The Associated Press reports General Motors has pulled all 11 Chevrolet IndyCar engines from testing after racer James Hinchcliffe blew one during testing at Sonoma. GM evidently was concerned enough about the 10 other engines having similar problems that it decided to swap them all and face the resulting sanctions.

Under IndyCar's current rules, Hinchcliffe, driver of the GoDaddy.com will be penalized for the failure despite the fact that it had nothing to do with the driver. IndyCar prohibits engine changes until the units have reached a minimum of 1,200 miles, a figure that is set to jump to 1,850 miles after this weekend. IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard, meanwhile, maintains that the rule is meant to reduce costs for teams. He also pointed out that both Honda and Lotus have received similar penalties this season. But that hasn't stopped some from grumbling about the rules.

Until this point, Chevrolet has done exceedingly well this season, nabbing the first two poles and taking a victory at the season-opening race. The company currently holds the lead in the manufacturer's title with 18 points – six points ahead of Honda.

Hinchcliffe, meanwhile, says he's excited about the challenge that the engine swap presents. He, along with a smattering of other racers, will now start at the back of the pack, and Indycar's rulemakers have themselves a new controversy to contend with.


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  • 23 Comments
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      spdracerut
      • 2 Years Ago
      There's always that balance between performance and reliabiilty... It appears they were a little too biased towards performance. They did get a win and two poles though in the first two races, so the performance is there.
      abba
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just to be clear, the "Chevy" engines are made by Ilmor - the same company that contracted the "Honda" vV8 Indy engines in the past few years. And the same company that makes the "Mercedes-Benz" F1 engines. This year Honda Racing is actually making their first engine over here since the CART V8 days. "Lotus" engines are designed by John Judd's company in England. Judd, just like the two (now one), Ilmor founders, he started at Cosworth - who's engines were branded as "Ford."
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @abba
        And Ilmor also made the previous CART "Chevy" engines (just after the M-B ones).
          abba
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Yup. There was a spat a few years back when Cos did a Chevy branded IRL engine before Honda took the whole field.
      dave and mary
      • 2 Years Ago
      GM took big help from the Government. Government told GM who to fire. GM can't do anything right. Imagine that.
        otay90
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dave and mary
        Most illogical post ever.
        Mchicha
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dave and mary
        That is why they have won pretty much all races since coming back.
        Xedicon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dave and mary
        Why does EVERY post involving GM have to have at least one person like you? Seriously move on already.
        Jerry
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dave and mary
        C6-R? That's something they did right!
        Dark Gnat
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dave and mary
        So...are you Dave or Mary?
        dave and mary
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dave and mary
        I see there are many Cavalier owners here - who are pained by truth. Trade up to a Cobalt - better car. By inches.
          Dark Gnat
          • 2 Years Ago
          @dave and mary
          Sounds like you know all about inches.
      zzz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hah!! Chevy fails so hard.
        Justin Wilkinson
        • 2 Years Ago
        @zzz
        Riiiight... Two poles and a win to start the season is totally failing... Get outta here... There weren't problems with the other 10 engines, they just wanted to check in on them to make sure since one failed... I'd say that's pretty smart on their end in developing a more reliable powerhouse. It after all was a "test session."
      Xedicon
      • 2 Years Ago
      I for one commend Chevy for taking this step. While engine failure is not always catastrophic in terms of safety, taking a known risk of failure at 190mph is not responsible and it's nice to see priorities in the proper order.
      mikelee
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hey Chevy . . . call CompCams (in Memphis). They have years of experience with and a crap-load of Chevy-engineed NASCAR racers, and a lot of experience with dynamic problems(!)
      zanarditypes
      • 2 Years Ago
      How is this a "rules controversy"? An engine replaced before meeting a set mileage results in a grid penalty, just like in F1. So?
      Andyz
      • 2 Years Ago
      My concern is a bunch of fast guys with new engines starting from the back of the grid....sound familiar, and we know how that ended.
      hotsauce
      • 2 Years Ago
      How many of you are eating crow after Chevy absolutely dominated that race today??
      SloopJohnB
      • 2 Years Ago
      Back to a cam sprocket bolt failure again, GM?
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