Fisker Atlantic
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Fisker Automotive
may drop plans to use a Delaware factory to build its upcoming Atlantic sedan and is looking at "other options," Automotive News is reporting, citing an interview with company CEO Tom LaSorda. The company, in an online meeting with owners of the Fisker Karma extended-range plug-in sedan, spelled out some of the issues that have been plaguing the car.

Fisker will hold off on deciding on the Atlantic's production site until the end of summer, which will delay the debut of the model. LaSorda maintains that Fisker will be able to produce the Atlantic with or without Department of Energy funding, Automotive News reports. Fisker's director of corporate communications, Russell Datz, tells AutoblogGreen that the company remains "committed to Delaware" but admits that if the rest of the company's DOE loan money does not come through, the plan to build the Atlantic in Delaware could change.

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Fisker has taken about 2,500 orders for the Karma, though most of the $529 million it was set to receive in U.S. Department of Energy loans has been held off because of production delays. Thus far, Datz said, Fisker has received $193 million – about $169 million was for Karma development, $24 million earmarked for the Atlantic.

Fisker, in an online meeting with Karma owners, has also addressed a number of issues related to battery replacement, software upgrades and other components, according to Consumer Reports, which owns one of the vehicles. Specifically, Fisker says that the battery problems stemming from supplier A123 Systems impact cars with batteries made at A123's Michigan plant. While only about one percent of the 2012 Karmas have had problems caused by these batteries, all batteries made at that facility will be replaced by year end, the publication says.

Additionally, Fisker says an upgrade to the Karma's 6.15 software system will fix issues related to the car's fuel gauge, back-up camera and tire-pressure warning lights, and will improve navigation, temperature controls and radio-preset restoration.

Two days ago, Fisker unveiled a prototype of the Fisker Atlantic – previously known as Project Nina – and gave more details before the New York Auto Show. Specifically, the car will be priced similarly to an Audi A5 – somewhere in the $45,000 range – and officials say its on-board gas-powered range extender will be a BMW four-cylinder engine. No details have been revealed about driving range or when first deliveries might take place.

Additional reporting by Sebastian Blanco in New York.


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  • 41 Comments
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      how many fisker karma owners are there? how many attended the meeting. why are there not more if they have 2500 orders
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Many orders are undoubtedly from Dealers, who order multiple cars to have on hand, ready for walk-up customers. Many current Karma owners simply walked into a dealer and bought the car they saw sitting there, while some Karma deposit holders (who put down their money months or years earlier) are still waiting for their specific car to be built.
      Grendal
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well, $392 million will hopefully bring the Atlantic to fruition. That's actually more than the remainder of the DOE loan that Fisker hadn't yet received. That brings the total of private financing over $800 million? Fisker can certainly convince investors to invest in his products...
      Nick From Montreal
      • 3 Years Ago
      To the Fisker hater: investors value execution over anything else. Delivering cars to paying customers is an incredible achievement. Most of the bugs are being ironed out and were caused by so many parts being developed from scratch (yeah, crazy...). I'm not sure if Fisker will be independent for long (would make a great sub-brand for BMW, Audi or Daimler) but it's definitely not a scam. It's only a scam if your money disappears and no cars are being delivered. Now Coda, there's a head scratcher...
        throwback
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick From Montreal
        I agree about Fisker being bought out eventually. I doubt BMW, Audi or Daimler will be buyers. BMW is committed to their I sub brand, Audi has their E-tron sub brand, and MB seems to be going with their own E-cell technology. I think Ford is a strong possibility. Fisker has connections there and Ford does not have an international presence in the luxury space. Although Ford seems committed to Lincoln, I think Fisker would be a better play internationally. If the Atlantic gets built and it's priced where they say it will be (A5/BMW 3 range) I will seriously consider one. It has to drive well though.
          paulwesterberg
          • 3 Years Ago
          @throwback
          Chrysler/Fiat would make a better fit for the technology and they could use a new upscale brand, but I doubt they have as much extra capitol to fund such an acquisition.
      Steven
      • 3 Years Ago
      At $100K-a-pop, it's a rich boy's toy. No government has the right to force working class taxpayers to subsidize rich people's playthings.
        Grendal
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Steven
        Steven - you didn't even read the article, did you? Because everything you said has nothing to do with this car.
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Steven
        The Atlantic is supposed to cost roughly $45k
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. I wish, however, that you would join me.
          EVnerdGene
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          ur dreamin' they're dreamin' or ?
      drivein62
      • 3 Years Ago
      A rich man's toy the Federal government had no business spending our money on.
      diffrunt
      • 3 Years Ago
      Shut it down, go w/2nd gen.
      Rotation
      • 3 Years Ago
      You don't say. A shocker. Their only hope of staying afloat is to find another country to hand them a new pile of cash. It's just not a terribly salable car, and their dev costs for such a complex vehicle are quite high.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        I know. I can't believe Fisker is having difficulty moving from concept to production after how smoothly the Karma went.
      mustsvt
      • 3 Years Ago
      Fisker is headed for the scrap heap. Time to write off those loans. I'm shocked that Tom LaSorda signed on to this sinking ship.
        EVnerdGene
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mustsvt
        we reap what we sow
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mustsvt
        "Time to write off those loans." Why would you write off a loan that won't even come due for several years still? Fisker has 3 years from the closing date of the loan to *start* repaying principal - sometime late this year - and doesn't have to make the final quarterly payment until 2017-ish.
      PR
      • 3 Years Ago
      It looks like LaSorda is pulling a Crazy-Ivan in order to re-negotiate the best tax credits and terms of agreement to continue construction at the Delaware plant. Pretty good CEO move, to be honest. The whole idea is to pretend to turn away from the Delaware plant, and then send everyone else into a panic. This forces them to re-negotiate stuff like state tax credits, federal loan programs, infrastructure support (like local road or port upgrades), etc. In the end, the goal is to do a complete 360 degree turn, and return on course to manufacturing at the Delaware plant. But with a whole boat-load of added incentives in tow. This happens all the time in the corporate world. This is actually a very good sign that Fisker is getting extremely serious about production. If they had any intention to fold up or sell out, they wouldn't be bothering with a Crazy-Ivan that is obviously targeting production in the Delaware plant.
      emailrobertcena
      • 3 Years Ago
      it is good to hear that Fisker may change plans on Delaware production, details Karma troubles. I think this will surely bring success for them. http://www.equipmentsjunction.com
      The Libertarian
      • 3 Years Ago
      Who in their right mind would build anything in *Delaware*? They hate industry. They hate rich people. They hate the free market. The only other place it could be more expensive to build a car would be California, where in addition to all of the above, they hate cars.
        marcopolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @The Libertarian
        The Libertarian, Um,...this is the state famous for it's very low corporate taxes, right.?
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @marcopolo
          there was a joke on the old 'Get Smart' show. The evil group, Chaos, would have a threat, and at the end, would say, 'a Delaware corporation.'. Maxwell Smart would then say to 99, 'they do that for tax purposes.'
      Scambuster
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Frisker scam on the government and naive investors is coming to an end. Having milked all these sucker's worth, Frisker founders will retire in paradise. America may not produce quality cars, but it sure produces too many suckers.
        PR
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Scambuster
        Yes, you hate Obama. We know already. Taking it out on Fisker or any other car company every single time there is a story about them, just because they took funds from a George Bush loan program, is booooooorrrrriiiiinnngg!!!!
          EVnerdGene
          • 3 Years Ago
          @PR
          this'un was approved by the current administration
          EVnerdGene
          • 3 Years Ago
          @PR
          the current administration arranged this loan Gore connection, Biden arm twisting, Delaware union jobs follow the smell of money and graft, it goes ripe to the top
        marcopolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Scambuster
        @ Scambuster You are a curious sort of guy! You take a perverse delight in posting absurd drivel in a desperate attempt to become top troll. As I said last time, ABG already has a very established Troll, and several contenders. You chances of success are small, now I'm sure there are several small town's in need of an apprentice village idiot, or even a slack-jawed yokel.... try there and leave us alone!
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @marcopolo
          What had me I tears was that everyone knows what you are talking about, without you saying it! :D
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