Ford of Europe has started making a version of the Fiesta compact that the company says gets 71 miles per gallon on the forgiving European driving cycle, making the new Fiesta Ford's "most frugal car ever."

The car, which is being produced in Germany, is powered by a 1.6-liter diesel engine that has start-stop technology that shuts the engine down when the car is not moving. Other fuel-economy-boosting features, which are part of what Ford calls "ECOnetic Technology," include improved gear ratios, lower suspensions and low-rolling-resistance tires.

Granted, European miles per gallon figures tend to run about 20 percent higher than EPA figures, which puts the German-made Fiesta's fuel economy in the 59-mile-per-gallon range. Still, that's quite a bit more than the U.S.-built Ford Fiesta SFE, which the EPA says gets 40 mpg highway and 33 mpg combined.

Last year, Ford increased Europe unit sales by 2.4 percent to 1.58 million vehicles, or about three-quarters of Ford's U.S. sales total for 2011.
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Ford Delivers its Most Frugal Car Ever; First New Fiesta ECOnetic Technology Models Produced

Ford of Europe has started production of the new Fiesta ECOnetic Technology, its most fuel efficient and lowest CO2 emissions passenger car ever
Powered by a 1.6-litre Duratorq TDCi diesel, new Fiesta ECOnetic Technology offers fuel economy of 3.3l/100km (86mpg)* and delivers CO2 emissions of 87g/km
Half of all Ford cars sold in Europe will carry the ECOnetic Technology badge by the end of 2012, showing they are leaders or among the very best in terms of fuel economy in their segment; that will increase to two-thirds in 2013

COLOGNE, Germany, March 26, 2012 – Ford of Europe has begun production of the new Fiesta ECOnetic Technology, its most fuel-efficient car ever.

Fiesta ECOnetic Technology, offering fuel economy of 3.3l/100km (86.5mpg)* and CO2 emissions of 87g/km, is now rolling off the production line at Ford's Cologne Assembly plant in Germany.

The car is powered by a 95PS 1.6-litre Duratorq TDCi diesel engine and provides 205Nm of torque; it will be available in three-door and five-door form and in a variety of trim levels, depending on market.

"Fiesta is already hugely successful across Europe and the ECOnetic Technology model takes its fuel efficiency and low-CO2 offering to another level," said Stephen Odell, CEO and chairman, Ford of Europe. "Customers can be assured these significant gains have been achieved without compromising the great driving quality for which Ford is famous."

The new model showcases Ford ECOnetic Technology innovations like Auto-Start-Stop, Smart Regenerative Charging, Eco Mode and shift indicator light. It also benefits from a bespoke engine calibration and optimised gear ratios. A lower suspension, undershield and wheel deflectors as well as low-rolling resistance tyres are used to further reduce driving resistances.

Half of all Ford cars sold in Europe will carry the ECOnetic Technology badge by the end of 2012, showing they are leaders or among the very best in terms of fuel economy in their segment; that will increase to two-thirds in 2013. This is part of Ford's commitment to reduce CO2 emissions of its cars by 30 percent between 2006 and 2020.

# # #

*All fuel consumption and CO2 emissions figures in g/km are from officially approved tests in accordance with EC Directive 93/116/EC. Fuel economy figures quoted are based on the European Fuel Economy Directive EU 80/1268/EEC and will differ from fuel economy drive cycle results in other regions of the world.

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 164,000 employees and about 70 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com

Ford of Europe is responsible for producing, selling and servicing Ford brand vehicles in 51 individual markets and employs approximately 66,000 employees. In addition to Ford Motor Credit Company, Ford of Europe operations include Ford Customer Service Division and 22 manufacturing facilities, including joint ventures. The first Ford cars were shipped to Europe in 1903 – the same year Ford Motor Company was founded. European production started in 1911.


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  • 53 Comments
      Eideard
      • 3 Years Ago
      Always surprising to drop by a tech site and see comments from folks who don't read widely. DF is stuck in his religion. Easy to discount. Folks mumble about sufficient diesel from a bbl of crude? Realize we're now the world's largest EXPORTER of petroleum products. All coming from that barrel. More than sufficient raw stock. Conversion of transport to nat gas has already started - about 5 years for overwhelming conversion based on savings, of course. Which diminishes demand from an industry consuming 25% of oil. Small cars don't sell? Someone better tell Hyundai, Kia, Toyota, Nissan, et al. Guess they're printing those profits. Look over the fence at wider sources, folks. Oh - and ask your Audi dealer how long the waiting list is for their TDIs? Electric cars would be great - if families that work for a living could afford the initial cost. Until that changes, I look at the pretty pictures and move on.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Eideard
        Here is a link to the practicalities and percentages of different products that can be got from a barrel of oil: http://cr4.globalspec.com/thread/26624 As Poster Keith Bowers notes: 'The numbers quoted are approximately correct, but not exact nor directly applicable because that is an average. Each and every oil well produces oil with different characteristics. In most oil fields, production for the wells are similar, but not exactly the same composition. 'Heavy' crude oil, like the stuff in Saudi Arabia and Venezuela does not have enough hydrogen to balance the carbon--or too much carbon for the amount of hydrogen said the other way. The 'ideal' fuel from an emission stand point is 100% hydrogen. Coal is up to 90% carbon. The higher the ratio of hydrogen atoms to carbon atoms the 'cleaner' the fuel is. Refining process 'convert' crude oil by splitting up big molecules, removing carbon, adding hydrogen, rearranging molecules, combining small molecules, removing sulfur, nitrogen and other contaminants. Most crude oil does not have enough hydrogen relative to carbon to meet fuel specifications. U.S. refineries serve a market demand heavily weighted toward automotive gasoline. European refineries are more focused on diesel fuel production. Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) was invented during World War II to make more and higher octane gasoline by catalytically cracking bigger heavy fuel oil(C20-C50+) molecules into primarily gasoline size (C6-C9) molecules. FCC typically converts 75-85% of the feed into products smaller than the feed, with about 65-70% ending up in gasoline either directly or by combining the smaller molecules (C3-C4) with iso C4 in the Alkylation process (also developed in WWII to make very high octane aviaton gasoline.) FCC can adjust the yield pattern some, not to the yield pattern of European refineries.'
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Eideard
        'Realize we're now the world's largest EXPORTER of petroleum products. All coming from that barrel. ' It seems to have escaped your attention that oil has to be got out of the ground before it can be refined. Much of the oil the US refines is first imported, then refined and exported. Both Fox news and yourself can't get their heads around this, and absurdly imagine that there is a primary surplus of crude oil in the US.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Yeah, that is a huge dangerous misperception. Second only to the constant confusion conflation between tight oil from shale formations and oil shale (kerogen). Those two confusions cause people not to understand the difficult oil situation.
      • 3 Years Ago
      As long as American car manufacturers refuse to sell these low-mpg cars in America, I will continue to buy foreign cars.
        EVnerdGene
        • 3 Years Ago
        you mean high-MPG cars No, Americans want leather-lined 6000 pound trucks that sit 6-feet off the ground. My sister says my Insight is too small and unsafe. "My car is not too small; your car is too big."
        Kai F. Lahmann
        • 3 Years Ago
        Are other manufactures (except Toyotas Prius models) really better? With this one, the normal Prius is now on 10th place of best mileage you can get in Europe – together with three other models. In the US the Prius is still 20% ahead of everything else...
      Kai F. Lahmann
      • 3 Years Ago
      Makes the 13th European car under 90g CO2.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      but it's not green
      Edge
      • 3 Years Ago
      Most North American refineries are geared to output gas, and not diesel, and one of the main reasons, the auto manufacturers will not release diesel's here in any significant numbers.
      Edge
      • 3 Years Ago
      Diesel is worse than gas. Sure it can beat it on CO2, but it has much higher particulate matter. The stuff that causes smog. And going by VW pricing here in Canada, you pay a $2,500 premium for the diesel version of the Golf, making them rare on the roads here. No, the answer is not diesel, but electric. So who cares how many mpg this car gets, or how low it's CO2 is. Dan is right on this one.
        Mike Dimmick
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Edge
        Actually, diesel is worse, per litre of fuel, than petrol for CO2. It is more carbon-dense. It is also more energy-dense than petrol, but still more CO2 is produced per unit of energy by burning diesel than by burning petrol. Toyota are claiming 80.7 miles per imperial gallon for the upcoming Yaris Hybrid, which is a conversion of the metric figure 3.5L/100km, and 79 g/km CO2 emissions. This Fiesta is 3.3L/100km and (as it says on the door) 87 g/km CO2. That gives a CO2 figure of 2.26 kg/L for petrol and 2.64kg/L for diesel, 16.6% more emissions per litre, while the energy density is only 10.9% greater for diesel (38.6 kJ/L diesel vs 34.8kJ/L petrol, figures from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasoline#Appendix ).
          Kai F. Lahmann
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Mike Dimmick
          Right so far. But because Diesel engines have a better efficiency, you need a hybrid to get petrol engines to the same mileage and a slightly better CO2. Conventional petrol engines are very good, if they get below 100g...
        wxman
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Edge
        This "diesel has much higher particulate matter than gas" canard just will not die, will it? By the way, VOC from GASOLINE vehicles is what causes "smog".
          wxman
          • 3 Years Ago
          @wxman
          @ Rotation - Current European emission regs (Euro 5) have exactly the SAME limits for diesel vehicles than they do for gasoline vehicles (0.005 g/km - http://www.dieselnet.com/standards/eu/ld.php#stds). On top of that, diesel vehicles in Europe are required to meet a particle number standard that gasoline vehicles don't (yet), which is a good thing for them since they couldn't hit that level anyway (Walter Piock, Guy Hoffmann, Axel Berndorfer, Patrick Salemi and Bernd Fusshoeller; “Strategies Towards Meeting Future Particulate Matter Emission Requirements in Homogeneous Gasoline Direct Injection Engines.” SAE International, 2011-01-1212). I'd be glad to repost all of the other data I have on gasoline vs. diesel particulate emissions if you're interested. @ EVnerdGene - VOCs allow ozone (O3 - which is the primary constituent of "smog") to accumulate in the atmosphere, not NOx. NOx actually destroys O3 without the VOCs to interfere with the NOx photolytic cycle. This is fundamental atmospheric chemistry. Diesel fuel is virtually non-volatile, and contributes a tiny fraction of the VOCs gasoline does. Studies have shown that gasoline exhaust and vapors from gasoline fuel account for at least 50% and as much as 85% of the ambient hydrocarbon levels in urban locations. Gasoline vehicles are the primary cause of "smog".
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @wxman
          It won't die because it is true. European emissions regs still allow much higher particulate emissions for Diesels simply because they cannot meet the particulate levels of a gas car. They're getting better though. VOC from fuels is one of the contributors to smog. Diesel has VOCs also, just less of them.
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @wxman
          I saw the order of magnitude think. That seems like a whole lot of leeway to me. They couldn't possibly bring these cars into compliance before MY2107? As you see with your "barely passing" statements, car companies only do as much as they need to. If the EU doesn't require cars to pass the proper PN standard, the car companies sure won't spend the money to make it happen for 3 more years.
          EVnerdGene
          • 3 Years Ago
          @wxman
          NOx and O3 are the main contributors to smog. Besides particulates, DIEsel's #2 problem are the oxides of nitrogen. Hence; EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) - hence; decreased efficiency - hence: decreased MPG Then throw on some exhaust gas filtration = even less efficiency and MPG Then throw some pig piss (Urea) to help with the NOx problem. Then more costly engine Then more costly fuel Then heavier vehicle DIEsels emissions are being reduced at the cost of efficiency. Gas engines are cleaner and getting more efficient. Long term: DIEsel is a loser. And screw everyone that is behind me when I take-off at a traffic light as they sit in my cloud of DIEsel poop.
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @wxman
          Sorry wxman, you're right. It's the NOx that varies greatly from gas to Diesel. I saw your link on DI gas cars particulate numbers. Just because the cars tested didn't meet the tests doesn't mean gas cars can't meet the tests. 80s gas cars can't meet 2010 gas emissions, but that doesn't mean gas cars can't do it.
          wxman
          • 3 Years Ago
          @wxman
          @ Rotation, don't disagree, but if you look at Figure 1 of this paper - http://delphi.com/pdf/techpapers/2011-01-1212.pdf - referenced earlier), the particle number of mpfi generally JUST makes the limit for diesels, even if mpfi easily meets the mass PM limit (0.005 g/km). GDI doesn't make the PN limit, which is apparently why gassers are given an order-of-magnitude leeway for three years in Europe (6X10**12 particles/km). Most if not all of the car manufacturers are going to GDI in their gassers for efficiency. Diesels do tend to have higher NOx emissions, but that's offset by lower HC emissions, especially if you consider the FAR higher upstream emissions of VOCs of gasoline. It's interesting to note that the certified emissions of a Euro 6 BMW 320d EDE (diesel) is lower with respect to HC+NOx than a 2012 Prius (61 mg/kg and 64 mg/km, respectively). The 320d also has lower CO emissions, and the PM emissions are certified at 0.2 mg/km, also far below the Euro 5 or 6 PM limit (http://carfueldata.direct.gov.uk/search-new-or-used-cars.aspx?vid=29215 - 320d EDE; http://carfueldata.direct.gov.uk/search-new-or-used-cars.aspx?vid=23492 - Prius). The Prius is usually considered the standard-bearer for "clean" vehicles, but the "DIEsel" 320d is right there with it.
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'll wait to have it independently tested, I don't trust mileage figures anymore. Look at the Civic, it gets far below than the claimed numbers.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love all these reports of super high MPG cars that we'll never get here in the USA :P Real morale booster ;) I'd still take the prius over this due to our tax structure, and the fact that this car is probably a dog to drive, whereas the prius has good pep... makes sense for our tax structure, which does not penalize the use of gasoline.
      Peter
      • 3 Years Ago
      While conventional wisdom is that Americans are too cheap to buy an expensive small car, VW is selling their diesels as fast as they unload, and with future competition from the diesel Cruze, I am not sure that is true anymore. This (3,3 l/100Km) one ups the Prius (3,9 l/100km extra urban in the UK). It also one ups the Hyndai 1.6 diesel which is rated at 4,1 l/100km in the i30 (Elantra)
        Mike Dimmick
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Peter
        The Prius is substantially larger - it competes with the Ford Mondeo, two car classes larger than the Fiesta. It's also quicker than this Fiesta, sub-11 seconds to 100km/h while the Fiesta achieves it in 12.9s (data from ford.co.uk). Toyota's upcoming Yaris Hybrid - the same size - is claimed to achieve 3.5 L/100km, which in terms of fuel energy density is actually better than this Fiesta. Whether it's cheaper to run depends on the prices in your country: at the moment, where I live, the Yaris would cost £4.93 per 100km while the Fiesta would cost £4.91/100km (140.9p per litre for petrol, 148.9p for diesel). That's a small enough difference that I'll take the hybrid's lower emissions - and I do more urban than motorway driving anyway. The Yaris is at least price-competitive too: a 5-door Fiesta Edge ECOnetic is £15,045 while Toyota are targeting under £15,000 for their base specification, which will be 5-door.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Peter
        There is a limit to how much diesel you can get when refining a barrel of oil. Not enough to support the US using it at the same rate as Europe, I believe. The balance at the moment is obtainable by trading.
      YellowZx5
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have a Fiesta and think some of the tech in Europe should be brought over. I could care less about diesel, but I'll take a hybrid based Fiesta to kick in the teeth of that Prius C.
      guyverfanboy
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's a damn shame that this is highly unlikely to come to the US.
        EVnerdGene
        • 3 Years Ago
        @guyverfanboy
        yes; if you are for cleaner air vehicles, or less CO2; then DIEsel is not the answer.
          wxman
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          If you are for cleaner air vehicles, diesel is EXACTLY the answer.
          Smith Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          AMEN!
          guyverfanboy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          Sorry, I have to respectfully disagree. I rather have a fuel efficient diesel over a gasoline auto any day of the week. Electric vehicles aren't perfect either.
      Rotation
      • 3 Years Ago
      This puppy would be about 50mpg on the US system, not 59. It might be a little lower if the start-stop system isn't valued as strongly in the US system. Either way, you're looking at a vehicle which costs more than a Prius or Prius C to run. Not exactly jump for joy time. Well, unless you drive exclusively highway miles, in which case this is the car for you.
        guyverfanboy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Wrong. Converting imperial gallons to US gallons makes this 59 mpg US.
          guyverfanboy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @guyverfanboy
          Ford of Europe has started making a version of the Fiesta compact that the company says gets 71 miles per gallon on the forgiving European driving cycle, making the new Fiesta Ford's "most frugal car ever." ^Autoblog Green should correct this sent to say 87 mpg, and not 71. Hence, the confusion.
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @guyverfanboy
          You don't just convert imperial gallons to US gallons to figure out what the mpg would be on the US system. They are entirely different systems. A Prius gets 72.4mpg on the EU system. Converting from Imperial to US gallons that is about 58mpg. But we know the Prius is the same vehicle in both countries and only gets 50mpg on the US combined cycle in US gallons. The EU cycle simply is more optimistic. So I adjusted for that, as you should. Besides, the 71mpg IS in US gallons already. If you look in the press release you see the mpg figure in Imperial gallons is 86.5 (combined cycle)!
        Peter
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        What matters is the real world consumption of oil, and what you get from consuming it. While the horsepower might be similar to the Prius C the toque in this puppy is 200Nm which means it won't take 11 seconds to get to 60. And it drives, dare I say it, like a Ford and not a Prius. If the Prius C sells (and it does big time) bring in this competition and let the market decide. Many of us drive more highway than city and would consider this option if it was priced similarly (and Ford certainly has enough room to do so). After all if VW group is having trouble keeping up shipping its Diesels in at their price point ($24K for the Jetta) why would Ford struggle moving Diesels at $18,000?
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Peter
          You say what's important is real world consumption of oil and then you say "but this one is faster". The Prius C uses less oil per mile when you take into account the higher amount of oil in a gallon of Diesel versus gas. I don't know where you get $18K from. You can barely get a regular Fiesta for that. The higher fuel economy versions cost more in Europe, and they'll cost more here too. You'd be lucky to get away below $20K.
          Greg
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Peter
          The going price for a Fiesta SE is around $16k. Dropping that engine in might add $3k. Ford could undercut the Prius C, but it's much more likely they would simply match the price.
        Edge
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        > "This puppy would be about 50mpg on the US system, not 59." Probably the same 50 mpg that Fiat 500 owners were suppose to get with their advanced multi-air engines.
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