General Motors' vision for the all-electric EN-V pod cars has always been to deploy them in the heavily crowded mega cities of the future, so it makes perfect sense that a rendering for the next-generation model was revealed today at the Beijing Motor Show. Ladies and gentlemen, meet the most futuristic Chevrolet ever.

With room for two, the EN-V 2.0 gets what looks like a longer wheelbase compared to the first edition (see it here) thanks to rear wheels that now extend outwards, as well as things people expect from a "car" (no matter what it looks like), like climate control and storage space. Oh, and GM says that, "In addition, it would be capable of driving in all weather and city road conditions." That's key. The new EN-V could potentially be available in 2020, but pilot studies will take place in China before then. The 25-mile range from the first EN-V, which was unveiled at the World Expo 2010 in Shanghai, remains.

EN-V stands for Electric Networked-Vehicle, so it's no surprise that the EN-V 2.0 concept includes mobile Internet access and telematics along with an EV powertrain. Kevin Wale, president and managing director of the GM China Group, said in a statement that the EN-V 2.0's "combination of sensing technology, wireless communication and GPS-based navigation establishes a technology foundation, pieces of which could potentially lead the way to the creation of future advanced vehicle systems." More work needs to be done, as the vehicle has shown somewhat flawed autonomous driving capabilities thus far.
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General Motors Shows Glimpse of the Chevrolet EN-V 2.0 Mobility Concept Vehicle in Beijing

2012-04-23

Beijing – General Motors today at Auto China 2012 showed the company's vision of the Chevrolet EN-V 2.0 concept, the next version of the company's revolutionary mobility concept from World Expo 2010 Shanghai.

"Our designers and engineers are exploring a range of options for turning the EN-V concept into a reality. The EN-V 2.0 concept would use technologies such as the mobility Internet, electrification and telematics to help change the automotive landscape and ensure a sustainable future for our industry," said Kevin Wale, President and Managing Director of the GM China Group. "The EN-V 2.0 design rendering we are showing today is our vision for the next step."

The original EN-V (Electric Networked-Vehicle) concept was a centerpiece of the SAIC-GM Pavilion at World Expo 2010 Shanghai and one of GM's most talked-about concepts ever. The two-seat electric vehicle pioneered a new automobile DNA based on the convergence of electrification and connectivity. It was developed to show the possibilities for alleviating concerns surrounding traffic congestion, parking availability, air quality and affordability for tomorrow's cities.

"We're very excited about EN-V 2.0 concept, which embodies the essence of its predecessor but was evolved into a more practical design for real-life use," said Wale. "The combination of sensing technology, wireless communication and GPS-based navigation establishes a technology foundation, pieces of which could potentially lead the way to the creation of future advanced vehicle systems."

EN-V 2.0 concept adds features that consumers demand such as in-vehicle climate control and personal storage space. In addition, it would be capable of driving in all weather and city road conditions.

"We are designing the Chevrolet EN-V 2.0 to have a modular architecture so our engineers would have the flexibility to create a simple vehicle with manual operation or a more complex, fully autonomous and networked vehicle," said Wale.

The concept's wireless communication enables a "social network" that can be used by drivers and occupants to communicate with friends or business associates while on the go. GM expects to employ EN-V 2.0 prototype models in pilot studies throughout China.

General Motors has 11 joint ventures, two wholly owned foreign enterprises and more than 35,000 employees in China. GM and its joint ventures offer the broadest lineup of vehicles and brands among automakers in China. Passenger cars and commercial vehicles are sold under the Baojun, Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Jiefang, Opel and Wuling brands. In 2011, GM sold more than 2.5 million vehicles in China. It has been the sales leader among global automakers in the market for seven consecutive years. More information on General Motors in China can be found at GM Media Online.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      Perfect for city driving, except I'd be afraid of damaging those wheel covers when parking / bumping into curbs.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        Curb rash is just a fact of life in the city. If you're particularly worried, take the covers off.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        I've discovered a neat trick. i don't drive into them! ;-)
      EZEE
      • 3 Years Ago
      Two things.... 1) think back to the article that I TIPPED on how popular those 3 wheel electric vehicles are in china. If these things are cheap enough, they might be onto somethnng, 2). Scientific American has a larger article on IBM's lithium air battery: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=lithium-air-oxygen-battery Some good stuff. For the Libertairians/Objectivists, the concept of drawing energy out of the air is similar to JohnGalts motor (although that concept was on static electricity. For the liberals, ignore that reference as it is from a satanic book from hell.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.” ― Paul Krugman
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          You mean to add, 'Former Advisor to Enron, Paul Krugman'
          sirvixisvexed
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Way to hawk vague quotes and not think for yourself, spec! Last I checked, THAT was a strategy of 14 year olds. You must have never read it, or it flew over your head. Paul Krugman? NY Times op-ed columnist? That's like quoting Fox news, guy! Do you pretend you have no bias? Write me a coherent explanation explaining your leftist BS quote
          throwback
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Krugman's entitled to his opinion, makes it no more valid than anyone elses in regards to reviewing books.
        sirvixisvexed
        • 3 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        Just finally finished Atlas about a month or two ago, LOL. Best book ever. Then I watched the movie and wept at its awfulness, because it completely misses the part about how the important characters are disciplined exceptionalists whose CHOSEN habits and characteristics and personal dedication to their trade FOR personal gain (which when honest people do honest things for honest gain, it is *gasp* not evil and terrible when they profit! or *gasp* are not evil and terrible and oppressive for being "rich"!) and are the reason anything is ever accomplished in the world. Instead it makes them look like rather-friendly paper-pushing executives who live at meetings and behind desks and whose reasons for being great are not really defined, or shown. Almost as if a leftist who hated the cliff's notes made the movie! Maybe part 2 or 3, if made, will be better?
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sirvixisvexed
          They have tossed the director and much of the cast for part 2 (although I liked the guy that played Hank Rearden - he made the character more likable than in the book).
          sirvixisvexed
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sirvixisvexed
          Ah nice! Hopefully part two is good. Hank wasn't bad. Francisco had a good moment or two. I liked all of the book characters better. We'll see how it turns out!
        brotherkenny4
        • 3 Years Ago
        @EZEE
        The lithium-air battery researchers never address actual energy density. They always just compare cathode materials and don't really objectively define what that means. So they mislead people (more specifically, they lie). They say that the lithium air cathode has much higher energy density, but they don't tell you that besides replacing the cathode material they have to add, a support structure, porous void, an air plenum, a a solid state electrolyte/separator, an air pump etc. and they don't tell you what the actual volume difference is. It is the new hydrogen scam. People are catching on to the difficulties of hydrogen, so this is the new waste project for the republicans to tout. Always with the promise of great things but never to be actually viable. It takes money and effort away from those things that might actually work and continues the world as it is for the sake of the current wealth makers. Now, that said, it may make it as a stationary battery, where cost is more the issue than volume or energy density, but not likely to work for vehicles. The people in the upper levels of DOE need to grow a brain.
      Ziv
      • 3 Years Ago
      If you can fit two normal sized people into this concept, why can't a Twizzy have a real second seat? Of course, early production vs. concept, but still. The twizzy would be kind of interesting if there was room for a second adult in it. And no the grocery seat in the back doesn't count.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ziv
        You can't fit a second person into the Twizzy? It is pretty pointless then. I assumed you could.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @Ziv, I like the Opel 1+1-seater Rake concept. Very cool.
          Ziv
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Spec, I kind of liked the idea of a cheap two person vehicle with really high efficiency, and the Twizzy is kind of goofy cool, but the seat in the back is kind of stark. DaveMart is right that some people could make it work, but I tend to look at the world through my own eyes, and since I am 6'4" that back seat is pretty much useless. And I have never seen a photo of it being used. I have a feeling it would be pretty crowded if the driver is just 6' tall since that would only move the seat forward around 2" from where it would have been for me. Flip side of the coin, it doesn't look like the legroom is that great in the EN-V, either. But at least the EN-V has your friend riding beside you, not in back like an unwanted guest. But I think that the more concepts that go into production the better. I have even looked at GEM's, which are actually kind of cool in a basic sort of way.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          It's scooter like accommodation. If you are 6'4" then someone won't be able to sit behind you, but that does not mean that no-one can use it as a two seater.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      make an aerodynamic low cost enclosed twizy and you might have something.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      so the geniuses at GM figured 4 wheels might be better than balancing on 2... that's why they pay them the big bucks... sigh what a world. jam packed with idiots. I could wiggle my little finger in comatosed sleep and it would be more intelligent than their efforts for a thousand years.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Yep. But don't call it an NEV or you'll get voted down.
        mycommentemail
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Awesome. Looking forward to a link to something intelligent you have done. Anything useful or original would be accepted.
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      That make me sick. Another vehicule for the rich only like the tesla and fisker kaput. This car can only serve inside a big house to travel from the room to the living room, especially for the ederly and it can serve outside around the house to move in silence. That toy cannot go on the road. The richs will buy that to entertain their parties and impress their friends. This is irrelevent to green sustainable non-polluting transportation except if maybe this weird looking cabin is a teleportation machine .
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      In North America, this would never qualify as anything above a NEV. If a 50 mile range at 50mph or below works for your commuting needs, building your own from a older economy car with a blown engine is really cost effective. Not as nice looking... but if nothing is available on the market, make do.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        There really needs to be a middle ground between NEV and highway capable. Until then, the middle ground i present is a cheap and easy way to convert a car to electric. It opens the doors for electric driving to a lot more people. The majority of America doesn't have >$30k to plop down for a car.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          @ 2WM "The majority of America doesn't have >$30k to plop down for a car." Yes, they do ! The average car new car price in the US is $33,000, with monthly repayments of $400, or 10% of income.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Marco, you have a skewed idea of what kind of money we're making here. We're not doing so well. The middle class has shrunk pretty bad in the past few decades. The economic recession is technically over, but it doesn't feel like it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_income_in_the_United_States#Income_distribution Here are some 2010 numbers.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Averages are tricky, since there are several different ones to choose from. 2WMs statement is true if if you ask will most people ever be able to buy a new car. The answer is no, it is a minority sport. Those from lower incomes who do manage to get a new car, often after the kids have left home, tend to buy the cheapest cars available. And in the US there are increasing numbers of people who are on part time or minimum income job, so a rise in the income of plastic surgeons or whatever may raise the average income but does nothing to enable the masses to fund such a large purchase. We should all rejoice though that CEO's pay has now risen to something like 400 times average income, up hugely from the 1980's without any obvious increase in performance.
          mycommentemail
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Agreed on the price... but if it is truly an autonomous car I would think of it more like a local taxi service for in-town use. You wouldn't buy the car, you would belong to the car service (like zip car) and be ferried to and from your destination.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        When was the last time you got out of your car and disassembled it for a horse? Laws change.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        The ENV is supposed to be 40 miles AER, which is probably plenty for a NEV. In China, urban speeds tend to be quite a bit lower than the US, due to a lot of mixed traffic (i.e. bikes, scooters, trucks) and new drivers. And presumably, the GM concept is ubiquitous charging, not just charge-at-home.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        That nice... NEVs suck though, they don't work here. the speed limit for them in most states is so low that it intentionally makes the vehicle useless. when you have 30, 35, 40, 45, 50mph roads, a vehicle designed with a maximum speed of 25mph is dangerous and inconvenient to operate on them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neighborhood_Electric_Vehicle#U.S._regulations Due to the legality issues, it is much better to take a car that was previously highway certified, and put a powertrain in it that can do 40-50mph. Older cars ( 1990's and older ) are perfect due to their low weight and small size. They're pretty safe in a slower speed collision, but lacking at higher speeds.. so being a a city-speed EV is really a perfect job for them.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      So the EN-V morphed into an NEV. Just give it up GM.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        How is it bad that GM is taking the urban Smart ForTwo to it's logical conclusion? - 2-seats, - minimum-footprint, - short-range electric drivetrain City distances are short, and if used a la Zipcar or point-to-point charging, it can always be charging. Most rides are 1 or 2 people. Doesn't need to carry lots of stuff, so pod factor is fine and easier to park. If mass-transit isn't ubiquitious, and people need to cover distances incovenient to walk, then some kind of urban pod makes good sense.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          It seems perfectly reasonable for GM to consider the mega-urban market, especially as they expand into China and other nations where people want something more than a scooter, but where a full-size auto isn't really justified. I could use one where I live quite easily. Granted this is still in the concept stage, I'm glad to see GM pursuing this type of transportation alternative.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          It doesn't compete with the Smart ForTwo . . . that is a full highway speed crash-tested car. I have no problems with NEVs, they are great. But I don't think they fit in GM's business model well.
          mycommentemail
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          @Marco Polo If it is autonomous, why would anyone own it? It would merely be another type of taxi. But cheaper and more prevalent.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          @mycommentemail A nation of people just emerging from a much hated 'collectivised' state, are hardly likely to find much appeal in anything with common ownership.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          I'm not sure why you'd think they would consider an enclosed personal conveyance undesirable...
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          @LTW, "China and other nations where people want something more than a scooter, but where a full-size auto isn't really justified." Just one problem, in a nation where 'status' is very important, the average PRC consumer would rather ride a bike that own such a vehicle.
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