When the 2013 Ford Fusion goes on sale this fall, it will be the first mid-size family sedan in North America to be offered with start-stop technology. But since not all buyers are open to the idea of having their engines turn off at stop lights to save fuel, Ford will be offering it as optional equipment, and the automaker has now announced that the stand-alone feature will cost $295.

The 2013 Fusion will launch with three powertrains (not including Hybrid and Energi variants), but only the 1.6-liter EcoBoost inline-four is available with start-stop. This engine produces 172 horsepower and 179 pound-feet of torque, and can be had with either a six-speed manual or automatic transmission. As of this writing, it's unclear whether or not start-stop will be available with both transmissions. The Fusion's other powertrains – a 2.5-liter naturally aspirated inline-four and 2.0-liter EcoBoost four – will not be available with the technology.

According to Ford, the 1.6-liter Fusion should be good for up to 37 miles per gallon on the highway, putting it at the top of its class in terms of fuel economy. Based on its calculations, Ford estimates that drivers who opt for the start-stop-equipped Fusion will save "about $1,100 more than other midsize sedan owners during five years of driving."

We'll be interested to see what the take rate is on start-stop once the Fusion goes on sale later this year. For the full details, scroll down to read Ford's press release.
Show full PR text
Ford Fusion Auto Start-Stop System Priced at Only $295; Technology Delivers Thousands of Dollars in Fuel Savings

- New Ford Fusion is the first non-hybrid midsize sedan available with Auto Start-Stop; this fuel-saving technology offered in the U.S. for only $295

- With Fusion's 1.6-liter EcoBoost engine, Ford Auto Start-Stop will help drivers save as much as $1,100 over five years at today's fuel prices versus midsize competitors

- Auto Start-Stop improves fuel efficiency by about 3.5 percent overall; predominantly city drivers can save up to 10 percent

- On sale this fall, Fusion offers customers the Power of Choice with the broadest selection of fuel-efficient powertrains in the midsize car segment – two EcoBoost-powered gasoline engines, a normally aspirated four-cylinder engine, a hybrid and a plug-in hybrid

DEARBORN, Mich., April 2, 2012 – With the national average price of gasoline nearing $4 a gallon, the new Ford Fusion offers yet another way for consumers to save money at the pump as the first non-hybrid midsize sedan available with Auto Start-Stop.

The fuel-saving technology will be offered for only $295, allowing more buyers to opt for the new technology and underscoring Ford's commitment to make fuel economy affordable for millions. Similar systems in other competitive cars can cost several thousand dollars.

"We expect the average Fusion driver with the 1.6-liter EcoBoost engine and Auto Start-Stop will save about $1,100 more than other midsize sedan owners during five years of driving," said Samantha Hoyt, Fusion marketing manager. "That's cash in their pocket and time saved with fewer trips to the pump."

Auto Start-Stop saves fuel use when the car is standing and running at idle. Savings vary depending on driving patterns, but owners who spend most time in heavy urban areas and city traffic will benefit the most – up to 10 percent. On average, Auto Start-Stop improves fuel efficiency by about 3.5 percent.

Wasting gas while we wait

A study by the United States Department of the Treasury estimates that congestion consumed an extra 1.9 billion gallons of fuel in 2011, approximately 5 percent of all the gasoline used.

Communities across America – including Denver and Ann Arbor, Mich., – are considering ordinances banning excessive engine idling.

"Idling vehicles are consuming energy without doing any work," said Birgit Sorgenfrei, Ford's Auto Start-Stop program manager. "They're also producing exhaust gases in a concentrated space that can contribute to air quality problems like smog."

Studies show drivers encounter an average of 10 to 15 red lights and stop signs on a typical 20 mile commute, which can add 5 to 15 minutes of idle time and wasted gas.

Fast, seamless, no added maintenance

Ford is making Auto Start-Stop – one of the most popular features of hybrid vehicles – available with the new 1.6-liter EcoBoost-powered Fusion. When the Fusion comes to a stop, the engine can automatically switch off, consuming no gasoline and emitting no exhaust gases. As soon as the driver releases brake pedal, the engine seamlessly re-starts itself and is ready to go by the time the driver presses the accelerator pedal.

"Our team has put a lot of effort into calibrating the Auto Start-Stop on the Fusion to make it as transparent as possible to the driver and passengers," says Sorgenfrei.

Auto Start-Stop is the latest addition to the new Ford Fusion's industry leading suite of affordable, fuel saving technologies, including:

EcoBoost engines, which combine turbocharging, direct injection and twin independent variable camshaft timing or Ti-VCT, with downsizing to deliver outstanding fuel economy without sacrificing performance.

Electric power steering eliminating the engine-driven hydraulic pump, lines and fluid.
Six-speed transmissions, which enable engines to run more efficiently by always selecting the best gear for top fuel economy.

On sale this fall, Fusion offers customers the Power of Choice with the broadest selection of fuel-efficient powertrains in the midsize car segment – two EcoBoost-powered gasoline engines, a normally aspirated four-cylinder engine, a hybrid and a plug-in hybrid. Fuel-economy includes:

- 2013 Fusion 1.6-liter EcoBoost: Delivering a projected 37 mpg highway
- 2013 Fusion Hybrid: Delivering at least a projected 47 mpg – 4 mpg better than the Toyota Camry Hybrid
- 2013 Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid: Delivering at least a projected 100 MPGe-plus rating – making it the world's most fuel-efficient midsize sedan

The story behind the new Fusion

For more on the new Ford Fusion, check out http://FordFusionStory.com, a special mobile site featuring articles, videos and graphics that are easily shareable directly from a smartphone, tablet or computer browser to Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and blogs.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 39 Comments
      Letstakeawalk
      • 13 Hours Ago
      Designers often work simultaneously on different projects for different customers. No conflict of interest at all. In my own business, I often do contract work for competitors. They hire me because they know I'm good at what I do, and they know that my reputation will enhance their project. Tesla stated they had planned to use "Designed by Fisker Coachbuild" as a promotional tool. Tesla even knew that Fisker was working with Quantum, and didn't complain. Fisker's product, a PHEV, wasn't even supposed to compete with their product, a BEV, so there was no conflict of interest. Tesla even joked about selling Fisker some of their technology to get his project running. Daryl Siry personally informed Tesla's executive staff that the Fisker/Quantum project wouldn't amount to anything and that Fisker's service should be retained for the Whitestar. The Arbitration Ruling was that Henrik Fisker never hid his intention to develop a PHEV with Quantum, and that Tesla was aware that Henrik had multiple contracts working with different companies on automotive projects (very commonplace for a designer). Tesla even asked Henrik about his plans for his PHEV, and then ultimately decided it was not competitive with their plans, and they re-entered into a new second contract fully aware of Fisker's PHEV plans. The Judge stated, "Tesla's assertions of violations... were baseless and neither brought nor pursued in good faith." Fisker was the prevailing party, and awarded approximately $1 million for the work he had done for Tesla. So, yes, IMHO, and in the opinion of the court - Tesla's lawsuit against Fisker was baseless (frivolous) and simply an attempt to avoid paying him for satisfactory work he had completed for the Whitestar Project.
      EVnerdGene
      • 13 Hours Ago
      oh yeah, so let's keep driving our 4X4s to the liquor store and to get our lotto tickets
      DaveMart
      • 13 Hours Ago
      That's a good price from Ford. Some of the 'Bluemotion' VW models from VW for instance cost much, much more than the less fuel efficient models. Here is one article on it - you need heavier duty starter motors and batteries: http://carbuzzard.com/2012/04/auto-start-stop-system-for-295-in-a-ford-fusion-is-the-better-deal/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=auto-start-stop-system-for-295-in-a-ford-fusion-is-the-better-deal And here are some user comments on stop/start: http://backfires.caranddriver.com/forums/53/posts/279647-ford-prices-2013-fusion%25e2%2580%2599s-stop-start-system-at-295-keeps-rest-of-the-car%25e2%2580%2599s-price-a-secret?page=1 There are a couple of things to bear in mind about this Ford system: It does not provide for regenerative braking, as more sophisticated systems do. It uses AGM batteries not lithium batteries or capacitors as the Peugeot system does. The batteries will not last forever doing stop/ start, unlike capacitors. I'm not really sure I would bother with this. I definitely would for a capacitor driven system with regen.
      • 13 Hours Ago
      My S-Max with 1.6 litre Ecoboost engine has it as standard feature because the EU fuel consumption test cycle includes engine idling. It works very well: it only kicks in when the engine has warmed up, when the battery is full enough, when it is not freezing outside. Ventilation and engine seem to continue to run, albeit at a lower level. As soon as extra electricity is needed for AC/ Heat or accessories the engine comes back on. It's very responsive, as soon as I touch the clutch pedal the engine comes back on. Don't know how it works with an automatic transmission.
      JP
      • 13 Hours Ago
      Using AGM batteries this feature will likely kill them quickly, disabling the stop start feature after a short time. Mostly marketing gimmick without a more advanced battery.
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 13 Hours Ago
      As long as the implementation isn't annoying this becomes a no brainer option. Nice job Ford for offering it. These direct injection engines are just amazing compared to what automakers could do 5 years ago. Ford is getting 172 HP out of a 1.6liter and I'm sure its on 87 octane at that. I remember being impressed when the Civic Si got 200hp from a 2.0 liter 6 years ago, but that was with premium and a tweaked up engine - not the small engine on a family hauler. Direct Injection rocks.
      Lou Grinzo
      • 13 Hours Ago
      For people who read sites like this one (or mine, frankly), this option is indeed a no brainer. One-year payback on a greener alternative? Instant sale. For the vast majority of American drivers, I'm not so sure it will be popular. They will see an additional $300 for something they perceive as new, different, and weird. (And anyone want to bet on how few Ford salespeople point out that VW sold cars with this feature in the US during the second oil shock, roughly 1980?) And they will definitely be highly skeptical of the quick payback period, if for no other reason than they're hearing about it for the first time from a car salesperson or one of Ford's insipid ads.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @Lou Grinzo
        Sadly, i believe you are correct. Cue extreme right wing finding something wrong with it and saying that the hummer is cleaner than it, or that it's an Obama mobile etc.
        DaveMart
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @Lou Grinzo
        '(And anyone want to bet on how few Ford salespeople point out that VW sold cars with this feature in the US during the second oil shock, roughly 1980?) ' I doubt those who remember this have pleasant recollections. The batteries in those days would not have liked constant stop/starts at all.
      Doug
      • 13 Hours Ago
      Start stop should just be standard on all cars.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @Doug
        Eventually it will be, just as radios and airbags were once options.
          EVnerdGene
          • 13 Hours Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          I hope by choice instead of fascist mandate. I have chosen stop/start; love it. I often sit next to a monster FUV or sportPU at a traffic light - ruhmp-ruhmp-buruburah-ruhmp - and think; "he's using more energy just sitting there, than my car at 50 MPH"
      • 2 Years Ago
      my q is how does battery recharge it self with out depend on engine to feed charging it ? As the ads says the eletrica motor will run up to 62 mph without engine and how long will battery last with out charging it? Does eletrica motor have its own charging auto when low ? steve
      Letstakeawalk
      • 13 Hours Ago
      Even though Henrik Fisker was originally contracted to do the original design for the Whitestar (now Model S), after Tesla's failed frivolous lawsuit the car was completely redesigned. Franz von Holzhausen should be given credit for the Model S - Fisker had nothing to do with it.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 13 Hours Ago
      It's amazing how much it looks like the Tesla Model S. http://uncrate.com/p/2009/03/tesla-model-s.jpg
        Spiffster
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        Its somewhat Aston Martin-ish too, but both the Model S and the Aston Martin are Fisker designs. Ford owns part of Aston Martin still (I think). It makes sense, and its certainly not a bad thing.
      EVnerdGene
      • 13 Hours Ago
      for the price, this is a fantastic looking car ! Rented a last years model recently. Kick-butt, and great ride. Imagine green weinies; if everyone in the US drove something like this (on average), we would not need to import any foreign oil - at all.
        EZEE
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @EVnerdGene
        I actually rented the current Camry. The interior was very nice, but I was shocked at the ride and handling compared to the fusion. I was expecting a butt kicking by Toyota, but I was surprised. It was like a Buick thank handled bumps in the road like a Volkswagen (loud THUNK).
        carney373
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @EVnerdGene
        Wrong. It's fist-in-face ugly. They just had to ruin the beautiful 2010-2012 generation with this. Sigh. And you're also wrong about not needing to import foreign oil. We have 25% of world oil demand and only 2% of commercially recoverable oil reserves, INCLUDING Arctic and offshore. The only way out of the trap is to use something OTHER than oil to move.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @EVnerdGene
        Over 90% of our oil comes from other countries. So a 5%-10% reduction of our oil usage would be a tiny drop in the bucket.
        EZEE
        • 13 Hours Ago
        @EVnerdGene
        Green Weinies? :D
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