• Apr 19, 2012
Honda and Acura have had their fair share of issues over the last few years – from earthquakes, tsunamis and floods to important new models not being all that well received – but that hasn't stopped them from claiming top honors in Edmunds' 2012 Best Retained Value Awards.

According to Edmunds, on average, Honda vehicles are expected to retain 47.9 percent of their value after five years; Acura is just behind with 44.6 percent, taking the win in the luxury segment. In the mainstream category, Toyota and Mazda each got honorable mentions while Lexus and Cadillac to secondary honors in the luxury stakes.

Interestingly, despite not scoring the win in the mainstream class or even managing an honorable mention, Ford had the most individual wins in Edmunds' categories with five, beating Honda's four class victories. The vehicle expected to retain the most value after five years out of all classes is the Toyota Tacoma.

Want more? Click here for the full rundown from Edmunds.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 71 Comments
      Coach
      • 2 Years Ago
      Honda is simply in a class by itself. I agree the cars are getting a little boring but they are so reliable. I have a Ridgeline that just rolled to 300,000. Looks and runs great. Not sure whats next but i've been loyal to them since 1984.
      MJC
      • 2 Years Ago
      Yet another reason why I cannot understand how anyone can buy a Toyota. Honda makes better performing, better looking, more reliable cars that also retain more value.
        SCOTTM
        • 2 Years Ago
        @MJC
        I'm not so sure about that. My family has owned both Honda and Toyota vehicles. We've had less problems with Toyota. In fact, I haven't had any problems with mine and I've had it for five years now. My brother-in-law's transmission in his Passport just went out last weekend at 198,000 miles. Yeah, that sounds impressive, but our Toyota's have never had transmission problems with higher miles. It's going to cost him $3,000 to replace it with a used one. That's better than my mother who had to replace her transmissions in both her 3.8L Buick Century and 4.3L Chevy S-10 at less than 150,000.
          Smooth
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SCOTTM
          The Passport, honestly, wasn't one of Honda's best efforts and it was made in conjunction with Isuzu and the Rodeo. Not a "real" Honda so to speak.....
          John Montgomery
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SCOTTM
          I agree. My Honda was awesome but it was not nearly as reliable as my Toyota.
          Mondrell
          • 2 Years Ago
          @SCOTTM
          Scott nonetheless makes a valid point; anyone who knows anything about Hondas knows that their track record for automatic transmissions is a bit checkered, especially for a slew of "real" Honda/Acura cars produced during the millenial years thanks to bad parts and engineering oversights.
      BillS
      • 2 Years Ago
      but Acuras are so ugly......at least to me they are.
      BFE
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hyundai nowhere to be seen. Leave it to their marketing to claim they've got best resale value.
      Basil Exposition
      • 2 Years Ago
      This makes sense. Honda still has some die-hard fans, yet with each refresh their cars get less and less attractive. So what do you do if you really want a Honda, but don't want one of the lame new models? Buy used, therby helping raise residuals.
        789dm
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Basil Exposition
        You right about that! Long time ago I bought a used 1994 Acura Legend for $5500 and after 3 years driving it I decided to sell it again and the most amazing thing is that I sold it again for same amount of money I bought $5500.
      Dvanos
      • 2 Years Ago
      I never get these so called resale value ratings, I mean no one buys these cars as investments and you always get raped on a trade in. I mean really how many of us get money back on a trade in???? NEVER happens unless you put like 40% down or something.
        MJC
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dvanos
        As someone who doesn't like to borrow money to buy a car, I can tell you that resale value is very important. If you can sell a Civic with $100K miles privately for $6K (totally realistic), you've got a third of the money you need for a new one.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      jaynyc27
      • 2 Years Ago
      The new Hondas and Acuras make the old ones all the more attractive. (I say that as a Honda owner.)
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      I know what that is - Honda doesn't do new designs. The current civic looks almost like the 10 year old civic; uses same engine, transmission, radio.
        angryinch_1
        • 2 Years Ago
        @desinerd1
        The engines in the Civic are not the same as 10 years ago. First, I realize I'm replying to a known Honda troll, but I'm going to anyway. The R18 in the Civic is came out in the past Civic. How many car companies totally redesign an engine every 5 years. NONE. Speaking of engines, you get a woody over the Elantra. The Elantra has ONE engine. The Civic has a 1.8 The Civic has a 2.5 The Civic has a hybrid The Civic has a natural gas. Poor Hyundai has to guarantee the buy back value on their products because nobody will buy a used Hyundai.
          desinerd1
          • 2 Years Ago
          @angryinch_1
          Except that nobody buys Civic Hybrid or Natural gas. I rarely see Hybird Civic on road and I have NEVER seen Natural Gas on road. Toyota sells more Prius than all Honda Hybrid models combined. Poor Honda had such bad reception of the Civic that they had to go back to design boards and reintroduce new model in just one year.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @angryinch_1
          [blocked]
      Sean Conrad
      • 2 Years Ago
      Kinda surprised given the relative nose-dive of Civic sales, though then again I imagine that'd take some time to have a real impact on surveys like this.
        MJC
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sean Conrad
        Based on February data, Civic sales are up 36% over last year.
          Sean Conrad
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MJC
          Well clearly I was mis-informed. I've only ever seen the overall brand sales, not individual vehicle sales. My mistake.
        Lou
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sean Conrad
        Yeah, despite the comments on Autoblog, the current Civic is still selling really well.
          789dm
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Lou
          Yeah I can never understand why many people bought the current "new" civic I saw many of them on the road.
        untitledfolder
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sean Conrad
        When your CEO comes out and publicly apologizes for making a boring car designed for the recession, then you know the new Civic sucks wholesale balls. Honda died sometime in the late 90's/early 00's.
      Rob J
      • 2 Years Ago
      Very surprised to see Cadillac up there. Not so surprised by anything else.
        CJ_313
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rob J
        I agree, I'm very surprised to Cadillac listed as taking a secondary honor, right beside Lexus! Seems strange... You can pick up a 3+ year old STS, SRX, or DTS for way less than half of their original MSRP's. The only models that seem to command a higher resale value is the CTS and, to a degree, the Escalade.
      desinerd1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Acura TL U.S. Sales 2005 78,218 2006 71,348 2007 58,545 2008 46,766 2009 33,620 2010 34,049 2011 31,237 Acura TSX U.S. Sales 2005 34,856 2006 38,035 2007 33,037 2008 31,998 2009 28,650 2010 32,076 2011 30,935 Acura RL U.S. Sales 2005 17,572 2006 11,501 2007 6262 2008 4517 2009 2043 2010 2037 2011 1,096 Acura ZDX U.S. Sales 2009 79 2010 3259 2011 1564 Does anyone see the declining sales trend here?
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