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  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

  • Pierre Arpin's automotive art

We've all heard the argument that cars can't be art. As a commodity, vehicles are slaves to parameters of functionality, manufacturing and economics that simply have no bearing on traditional works, but Canadian sculptor Pierre Arpin believes that shouldn't stop car parts from ascending beyond their usual lot in life. While waiting in a repair shop, Arpin spotted a trashed hood and asked to take it home. The shop obliged, starting the artist down a lengthy path of creation. While he typically favors hoods, doors and radiators have also received his unique touch.

Arpin uses heat to remove the orignial paint before taking a grinder to the metal to create his unique designs. Depending on the work, paint may be reapplied afterward. The artist calls the process a type of "alchemy," and says that the technique gives the pieces a certain level of "immortality." We don't know about that, but as people with various car body parts strewn about our offices, we can see the appeal.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      anonymous guy
      • 3 Years Ago
      What's the ONE thing I hate most on my car? Scratches. Those might be car parts, but still ... scratches! UGH!
      Devin Christiansen
      • 3 Years Ago
      Poor Audi. That thing was clean.
      hp
      • 3 Years Ago
      "The artist calls the process a type of "alchemy," and says that the technique gives the pieces a certain level of "immortality"" I can see the designs as art, I suppose. But to think you're doing all that... you have to be pretty full of yourself.
        Titanium Welders
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hp
        agreed.... never knew that painted sheet metal attacked with a 90 degree die grinder with a sanding wheel would grant immortality. Wonder if I were to hit that bald spot on my head with that spray on hair then hit it with a Norelco I could live to be 150.
      AnalogJesse
      • 3 Years Ago
      I was going to come in here to defend this guy, but most of those are actually really bad.
      Scr
      • 3 Years Ago
      So 90's.
      AldenBiesen
      • 3 Years Ago
      Step away from the vehicle, sir.
      Antonio K. Piech
      • 3 Years Ago
      Art? Owned the same car a 1990 Audi 90 that was a trade and the hood was like that anyway,to get the pain match was a nightmare but love the car and the pearl white paint....I do feel sorry for this one though!!!
      Vien Huynh
      • 3 Years Ago
      vandalism typically look better than those "art".
      hevace
      • 3 Years Ago
      I liked the Camaros with the 32's better.
      Ducman69
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is what happens when you use those drive-through automatic washers in third world countries.
      Pitt05
      • 3 Years Ago
      Very cool. I bet some of the Mercedes hoods would look great, like the last generation E or S class, they have really nice lines and curves, like the Jaguar hoods.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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