Fisker Automotive
may drop plans to use a Delaware factory to build its upcoming Atlantic sedan and is looking at "other options," Automotive News reports, citing an interview with company CEO Tom LaSorda. The company, in an online meeting with owners of the Fisker Karma extended-range plug-in sedan, spelled out some of the issues that have been plaguing the car.

Fisker will hold off on deciding on the Atlantic's production site until the end of summer, which will delay the model's debut. LaSorda maintains that Fisker will be able to produce the Atlantic with or without Department of Energy funding, according to Automotive News. Fisker's director of corporate communications, Russell Datz, tells AutoblogGreen that the company remains "committed to Delaware" but admits that if the rest of the company's DOE loan money does not come through, the plan to build the Atlantic in Delaware could change.

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Fisker has taken about 2,500 orders for the Karma, though most of the $529 million it was set to receive in U.S. Department of Energy loans has been held off because of production delays. Thus far, Datz said, Fisker has received $193 million – about $169 million was for Karma development, $24 million earmarked for the Atlantic.

Fisker, in an online meeting with Karma owners, has also addressed a number of issues related to battery replacement, software upgrades and other components, according to Consumer Reports, which owns one of the vehicles. Specifically, Fisker says that the battery problems stemming from supplier A123 Systems impact cars with batteries made at A123's Michigan plant. While only about one percent of the 2012 Karmas have had problems caused by these batteries, all batteries made at that facility will be replaced by year end, the publication says.

Additionally, Fisker says an upgrade to the Karma's 6.15 software system will fix issues related to the car's fuel gauge, back-up camera and tire-pressure warning lights, and will improve navigation, temperature controls and radio-preset restoration.

On Wednesday, Fisker unveiled a prototype of the Fisker Atlantic, previously known as Project Nina, and provided more details before the New York Auto Show. Specifically, the car will be priced similarly to an Audi A5 (somewhere in the $45,000 range) and officials say its on-board gas-powered range extender will be a BMW four-cylinder engine. No details have been revealed about driving range or when first deliveries might take place.

Additional reporting by Sebastian Blanco in New York.


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  • 29 Comments
      mustsvt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Fisker will be joining Tucker on history's scrapbook as another underfunded ambitious, technological start up that took its product out of the oven before it was done baking. The only difference is that taxpayers didn't blow millions of dollars on the Tucker...
        johnbravo6
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mustsvt
        Tucker was railroaded by the big automakers in bed with the government. This company crawled under the sheets right from the get-go to avoid that scenario.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      sloanm101
      • 2 Years Ago
      Need to move to a "Right to work" state
        • 2 Years Ago
        @sloanm101
        [blocked]
          otiswild
          • 2 Years Ago
          You are wrong! http://www.nrtw.org/rtws.htm http://bluehenconservative.blogspot.com/2011/05/why-delaware-should-become-right-to.html
          alexlivefree
          • 2 Years Ago
          otiswild is using a blogspot blog as a source. Seriously, people have stopped looking at facts and just read any BS that suits their bias views.
      Scr
      • 2 Years Ago
      And how much did Delaware kick in for Fisker t buy the GM plant at liquidation to build this thing? And with BMW engines? And those engines will be made where? So, half a billion dollars allocated so rich people can roll around in fancy cars that get worse mileage than a pickup truck, brick and then cannot be restarted without getting a whole new battery pack. And what of the 5000 jobs promised? The entire upper level staff of the DOE should be in jail for violating the public's trust in collossal finacial mismangement. And "Secretary" Chu should have to give his Nobel Prize back, 'cause he clearly ain't that smart,.
      FreeThinker
      • 2 Years Ago
      Most people have no idea that billions ($XXX,XXX,XXX,XXX.XX) of tax dollars have been handed over to the oil industry in the form of subsidies, grants, and some loans. Over the past 100 years. There's no use arguing with the ignorant bumpkins.
      Bobby Robinson
      • 2 Years Ago
      The only thing that is needed for EVs to make a huge splash is better energy storage. With the research being done by IBM and PolyPlus on lithium-air batteries, who knows how sophisticated and FAST electric cars might become. If lithium-air batteries or other technologies still in the lab make it to market, who needs a gas powered car anymore? I know I wont.
        otiswild
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Bobby Robinson
        Nope, pure EVs also need faster _charging_ to go with those higher capacity batteries. Charging needs to get to about 4000KW to equalize with the charging "rate" from a gas or diesel nozzle. Gas is about 33KWh of energy per gallon, how many gallons per minute is your average pump going to put out? Perhaps with capacitors and superconducting charge wires you'll see that sort of charging capacity. Me, I'd rather see batteries as buffers and warmup energy sources for hydrocarbon SOFCs, which use synthetic fuels from atmospheric (recycled) CO2 + H2O + thorium fission waste heat..
          alexlivefree
          • 2 Years Ago
          @otiswild
          Battery capacity is improving. Charging stations are starting to appear in many locations. Heck, heard of EVGO? They are opening 200 charging stations in CA. The future are cars like the Volt, no question about it. It's just a matter of the price dropping, and they will as more consumers buy them.
          Bobby Robinson
          • 2 Years Ago
          @otiswild
          Not really. You can charge your car over night at home when you sleep. IBM has what is called the Battery 500 Project this is on par with the best internal combustion engine cars. Unless you plan on making cross country trips every day of the week, charging should not be a problem for daily use.
      SoreCylinder
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ill say they have problems. I was driving behind a Fisker sedan last night and the back right tail light didn't work. That's like a common 1970s era problem. It was a beautiful design, however.
        FreeThinker
        • 2 Years Ago
        @SoreCylinder
        Funny. I was driving behind a brand new Audi A7 this weekend and the center brake light and part of the left tail light LED's did not light up at stops. It still had the dealer ad plates where the license plates go. You have no idea what you are talking about.
      Bobby Robinson
      • 2 Years Ago
      The only thing that is needed for EVs to make a huge splash is better energy storage. With the research being done by IBM and PolyPlus on lithium-air batteries, who knows how sophisticated and FAST electric cars might become. If lithium-air batteries or other technologies still in the lab make it to market, who needs a gas powered car anymore? I know I wont.
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