If you're Alan Mulally's gardener, it's probably a good time to ask the boss for a raise. The Ford Chief Executive Officer just pocketed $58.3 million in stock earlier in the month, and now his 2011 compensation has been made public – and it's increased some 11 percent.

Mulally received $29.5 million in 2011, according to The Detroit News, more than twice the next-highest-paid Ford officer cited in the report, Executive Chairman Bill Ford Jr., whose total compensation was $14.46 million. While Mulally's salary amounts to a paltry $2 million, he was paid a $5.46 million bonus, with the rest coming in "stock and option awards as well as personal expenses, which can entail personal use of private aircraft, cell phone use, security, and fuel and car washes," according to the report.

The News says Ford surpassed its profit targets in 2011, but missed other internal benchmarks.

Doing some quick math, Ford sold 5.7 million vehicles globally in 2011, meaning that Mulally pocketed $5.17 for each one.


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  • 103 Comments
      brian
      • 2 Years Ago
      Now if he could just get Lincoln whipped into shape, he might earn more... ...Oh well - Beats standing in line for a Lottery Ticket
      protovici
      • 2 Years Ago
      Forgot to mention, have you all seen what other CEO's got for companies they ran into the ground. Home Depot, GM just to name a few.
      Pandabear
      • 2 Years Ago
      He is one of the few CEO who really deserves the mega pay.
      XEVIOUS
      • 2 Years Ago
      Most of the time im on the side of no big dollars for ceo's. particularilly those that drive companies into the ground, but in this case Mullaly brought ford from the brink and has made it the second best automanufacture in the world. and thats saying alot. And to be certain, Ford hasent even reached its stride as they havent completly transitioned onto there best produced products. (model2015) But to really hit a home run, IMO ford still needs a flagship car. A full time full production corvette rival. Sure the company doesnt NEED it in a financial sence but it does need it in an image sence. everyone was shocked with the re-release of the FordGT. Shelby's are ok but too old' school, to 1960's for today's buying demographic. in fact the boss 302 and stock GT are far more of a buy than the uber powered heavy lumbering shelby's. Thankfully that all changes in 2015. And as for Mullaly.. well hes done the job rite. cant argue with that.
      Teleny411
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nobody is worth 30 million in a single year! Just think how much Ford doles out in white collar salaries, but always wants concessions from the workers.
        rtkewley
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Teleny411
        Are you on the board of directors at Ford? The compensation committee? If the answer to both of those questions is "no", then your opinion on this is COMPLETELY MEANINGLESS.
        Steveo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Teleny411
        Nobody in your world. Let's find out how many jobs he saved. What was the market value of Ford in 08 and what it is now. he got paid 30 mill but he worked for it. Imagine if somebody else would have taken his position.
      Edward
      • 2 Years Ago
      Makes me feel good about buying Toyotas.
        IBx27
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Edward
        Are you the corolla I got stuck behind doing the speed limit in the fast lane today?
        Joe
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Edward
        or the camry that was ahead of me in the left lane that kept slamming on his brakes for everything? or are you the prius who cut me off twice? you sound more like the prius
          Tiberius1701
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joe
          Nope, he is just one of the numerous propaganda believing 'Yoda owning tools.
          J
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Joe
          How did you let a Prius get in front of you? Were you texting while driving or something?
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      One of the few guys who actually deserves it.
        Mike Kilpatrick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        No one works hard enough to make $30,000,000 a year. You'd be dead.
          IBx27
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mike Kilpatrick
          Try taking a crappy company like 2007 Ford and singlehandedly turning it around. You might die from brain exhaustion, but those of us who care to work for their money would say otherwise.
          Codeman
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mike Kilpatrick
          I don't believe that one person can single-handedly turn around a poor-performing, large, international company in a few years. Sure, the decisions and actions made at the top of an organization are more significant than those made at the very bottom, but I'm not convinced they're worth more than 1000 times as much as the ones made at the bottom.
          S.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Mike Kilpatrick
          @breakfastburrito: But how much value to do those people bring to their company and stockholders? That's why Mullaly deserves his paycheck.
      Xedicon
      • 2 Years Ago
      He got paid all that money as total assets, and yet many people here act like he got handed a giant stack of cash. The VAST majority of that money is tied directly to how well Ford is doing (stocks for example) and if he screws up even a little the value of all that "money" will plummet. He also can't immediately liquidate all those assets either, and on top of that has to be incredibly careful not to get flagged for insider trading if he ever does unload some shares. Yes I understand he still got a huge amount of what amounts to cash money, but again the majority of that was a bonus tied to his and Ford's performance over the year. It's really hard for me to say the guy is overpaid for two reasons. One, Ford was in deep trouble when he arrived without the leadership to get themselves out and he took a big risk stepping up. This guy has serious balls. Two, his decisions could literally destroy the entire company and cost upwards of hundreds of thousands of people their jobs once the fallout was complete. Sound dramatic? It isn't. If Chrysler had gone under, some estimates go as high as 300,000 jobs would eventually be lost, and they're much smaller than Ford (I suspect that number might be a little high but still, wow). Try sleeping at night under that kind of pressure. At least he's doing his job extremely well - it would be a different matter entirely if he wasn't and still getting the same pay.
        Renaurd
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Xedicon
        Yes it's stock, but he can cash it in anytime and it's cash. Few people walk around with 30 million in cash, if he had been given cash he would have likely invested it. This man has made out like a bandit in the last three years, he is very wealthy, this is not the first time he's been handsomely rewarded for cutting workers pay.
      peakarach1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Pure greed.
        IBx27
        • 2 Years Ago
        @peakarach1
        This guy didn't just make money, he MADE the money by investing in his company and then completely revitalizing it to the world beating Ford we have today, versus what they were in '07 and before.
          Tiberius1701
          • 2 Years Ago
          @IBx27
          French folks do not understand free enterprise, that is the problem. Mr. Mulally is the superstar of CEOs...Period.
        TruthHertz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @peakarach1
        Based on what exactly?
          Renaurd
          • 2 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          If you don't know already it would not help to explain......
      Big Rocket
      • 2 Years Ago
      When a person does a good job, he deserves a good compensation. When a person does a great job, he deserves a great compensation. If you arbitrarily limit the pay grade to good compensation and outlaw great compensation, where is the incentive to do great? Why would any company aim for just "good enough"? GM's old management will cost taxpayers around $14 billion. Chrysler's old management cost taxpayers $1.3 billion. These numbers do not even include the automakers' captive-finance services, such as GMAC. If nothing else, Alan Mulally led Ford through the tough economy without bankruptcy and without billions in taxpayers' losses. And Mulally would never have joined Ford if there had been a wage ceiling at Ford, as some of the left-leaning Autoblog readers are advocating. And to those left-leaning readers who suggest the UAW workers deserve more credit for Ford's turnaround: That trigger you pull on a pneumatic screwdriver, that other big round button you push on a hydraulic overhead crane, none of that is even a millionth of one percent as important as the daily decisions made by Alan Mulally. And if you disagree, if you think you are underpaid, then feel free to find a new job that pays more for whatever job skills you have to offer. Nobody is forcing you to take less pay than you deserve, if you have the job skills to deserve more in the job market. Source: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20120130/AUTO01/201300393#ixzz1qi2Z2cr4 Detroit News, January 30, 2012: "At current prices, the government would lose more than $14 billion on its GM bailout. The sharp decline in GM's stock price has put the government's sale of its remaining shares on hold. The government booked a $1.3 billion loss on its $12.5 billion bailout of Chrysler." Or, if Detroit News is too conservative for your tastes, here are a couple of left-leaning sources: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/26/bailout-taxpayers_n_1233374.html Huffington Post, 01/26/12: "Among the largest bailed-out companies, American International Group Inc. still owes taxpayers around $50 billion, General Motors Co. owes about $25 billion and Ally Financial Inc. about $12 billion." Special note: Ally was GM's captive-finance service, GMAC. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/22/business/us-sheds-its-stake-in-chrysler.html NY Times, July 21, 2011: "The federal government on Thursday shed the last of its stake in Chrysler, giving majority control of the carmaker to Fiat, the Italian company, while leaving taxpayers $1.3 billion short of recovering the full investment they made two years ago to keep Chrysler from going out of business."
        Renaurd
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Big Rocket
        Baloney, pure baloney, cheap FOX News baloney.
          lol_ur_dumb
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          Ooh, great rebuttal. An ad hominem and no attempt at making an argument.
        ksrcm
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Big Rocket
        Big Rocket: "When a person does a good job, he deserves a good compensation. When a person does a great job, he deserves a great compensation." Yes. That's a carrot. Where's the stick part? Unfortunately, there's an enormous number of people in this country who completely lost the distinction between "owner" and "employee". CEOs are EMPLOYEES, just like the guy using pneumatic screw gun. And just like the guy with screw gun, if the company fails, they walk unscathed. That's the main reason why they shouldn't be paid 400 times more than a guy with screw gun. If they want a huge paycheck, they can start their own company with their own money and use their "talent" to make billions for all I care - good for them. But not as employees. "If you arbitrarily limit the pay grade to good compensation and outlaw great compensation, where is the incentive to do great?" You know, if you are doing something important only for money, everybody will be better off if you do deal drugs. Besides, no matter your talent, if you are racing just for the money, you will never win. Guys who have ALSO other motivations besides money will win. Say, BMW vs GM (for example) - you'll better believe that BMW's CEO earns on average 1/10th of what Mulally earns and what other 2 Detroit CEOs did before the stuff hit the fan. And that's the reason BMW went bankrupt while GM is making money like if it were a mint and expanding product line like if their models were rabbits. Right? "Why would any company aim for just "good enough"? " How about to continue existing as a company?
        chirowolf
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Big Rocket
        The problem has become that there ar No consequences fo doing a bad job. I live in the St.Louis area. a recent article was about the top 10 executive compensation. 7 of the 10 the companies were driven into bankruptcy by there Executives, yet they had the highrst executive compensation. good work does need to be rewarded to a point. I Ford comes up a big looser next year will he have to pay the money back? No is the answer
        Steveo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Big Rocket
        You are right on it man!
        Big Rocket
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Big Rocket
        @chirowold, ksrcm: To summarize your logic, just because someone else might screw up, then everybody, even those with a proven track record, should be penalized with a wage ceiling. If you apply that mentality in the business world, then there would be no reason for anyone to work hard, no reason to stick your neck out, and everyone should just do the bare minimum necessary to keep his or her job. That is wrong. The idealism about loving your job and working hard regardless of compensation level is just that, idealistic. It is a romantic idea that rarely happens in the real world. To your point about inept CEOs earning way too much for their inept business decisions, it is the burden of companies out there to properly vet their candidates, find a qualified CEO to do a good job, and compensate him according to his job performance. It is the same process you and I would go through in a job interview. If a company lowballs your compensation in its job offer, you would find another company to work for. Same as Alan Mulally would if Ford had a wage ceiling. And if an employee underperforms for his compensation level, then it is up to the company to replace that employee with a more qualified candidate. The same is true for you and me, the same is true for CEOs. At the risk of making my post even longer than it is already, I will just mention this in passing: Back in the old days, the Soviet Union and China implemented wage limits under the ideology of one for all and all for one. Long story short, it ended badly.
      darkness
      • 2 Years Ago
      This man makes more in 2 weeks than ill make in my life and you goons say im overpaid so what is he then?
      miles
      • 2 Years Ago
      worth every penny
        kevsflanagan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @miles
        I have to agree. Where as most CEO's just slash jobs and factories while giving themselves raise's along with every other upper management position, he went about and actually created a plausible and working business model for Ford. To beat a dead horse over and over again he did ensure Ford didn't take any form of a bailout. Yes they did take loans but not direct tax payer money. He also helped to bring about the current line up of World Ford Models we are enjoying. To him he knew business as usually wasn't going to cut it.
          TruthHertz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kevsflanagan
          Obama put limits on GM and Chrysler you low life retard. Ford didn't take a bailout or have a structured bankruptcy from the government. Ford didn't have and doesn't have compensation limits. The only reason limits were in place to begin with were because Chrysler and GM were/are GOVERNMENT OWNED. Ford never went there, hence the compensation. Forming an opinion before gathering facts... Wow, you are an excellent Obama supporter! Can't wait to cancel out your vote if you are even able. Convicts and illegals don't get the privilege.
          darkness
          • 2 Years Ago
          @kevsflanagan
          Thank god Obama put limits on compensation because i know they for a fact they wouldve raided the profits for themselves.
        darkness
        • 2 Years Ago
        @miles
        Nobody is worth that kind of money......NOBODY
          mylexicon
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          and someone in Africa believes you should have to live on $1 per day. We're all overpaid. Celebrate it, and teach other people how to make it happen, or give away all of your worldly possessions and go sleep under a bridge, which, BTW, is a better shelter than what many people are forced to live in.
          alexlivefree
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          I agree with you... but look at how the thumbs up and down are. No wonder this country is in decline.
          Tim
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          And you are...... Who now? Are you some sorta authority on an individuals self monetary worthiness? You must be related to Barack.
          Jon Bowen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @darkness
          so why shouldnt he get this kind of money? he saved a strong American company, including all the suppliers they use and keep in business. Sports and movie stars make millions and all they do is entertain us. 50 cent is worth 250 million dollars, for what? rhyming in a studio about drugs and guns?
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