As we've reported in the past, one major issue confronting the U.S. auto industry is its ability to recruit talent to live in Detroit, home of General Motors and spiritual birthplace of Chrysler and Ford. According to the Detroit Free Press, advertising cooperative Commonwealth, a joint venture between San Francisco-based Goodby, Silverstein & Partners and New York-based McCann Erickson Worldwide, isn't having the same problem.

Commonwealth plans to embed itself in the middle of Detroit with 280 workers mostly imported from such marketing powerhouse cities as New York and San Francisco. The firm has already begun moving into the Palms Building which also houses the popular Fillmore Detroit performance venue. Says Todd Grantham, associate partner and Goodby's managing director for Detroit:

"You just have to be the type that comes in here and knows, I can build something here. That's how we attract people. What we want is the people who come in here and go, 'Wow, this is a blank canvas. It's all around me and now I can do something.'"

Whether or not the advertising firm will be successful in its ploy to bring more young professionals to Detroit remains to be seen, but Quicken Loans' Dan Gilbert seems to be making a pretty good go of it with his various operations. So far, there are at least three such willing transplants interviewed in the video down below. It'll surely take a lot more than three enterprising transplants to succeed, but at least it's a start. If nothing else, we're certain that there are already a good deal of talented individuals already in Detroit waiting for a chance to prove their worth.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      chickenflauta
      • 2 Years Ago
      For those dying to work in advertising for auto brands, Detroit seems like the place to be. Team Detroit, a joint venture between several WPP companies, is also there serving Ford's marketing and advertising needs. But I'm willing to bet no major creative agencies in SF or NYC ever felt the need to make a video asking employees why they moved there.... Just sayin'...
        Chris
        • 2 Years Ago
        @chickenflauta
        Ah yes, but NYC and SF never had quite the image problem Detroit has. Even at their worst, NYC and SF were far more attractive to people. Those cities never experienced crime and economic decline to the same extent that Detroit has. So, can you really blame them for trying to right the ship and attract new residents to the city? What would you expect the city to do? Throw in the towel?
      Chris
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is encouraging news to hear for me, but I still have a hard time believing that the US auto industry was having difficulty recruiting talent to live in Detroit. Unless there is some clause stating that they must live in the inner city, what is to stop them from living in any of the surrounding suburbs, and commuting into the city to work? It's the city where most of the problems have always been. The metro area is one home to some of the most prosperous areas in the country.
      TBQ
      • 2 Years Ago
      Only reason they're moving there is because they desperately want a [bigger] piece of the Big 3 ad dollars. I grew up there, Detroit is still a corrupt cesspool full of ugly people.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TBQ
        [blocked]
        Dwight Bynum Jr.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TBQ
        @ TBQ, I went to college there and I agree with everything in your post. Definitely not much in the way of female talent in that burned out city! But then again, most women I met in Michigan were a bit... sub-par, haha!
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dwight Bynum Jr.
          [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @TBQ
        [blocked]
          Dwight Bynum Jr.
          • 2 Years Ago
          Ha! I love how everyone uses the "four seasons" comeback. I'll be sure to ask the next snow bird I see down here in Florida with a Michigan "mitten" on their license plate why they left their four amazing seasons...
      bobulated
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good luck getting young creative talent to move from NYC or SF to Detroit. I'm not putting Detroit down, but creatives move to SF and NYC for a reason; there is much more competition for their services and they are paid accordingly not to mention the cultural advantages of living in those places as opposed to Detroit.
      Thipps
      • 2 Years Ago
      Very happy to hear this. as a past resident of Detroit for 5 years i cant wait to move back. I cant describe how or why but i really do love that city.
        darkness
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Thipps
        No place like the D, just as bad any other big city.
          jhott997
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          First of all, Detroit is no longer a "big city". Secondly, if you travel to other areas of the country you will quickly realize that Detroit is a cesspool of rottenness.
      Rumblestrip
      • 2 Years Ago
      Well anyone from Detroit would tell you that is not "The Filmore", it is "The State Theatre" just like it's Pine Knob, not "The DTE Energy Music Theatre"
      mikekilmar
      • 2 Years Ago
      There was a great little web documentary on Detroit by no other than Johnny Knoxville of Jackass fame that was actually pretty good. He traveled around and explored a lot of bad areas but it was then contrasted with what they wanted to call a revival of sorts. Made it look like there is some potential for the big D maybe somewhere down the line... Also, apparently in the 50s and 60s, Detroit was a mid west metropolis on the rise.. who knew!
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