theorized that the automatic gearbox may be quicker around a track than a standard gearbox. The new evidence, as observed in Pahrump, proves that we were wrong.

While the manual transmission was slightly quicker around the track, we found both models perfectly balanced and very easy to rotate. The engineers consider the 2,758-pound coupe's 53/47 percent weight distribution as perfect, and we would have to agree. The chassis is fabulously well balanced and very rigid. We lifted off the throttle gently mid-corner and the FR-S predictably rotated (oversteer) around its axis. The movement was stopped almost effortlessly with light throttle and some steering input. Only in the tightest corners, when we dove in far too hot, did understeer surface. As a near-perfect track car, this little coupe would make an excellent trainer at a racing school.


We found Scion's professional drifter Ken Gushi over at the skidpad. While his hot new FR-S (insanely modified to 600 horsepower for Formula Drift competition) wasn't in attendance after his impressive top-eight showing in Long Beach a couple weeks ago, he was there to instruct us on the art of drifting. After painlessly showing us how it is done, we climbed behind the wheel. With a wet skidpad beneath our wheels and the Scion running in first gear, we slowly negotiated a large figure-eight before yanking the parking brake to break the rear wheels loose. The next step, performed nearly instantaneously, involved jumping on the throttle to start the drift. After several failed attempts, each slightly more embarrassing than the one before it, we finally caught on and made a few lame drifting circles around the cones. Yet as pleased as we were with ourselves, our newbie talents pose no threat to Gushi – his job is safe.

Next we ventured over to the faux autocross, a short and very tight path between orange cones that took just over 30 seconds to run in its entirety. Both of the FR-S models were fitted with the automatic transmission, so the exercise was a focus on low to moderate speed handling, not shifting skill. Again, the coupe exhibited excellent balance and poise as long as we were smooth with both throttle and braking inputs. However, if we asked too much of the narrow front tires (e.g., turning the steering wheel while under hard braking) there was severe understeer, tire scrubbing and cones would end up under the front bumper. The solution, of course, was to always remain mindful of the weight transfer and brake in a straight line.

2013 Scion FR-S on track2013 Scion FR-S on track

The trip to Las Vegas was well worth our time, as our lengthier follow-up meeting with the Scion FR-S was very educational. It reinforced many of our earlier good impressions from Japan, while flushing out some new (formerly unnoticed) minor weaknesses.

We remained stupefied by the coupe's excellent handling, perfect balance and tossable driving dynamics. Despite its rather narrow tires (215/45-17 on all four corners), lateral grip is strong and the stock brakes never exhibited fade. The driving position and bucket seats were comfortable for our six-foot, two-inch frame during our day-long journey and its sleek styling continued to turn heads.


2013 Scion FR-S rear 3/4 view

As far as relationships go, the 2013 Scion FR-S is very worthy of a long-term commitment.

Of course, there were a few nagging annoyances. First of all, the standard Pioneer audio system with a three-line OLED display is frustrating to use and the sound quality is only average (step up to the optional BeSpoke Premium Audio with a 5.8-inch TFT touchscreen display and save some headaches). Second, there are no grab handles anywhere above the beltline within the cabin, so your passengers will be clawing at the headliner while your dry cleaning sits on the floor. Third, the back seats are only fit for children – not only is legroom cramped, footroom under the seat is nearly nonexistent. Lastly, there is the power deficit at higher speeds. Proper gearing masks the issue up to about 65 mph, but then the naturally aspirated four-cylinder simply runs out of breath (a much-rumored upcoming turbocharger would make the FR-S just about perfect).

But overall, this was a very promising second date. While there are plenty of options out there, lightweight, well-balanced sports coupes priced at just $24,930 are the rare exception, not the rule in today's automotive environment. Add in excellent manners, physical attractiveness and a playful personality and we become more enamored with the new coupe each time we meet. There is no shame in saying that as far as relationships go, the 2013 Scion FR-S is very worthy of a long-term commitment.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 282 Comments
      kuntknife
      • 3 Years Ago
      Paraphrasing the Subaru videos release a day or two ago, they said that any owner can add power to a car, but only *the manufacturer* can truly set the center of gravity. If you really want to compare apples and oranges by comparing this car to a Mustang, I bought a used '07 GSX-R 600 last year for $5K. It seems like you'd have to be a babbling moron to buy a Mustang for 5 times the amount and get far worse numbers, no? If you can argue that your car has a roof for rainy days, has 4 seats, is safer and so on, I really don't see why your brain can't fire similar synapses and see the worth of the FR-S or BRZ compared to a Mustang.
        PatrickH
        • 3 Years Ago
        @kuntknife
        Sounds good to me. Hey Subaru don't void my factory warranty when I bump up horsepower to 300 with a turbo. kkthx
      David S Lombana
      • 3 Years Ago
      Problems overtaking in mountains with a lightweight RWD sports car? hmm...car or driver? When in a place like Colombia you're limited to driving a Nissan Tiida with an AT when going on family trips (5 adults in the car). These trips are through narrow and sometimes steep 3rd world mountain roads and we can overtake cars and semis just fine (pushing the obviously inadequate car to its limit), so I have to doubt your complaints about lack of power for this car.
      brgtlm
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am glad to see the US car reviews trickling out. Would like to see the tests in the big four car magazines soon to see the cars test stats. I think Autoblog's review supports the general consensus of the FR-S/BR-Z twins - great handling/vehicle dynamics with adequate power (0-60 in 6-7 seconds). Other cars I put in this category would be MX-5 Miata, RX-8, GTI, Civic Si and Cooper S. If all you're after is the fastest 0-60 time for your buck, the twins and the other cars are not going to fit. What these cars have in common is that you can push them really hard, have a great time doing it and not be afraid that the cars are going to bite you back. I think Toyota and Subaru did a great disservice to the twins by saddling them with "Grand Touring summer tires." Even if you stuck with stock sized tires and put on Michelin Pilot Super Sport or similar tires, the car would be an even better handler. The stock tire choice is mystifying.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @brgtlm
        [blocked]
      viperbono
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ok this common platform stuff is getting to common, so common the almost look the same, BORING~! Not a bad looking car if there weren't three of the same that almost look identical!~Lame
      Aaron Linkous
      • 3 Years Ago
      HA! I saw you guys out at Red Rock and wondered.... wish I had come over for a closer look
      Vaelseth
      • 3 Years Ago
      Though I was disappointing when the initial specs where released. The more I hear about this car the more impressed I am. The styling is simple but attractive, and should age well. I would still prefer about 240hp. But if I was shopping for an affordable sports car, I would test drive this first.
      Justin Campanale
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love Autobloggers. They whine and bitch that America never gets fun cars. And when the fun cars do come here, they whine and bitch endlessly "oh my god it's so overpriced" "no torque""my parent's malibu will eat this in a straight line". Seriously, guys, if going fast in a straight line is all you're interested in, go ahead and buy a WRX or Mustang and be happy with your larger, heavier car. This car is supposesd to be a reincarnation of the E30 BMW M3. The E30, in its day, proved that a simple formula- low weight, low ride height, master engineering, manual transmission,high revving engine, can turn out to be a shitload of fun. The E30 isn't amazingly fast compared to modern cars, but it is more fun than just about any modern car short of a Porsche. This FRS takes all of that, and brings it in a good looking package, into an era where true driver's cars are becoming more and more of a raarity.. and that too, from a company which is known for making reliable, but bland and sterile cars.Not to mention that it has one advantage that the BMW didn't have-price. You get all the fun from the BMW, but under $30k. My brother got his BRZ yesterday, and he could not be happier with his car. And he is a person who currently owns a dualclutch equipped Evo, and the car he is replacing with the BRZ is a Challenger SRT8, both of which are straight line machines. I am currently saving up for an RS5, so this car is not going to find a spot in my garage anytime soon, but if my budget was more limited, I'd buy this in an instant. This has got to be the best driver's machine nowadays this side of $50k.
        ChrisH
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        I was not aware any BRZ's were in the states yet. Considering we know which ship is currently bringing the first batch here. http://www.ft86club.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5285
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @ChrisH
          My brother told me that he bought a BRZ over the phone yesterday. I called him again just now, turns out that this is just another one of his jokes. :( But he said he's ordering one right after they arrive at his dealer.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        [blocked]
          NightFlight
          • 3 Years Ago
          Your 323 is as slow as piss, and since it is older, is more than likely a POS.
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          Read my comment again. I said E30 M3. The current gen, E92 M3 does a 4 second 0-60.
          Synthono
          • 3 Years Ago
          He did say E30, which is from the '80s, and significantly lighter and less powerful than a current model M3.
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
        AcidTonic
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Lolz at calling an Evo a straight line machine.
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @AcidTonic
          Compared to the BRZ, the Evo is a straight line machine. Compared to a Mustang....maybe not.
          antacid
          • 3 Years Ago
          @AcidTonic
          The Evo would still destroy a BRZ on a track with not a single straight edge to it. Maybe people want both speed and handling? Why do you think everything has to be so black and white? I dont want a muscle car because they have no handling, and I dont want a BRZ because it has no speed, I want a car with balance.
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @AcidTonic
          Except that the BRZ doesn't compete with the Evo. It competes with the GTI, Veloster Turbo, Cooper S, 500 Abarth, Miata, and Civic Si. It does well against those cars.
          kcroc10077
          • 3 Years Ago
          @AcidTonic
          @Justin--Don't go overboard to make a point. I'm sure you know the EVO is a monster on the straights and the twisties. As for the Mustang, you do realize it was on the heels of the M3 around VIR and Laguna Seca. Does that mean the M3 is also a straight line machine?
        The Wasp
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Best driver's machine under $50k? That's hard to believe, especially after reading this article. Mustang Boss 302 has gotten rave reviews. Also, I'm surprised you wouldn't consider the BMW 1M to be the modern incarnation of an old BMW 3 (fyi the E## stuff just sounds pretentious for non-BMWophiles).
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @The Wasp
          Mustang Boss- good car, but cheap interior, 1M-it has a turbo and it's not high revving, plus, it's a bito f a porker.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @The Wasp
          [blocked]
        Basil Exposition
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        "the car he is replacing with the BRZ is a Challenger SRT8," Awww, downgrade!
          kcroc10077
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          @Feurig Hopefully someone at Chrysler/Dodge/SRT reads this and decides to make a proper Mustang fighter. The Barracuda should weigh 3200 lbs, manual transmission ( DCT option), V6 and V8 engines. The Challenger is good looking but kinda heavy.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          [blocked]
          404 not found
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          Sorry, the Challenger is a land barge.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
        Nzo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Just curious, do you live in Canada?
      ngiotta
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm not sure what the hype about this car or the subie is about. I can buy a brand new Mustang for $2,000 and have over 100hp more than this (and better highway mileage too). Granted, it's an attractive car that is probably fun to drive due to the great handling. But it's way down on power for the amount of money that it costs. Why you would buy this over a Mustang or even a Camaro is beyond me.
        jcar302
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ngiotta
        I said the same thing last week about the subaru version, by the time the day was done i had like -25 in ratings. Fanboys come out of the woodwork for this car, i have no clue why. It's no track star the mustang easily owns it on the road course and drag strip, gas mileage isn't great for what it is, 0-60 and quarter mile is a joke, i can't come up with one good thing to say about it. 150ft lbs of torque lol. I guess on a positive note, the car isn't powerful enough to wear out rear tires. I know, hate me all you want guys, but this car is an overpriced POS. When you guys buy one, do not make the mistake of looking at any mustang or camaro owners, stick to racing minivans and full size suv's. At least this way you have a chance at winning. BTW, by claiming this car is tossable or trackable, that's just another way of saying, it really sucks. It's not how you play the game, it's whether you win or lose. Your parents have been lying to you guys all these years.
          Lastchance
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jcar302
          You don't get it do you?
          Lazgun
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jcar302
          Sorry, but they cant beat full size suv,s with that zero to sixty
          NightFlight
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jcar302
          "BTW, by claiming this car is tossable or trackable, that's just another way of saying, it really sucks." That's just another way of saying it sucks? Ummm, no. All it says it that you are an idiot.
          David Donovan
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jcar302
          I remember back when I had my 2002 Nissan Sentra SE-R Spec V and it having 170 tq was considered lacking back then but 10 years later it's more then acceptable now. But yeah I've noticed on here if you say anything negative about this car you will have a billion thumbs down but I've seen some of the most retarded posting ever about this car yet they have a billion up votes. For whatever reason people are buying into the hype of this car because it handles good, which even then is a lie since Motortrend tested both and the V6 Mustang out performed it in braking, acceleration, figure 8, etc. But hey have fun over paying for a smaller, worse performing car because you like the kool aide you're drinking.
        bobmarley
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ngiotta
        yes...its beyond your narrow little mind
        bazinga
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ngiotta
        Good thing you don't have to buy it, right?
        torqued
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ngiotta
        You answered your own question: "it's an attractive car that is probably fun to drive due to the great handling" To many people, more fun to drive=better. To others, more HP=better. The latter camp will buy mustangs, WRX's, and Genesises. This is one of few cars catering to the "more fun" crowd.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @torqued
          [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
          @torqued
          [blocked]
          David Donovan
          • 3 Years Ago
          @torqued
          God you are such an idiot SVX. Gee I can't imagine why a fleet vehicle (Suburban and Tahoe) out sell a niche market vehicle!?
          • 3 Years Ago
          @torqued
          [blocked]
          David Donovan
          • 3 Years Ago
          @torqued
          Oh I guess when I went to Enterprise rent a car for my road trip down to South Carolina I didn't pick up a Suburban from them. :rolleyes: Fleet sales are rental car places as well "functional retard"
        superchan7
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ngiotta
        It needs about 50 hp and some nice summer tires to become a bottle of awesome. It's OK to inflate the price to cover the cost of super or turbocharging...sports cars aren't volume sellers anyway.
        Emilio Ferrer
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ngiotta
        Brand new Mustang for 2K o.O where?
      Kambui Brown
      • 3 Years Ago
      Mustang starts of at $22k w/ 305hp and 31mpg why would anyone want this piece...
        Deslock
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Kambui Brown
        Cool, can you enlighten me as to why bench racers choose which car to buy based only on MSRP, power, and AT highway MPG?
        jtav2002
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Kambui Brown
        The Mustang also weighs 1000lbs more. As mentioned, if you have to ask, you've missed the point of the car. If you care about bragging rights on a window sticker, sure the Mustang wins. Some people enjoy the act of driving more than they enjoy the act of pointing numbers on a sheet that don't mean much to anyone but you.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Kambui Brown
        [blocked]
      Starkeesha
      • 3 Years Ago
      Another pile of ass from Toyota and Subaru. Damn thing is UGLLLLYYYY!
      alexkoolur
      • 3 Years Ago
      150ft of torque is a joke. 200hp about a joke. The descriptions of this car AT SPEED in normal driving conditions sums it up...it is VASTLY UNDERPOWERED. Unless you consider acceleration and passing important....duhhh Sure, this thing might feel appealing on a controlled-environment track (hence this is how they got most journalist to review it) - but in the real world, under real conditions, it can't hold it's own. For slightly more, you can pick up a slightly used WRX STI that would smoke this thing, in all conditions.
        jase.s
        • 3 Years Ago
        @alexkoolur
        You do realize that the vast majority of cars on the road have less than 200hp, right? Take a look out the window and tell me how many Corollas, Civics, Sentras, tC's, Mazda3s', 4 cylinder Camry, Accords, Sonatas, Kias, and so on you see...
        Josh
        • 3 Years Ago
        @alexkoolur
        You mean, your gussied up, econo-class car w. wider tires and AWD? Hmm, I wonder how something like that can 'smoke' a car with a completely different philosophy. Sometimes it's not all about numbers and sometimes its not even about stoplight to stoplight supremacy. The FR-S is for someone who enjoys driving. Read: typically not BMW owners. You don't own a BMW do you?
          Deslock
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Josh
          alexkoolur, I owned a WRX. Boost rush was fun every time, but the throttle response, turbo lag, steering, shifter, and brakes were horrendous and understeer was significant. Mods can overcome only so much. The STI I drove addressed some of that, but it still wasn't as fun as my RX8, which wasn't as fun as my MX5. Sometimes less is more.
          WindsWilling
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Josh
          BS marketing at it's best. Listen mr know-it-all, you can have just as much, or more fun in a wider-tired, AWD, proper power output car on a track or back road as this. In fact, the WRX and Evo are the best everyday, every weather, every road, Point-A to Point-B cars out there. And they are respected by far more people for obvious reason. They will destroy this car on a closed track. Even the understeering pig that is a stock WRX will destroy this quick hype cash in car. You'd be one of those people in your beat up 240sx in primer since you just blew every last cent on that knock off front bumper telling a GT-R driver "yeah, i mean numbers are cool, but i want a fun to drive car". LOL. Go home and be a fangirl.
      protovici
      • 3 Years Ago
      Appears a Nissan Altama and a Nissan 370Z made love, 9-moths later had a Scion FR-S.
        Justin Campanale
        • 3 Years Ago
        @protovici
        You really need to get your eyes checked.
        mitytitywhitey
        • 3 Years Ago
        @protovici
        Actually the gestation period of a sporty Toyota is at least 5 years, and Scion kept getting false negative pregnancy tests with the on-again, off-again FR-S. 2007 "it's a Scion! Wait, false alarm. " 2009 "we're having a Scion! Oops, wrong again" 2011 "no really, we're actually giving birth to a Scion! hello?"
        bazinga
        • 3 Years Ago
        @protovici
        A blind person made love to a can of lead paint, 9 months later a protovici was born.
        4 String
        • 3 Years Ago
        @protovici
        Noooo, not even.
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