The highly anticipated 2013 Scion FR-S – the sister car of the Subaru BRZ and Toyota GT 86 – goes on sale this spring, and the automaker's website now shows that the cost of entry will be $24,930 including destination. That base price gets you an FR-S equipped with a six-speed manual transmission, though Scion's site doesn't yet say what the cost will be for cars equipped with the six-speed automatic.

As we already know, the FR-S is equipped with a 2.0-liter boxer four that sends 200 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque exclusively to the rear wheels. And just yesterday, we learned that the FR-S is good for 22/30 miles per gallon (city/highway) with the manual transmission, or 25/34 mpg with the automatic 'box. We've already had a chance to drive Scion's new sport coupe, and while it's certainly not the most powerful vehicle in the class, we found it to have excellent balance and declared it a more engaging steer than vehicles like the Honda Civic Si and Hyundai Genesis Coupe.

Head over to Scion's website for more information.

UPDATE: Scion has issued its official press release, stating that the 2013 FR-S starts from $24,200, which obviously does not include the $730 destination charge wrapped into the MSRP shown on the automaker's consumer site. What's more, Scion's press blast reveals that cars equipped with an automatic transmission will command $1,100 more, or $26,030 including destination. Follow the jump to read the official release.
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Scion Announces Pricing for Its 2013 FR-S Sports Car

• Rear-Wheel Drive Sports Car starts at $24,200
• Low center of gravity and lightweight design achieves a "Pure Balance"
• World's first boxer engine to utilize Toyota's D-4S direct and port injection system
• FR-S comes standard with complimentary Scion Service Boost

TORRANCE, Calif., March 22, 2012 – Scion today announced pricing for its 2013 FR-S compact rear-wheel drive sports car. The FR-S starts with a manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) of $24,200 when equipped with a six-speed manual transmission, and $25,300 when equipped with a six-speed automatic transmission that features paddle shifters and rev-match technology. The high-performance coupe is the fifth model to join the Scion family and will go on sale this spring.

"Scion's goal was to create an affordable sports car that true driving enthusiasts could enjoy," said Jack Hollis, Scion vice president. "We accomplished that goal with the FR-S starting under $25,000...a total home run! Add in Scion's complimentary Scion Service Boost, our no-haggle no-hassle Pure Price, and Scion's network of about 1,000 dealers, and the FR-S is a grand slam."

Pure Balance

The FR-S, which stands for Front-engine, Rear-wheel drive, Sport; is Scion's definition of an authentic rear-wheel-drive sports car with exceptionally balanced performance and handling, compelling style, flexible utility and surprising fuel efficiency.

The FR-S is a true "scion," born into a lengthy history of Toyota performance cars and motorsports. During planning and development, it was most inspired by the AE86 generation of the Corolla, better known as the Hachi-Roku, meaning "8-6" in Japanese. The AE86 was a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive coupe that was lightweight and well balanced, making it a solid choice for driving enthusiasts.

Inspired by the AE86, the FR-S is designed around the core goal of achieving "Pure Balance." The balance begins with the strategic use of the world's only flat boxer engine in a front-engine, rear-wheel drive configuration. The engine's compact size and flat shape allow it to be mounted mid-ship and extremely low, giving the car a dynamically favorable front-to-rear weight ratio of 53:47 and a low center of gravity comparable to some exotic supercars.

The FR-S's 2.0-liter, naturally aspirated four-cylinder engine is the result of a joint development between Toyota and Subaru. The partnership begins by combining Subaru's newly developed, horizontally opposed engine and Toyota's cutting edge D-4S injection system that incorporates both direct and port injection. The D-4S system, partnered with a high 12.5:1 compression ratio, results in an impressive 200 horsepower and 151 pound-feet of torque.

The flat-four mates with either a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic transmission. The manual offers quick, precise shifts with a short-throw; while the automatic features aggressive up shifts and sporty rev-matched down shifts that are initiated by steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. Power is transferred to the pavement via a standard Torsen® limited-slip differential.

The idea of "Pure Balance" is further realized by the FR-S's lightweight design and compact size. The combination allows the car to be quick and nimble into and out of corners, with dynamic maneuverability and confident handling. The coupe's weight is kept to a minimum by utilizing a lightweight aluminum hood, a solid roof, and by featuring a trunk design instead of a hatchback.

The FR-S's low weight is matched with a dynamically tuned suspension setup consisting of MacPherson struts up front and a double wishbone system in the rear. Lightweight 17-inch alloy wheels and ventilated disc brakes are standard on all four corners.

Powerful Exterior Design

The fierce exterior of the FR-S is a solid reflection of its inner power. The profile, inspired by the Toyota 2000GT, reveals a hood and roof-line that is remarkably sleek and low, giving it an aerodynamic shape that channels air cleanly over to the top. The low stance continues to exaggerate the coupe's menacing face, which is made up of sharp lines, a wide mouth and angular headlights that house the projector-beam halogen lamps. The aggressive front fenders protrude upward and boast the iconic '86' piston emblem, which highlights the car's AE86 heritage as well as its unique new boxer engine. The rear fascia sits low and wide, with aerodynamic lower treatments that surround the sporty dual exhaust system. LEDs illuminate the edgy taillights, while center-mounted backup lights finish the muscular design.

The FR-S will be available in seven colors including Raven, Asphalt, Hot Lava, Argento, Ultramarine, Firestorm and Whiteout.

Performance-Focused Interior

The FR-S's interior includes a 2+2 seating configuration that is designed with both form and function in mind. The front seats feature deep bolsters and are mounted extremely low and are comfortable yet assertive, while the rear seat folds down flat, creating flexible space. The car will come standard with FR-S badged floor mats. The large center-mounted tachometer is the focus of the three-gauge cluster and features a programmable shift-indicator, informing the driver of the engine's vitals. Speed is monitored by both digital and analog gauges. The FR-S features a sporty leather-trimmed steering wheel that has both tilt and telescopic adjustment.

The FR-S will come standard with an eight-speaker AM/FM/CD/USB 300-watt maximum output Pioneer™ audio system. Standard features also include HD Radio™ technology and Bluetooth® connectivity that allows both hands-free phone connection as well as streaming audio capability.

Sports Car Performance with Excellent Safety Features

FR-S comes standard with six airbags, including dual-stage advanced driver- and front-passenger airbags, front-seat-mounted airbags and side-curtain airbags.

Like all Scions, FR-S features the Star Safety System that includes Traction Control (TRAC), Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD), Enhanced Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Brake Assist (BA), an Anti-lock Braking System (ABS), and Smart Stop Technology (SST).

The delivery, processing and handling (DPH) fee for all Scion models is $730 and is not included in the MSRP. DPH fee for vehicles distributed by Southeast Toyota (SET) and Gulf States Toyota (GST) may vary.

Like all Scion models, the FR-S is covered by a 3-year/36,000-mile comprehensive warranty and a 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain warranty. The FR-S will come standard with Scion Service Boost, a complimentary plan covering normal factory-scheduled maintenance for two years or 25,000 miles, whichever comes first, and two years of 24-hour roadside assistance.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 260 Comments
      Jason Golden
      • 2 Years Ago
      The FR-S and BR-Z aren't going to appeal to everyone, but they surely will hit a sweet spot for those drivers who appreciate the RWD setup and chassis dynamics... similar to a Miata (agile, light, not fast but no slug either). I had hoped to see starting prices about $2,000 less, but these new twins still represent a decent value for those who like their flavor.
        MKIV
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jason Golden
        Price did have the potential to be lower but I think with the Japanese Yen exchange rate they probably had to price it a bit higher to make up the difference.
          SatinSheetMetal
          • 2 Years Ago
          @MKIV
          So essentially an American company could make this exact same car cheaper? Wonder if Ford or GM are taking notes?
      David Hu
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just because a person cross-shops a Mustang, a Genesis, and an FR-S doesn't make them comparable. I'd cross-shop a A6 Avant, an X5, right along with a Forester or a 4-door GTi...but that's just me trying to maximize my needs/desires with my budget. If a car justifies the higher cost for me, then I'd buy it; if not, then I'd save the money with a more affordable car. Doesn't in any way make it make sense to compare one to another. The only car currently on the market that is a direct competitor to the FR-S is the Miata, even if you count the coupe/roadster difference. As much as I love the Miata, the FR-S delivers 33 more hp, 11lb-ft more torque, and 2mpg more on the highway, all while being less than 100lbs heavier than the Miata (less if you compare to the folding hardtop version). If I were in the market for one, this would be a serious contender for a hard-top Miata. For the target audience of the Miata (as ANY true Miata driver would tell you) and the FR-S, the utmost important criteria is the fun-to-drive factor. Dependability and affordability are great bonuses (which, I expect, will be the case for the FR-S), but really, all else is a distance second. Those who doubt this only needs to do one thing: drive a Miata (personal advice: try the 1st gen). It'll likely be the first time you had so much fun driving that you could care less whether it is climate-controlled, has heated seats, 18" wheels, dents on the doors, or snot coming out of your nose because you have the top down, heater on, and freezing wind numbing your ears. Yes, it's THAT much fun and if the FR-S is as good as that, then that's $25k well spent.
        k_m94
        • 2 Years Ago
        @David Hu
        Exactly. Nobody seems to really care that the Miata has less than 170 horsepower and isn't dirt cheap, it takes the philosophy of driving a slow car fast=fun and maximizes it by giving telepathic steering, an amazing chassis, and bucketloads of soul so that you couldn't care less what more efficient or vastly faster machines you could get for the money. If the FR-S taps into this category it would be monumental, it has ballpark numbers to suggest it could be the second coming of the Honda S2000, but cheaper, hardtop, and with rear seats. Or maybe it's a lighter, more reliable, and vastly more efficient Mazda RX8. If it doesn't quite achieve the same kind of cult status, it's bound to compete in the # per dollar value sportscar class, where it will likely fail against higher firepower, better equipped, or more versatile weaponry.
        Silentnoise713
        • 2 Years Ago
        @David Hu
        You are mixing top down driving nostalgia with driving excitement. The Miata offers both which the FR-S currently does not. I think (haven’t driven on yet) the FR-S will give you the racy white knuckle excitement. Put a drop top on it (weaker chassis and all) and will really overtake the Miata. -Former 1.6 NA owner and loved every minute.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Silentnoise713
          [blocked]
          David Hu
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Silentnoise713
          Actually, I wouldn't be surprised if Toyota already has plans for a drop-top version of the FR-S. They'll probably wait to see how the FR-S performs on the market. But, yes, if it came in a drop-top and is at least as fun to drive as the Miata, then it'll be mind-blowing. In the meantime, the (PRHT) Miata is still the closest competitor to the FR-S.
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      If you're looking for best-in-class horsepower, then look elsewhere. For those that are more interested in handling than ultimate drag performance, this seems like it could very well be the car for you. The price for the Scion version ain't too bad as long as it comes fairly well loaded even in base trim. Sure it would have been nice if it was a little cheaper, but it is, what it is. I'm more curious now to hear what the Subaru version will go for since supposedly its a slightly higher spec car.
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      I was thinking about this car earlier today... You constantly see guys comparing it to the Mustang for some reason even though they fit opposite sites of the performance spectrum. You also see people bring up the Miata which to me seems like a much closer car to compare it to. But how come no one brings up the car that, I think at least, its the most like... the Mazda RX8? The two both have small displacement engines that produce very similar power numbers and typically produce that power higher up in the rev-range. They both are aimed more at the handling-crowd than the pure numbers-crowd. They are both considered fairly lightweight. And while they are both performance coupes, they still try to have some level of practicality to them. Even to this day, as a fairly old design, the RX8 still gets praised for its handling ability and all the previews for the FRS/BRZ tend to do the same. The RX8 and the Toyobaru have essentially the same torque rating, but the RX8 actually makes more horsepower, but weights in at some ~300 lbs more. When you factor in that weight, the FRS/BRZ has actually a slightly better power-to-weight ratio and a better torque-to-weight ratio. In the end, it looks to me like this car will (hopefully) handle at least as good as the RX8, but be even (slightly) faster, and cost a couple of grand less, while still getting 30-40% better fuel economy (which was one of the RX8s biggest problems). Seems to me that there is lots of WIN with this new car. And if you don't like it, well then there are plenty of other cars out there for you to spend your money on.
        cjv998
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        The only reason I can think of, regarding why people don't compare this to the RX-8, is the fact that the RX-8 is on its way out the door (I believe this is its last model year, but I could be wrong). Other than that, I agree about the two cars sounding like a close match.
        PatrickH
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        The RX8 would decimate this car on a road course. In my eyes they are not comparable.
          Hazdaz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PatrickH
          So you are saying that you've driven both of these cars and know from experience?? Since I am pretty sure that you HAVEN'T driven the new Toyobaru, and you are talking out of your ass, maybe you should wait till this car actually hits the street before saying that one would "decimate" the other. I am sure the RX8 is a great handler, but when you hear/read comments and videos from folks that actually have driven this car and they start to compare it to cars like Boxster, then you KNOW this can is going to be fun to drive.
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        How well did the RX8 do, sales-wise? (serious question - I just get the impression it didn't meet expectations). I do think the Mustang and Camaro will most likely be cross-shopped with this car as others have said. In that sense, it is comparable or is competing with them. Even car guys are already doing it. Other than that, I generally agree with you.
          Hazdaz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @A_Guy
          The RX8 did not sell well at all. Read J.D. McFarland's post below and see why. Sure, some people are more interested in ultimate drag performance, but one of the main reasons that people kept away from the RX8 was its god awful gas mileage and its terrible reliability. I think that's one of the reasons why automotive journalists liked the car so much - they didn't have to buy it, didn't have to pay to fill it up and didn't have to worry about repairs. Take those issues away, and supposedly it was a hugely fun car. I would be wrong, but this new FRS has many of the same positives as the RX8, but few of its negatives (probably the main one being fairly low torque, but it "should" be reliable, cheap to fill up, and really not that expensive to buy).
      CarCrazy24
      • 2 Years Ago
      Curious what kind of premium the BR-Z will command over this
      mchlrus1
      • 2 Years Ago
      Mpg automatic (>) manual, what!
        k_m94
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mchlrus1
        Not surprising. Automatics can shift whenever is most economical during fuel econ testing, while manuals are forced to shift at set speeds, making them perform worse on the tests. In reality, even some of the most conservative shifting automatics lose out on mpg to equal ratioed manuals if driven and shifted well due to parasitic losses. In addition, it appears the auto may have a longer final drive ratio, lowering cruising rpm to boost mpg but feeling slower and more sluggish. EPA MPG be damned, you dont get a car like this and go with a slushbox, not unless it was a fantastic paddle shift versus a poorly designed manual riddled with issues that take the fun out of rowing your own. Or if you absolutely do not know how to use manual and refuse to learn in which case, why get a dedicated sportscar?
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @k_m94
          The EPA is full of it anyway. I have a manual Golf TDI rated at 30/42. Most of the time I'm getting 41 to 45 mpg average in it and I'm not driving 100% highway (100% will get me 48 to 53). I don't remember the last time I saw less than 40 mpg average. Point being, the EPA was more than just a little bit off. I'll check fuelly and fueleconomy.gov once this car comes out and see what people are really getting :)
      EverythingBagel
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't think anyone complaining about how a Mustang or Camaro has a V6 for the price would be seriously interested in this car anyway. I for one, am hugely interested in the FR-S but would not ever consider those two.
        SatinSheetMetal
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EverythingBagel
        So your post basically boils down to; People who cross shop this with the mustang aren't very interested in this car (presumably because they see what the mustang has to offer), I however am very interested in this car, because I haven't considered any alternatives. Sounds smart.
        A_Guy
        • 2 Years Ago
        @EverythingBagel
        But you also only eat bagels and never consider other food. :)
      Your Highness
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's impressive, I'll give them that. But comparing Mustangs and Camaros to this doesn't seem like the most proper fit. People will probably cross-shop them, but honestly, I feel this is more intended to challenge the Miata better. I also wonder how this will affect tC sales though. Still, I want the Subaru more. I just like it's styling a little more.
        regionrat
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Your Highness
        Or a Camaro fighter. I mean, hello, it weighs HALF as much.
          Ron
          • 2 Years Ago
          @regionrat
          Weights half as much, is much smaller, makes 1/3rd less horse power, makes half as much torque, and still gets the same gas mileage.... :D
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Your Highness
        [blocked]
        nickms3
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Your Highness
        I feel this will get cross shopped by anything sporty in that price range. Civic Si, MS3, WRX and so on. Mustangs and Camaros included. They may not be direct competitors but they definitely compete indirectly. For a lot of people the RWD will be the determining factor but I feel the majority are going to want more power that the other cars offer at a comparative price regardless of which wheels do the driving.
      Silentnoise713
      • 2 Years Ago
      Darn, no edit. On 2nd though. Since this car appeals to enthusiast and is really impractical 'family' car, they figure this is the price people are willing to pay to play.?.
      Dax Überlegen Grove
      • 2 Years Ago
      SOOOO overpriced. what features do you get for 24,930 + tax so more like $27500. You get a scion (wow) you get 200hp and 150lb of tq. (holy **** i think my blender has more hp) you get a well balanced rwd car (only feature, but without the power its going to be boring as hell to rip around corners.) This car would be a nice deal for 19,999. over 20 is rediculous and i have a feeling the public is going to speak with their wallets after initial sale to enthusiast happens
        flammablewater
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dax Überlegen Grove
        Boring as hell to rip around corners? You realize that power has nothing to do with how fast you can go around a corner, right? They're the opposite.
        k_m94
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dax Überlegen Grove
        25K is spot on for a lightweight RWD sportscar with 200hp. It's less expensive, more powerful, and seats more than a Miata while weighing similarly, and we all know how successful that particular roadster is: constant production for like 20 years, enough to see the rise and fall of many supposed "better" sporty roadsters. So think of this as a better value proposition to a Miata, or priced competitively against many worse driving 200hp FWD econocars like the Civic Si, Golf GTI. Only time will tell if its setup is enough to put it in sacred Boxter, Miata, S2000, and Elise levels of pure, handling over power sportscardom, which makes comparisons against more powerful and heavier cars like the Genesis, Camaro, Mustang, and 370Z really pointless.
          Dax Überlegen Grove
          • 2 Years Ago
          @k_m94
          let's put some money down that 2013 genesis will defiantly beat this light weight enthusiast car in any track. 200hp wouldn't be that bad if it had 200tq aswell. 150 is just embaracing, I expect more from honda vtec motors. this is a boxer 4, traditionally torque leaning motors.
          Rob Gomes
          • 2 Years Ago
          @k_m94
          >200hp wouldn't be that bad if it had 200tq swell. That means peak HP would be at 5252rpm, or that the engine would rev substantially higher while peak torque long fell off a cliff. HP is a function of torque. You're asking for either forced induction or a engine with a nearly unusable power band.
          Donny Hoover
          • 2 Years Ago
          @k_m94
          Let's not get too excited. The Miata starts at 23,5 and there's a good 200 lb weight difference. Still, this car is pretty good. I wonder how much weight you can cut by tossing the spare tire, jack, back seats, other crap you don't need.
      simianspeedster
      • 2 Years Ago
      Toyota and Subaru should be commended for building such a focused car in today's world of style over substance. This car represents the soul of everything good in a true sports car: it's simple, light, balanced, purposeful, rear wheel drive and it comes with a manual transmission. That's 90% of what matters -- the rest is in the tuning. I find the styling to be interesting in and out and generally fresh without being garish. And the price is completely fair. How much was a Celica GT-S in 2012 dollars? $25K isn't dirt cheap, but it's far from expensive. Many Priuses sell for over $25K. Surely there will be more powerful and maybe even slightly faster cars near this price point, but none of them will have the focus and feel of this car. Read the recent C&D review and take note of how much work Toyobaru put into lowring the center of gravity in this car through engine design and placement. It's details like these that suggest this will be successful and put smiles on the faces of people who appreciate old school sports cars. For many, this car will also be a blank canvas -- some will get ruined and others will improve on the car. It'll be fun to watch. If you think this car is too expensive or you think a Mustang V6 is a better deal, you really don't get this car.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @simianspeedster
        [blocked]
          Logan W
          • 2 Years Ago
          How look at pricing and its RWD and V6!! Sooo how is this not into the same segment of car?
        jase.s
        • 2 Years Ago
        @simianspeedster
        The proposed pricing for the car was under $20k. The price rose more than 25% since it's conception. That's quite a bit more than I was hoping to pay for it. What's more interesting, the Prius C has much more technology (much more expensive technology, I might add) and still has a base price of under $20k. I'm a lifelong Toyota fan, but this is a little disappointing.
          gary
          • 2 Years Ago
          @jase.s
          It's probably no coincidence that 25% is about how much the dollar/yen ratio has changed in the past 3 years.. I feel you're pain, this would be awesome at $20k....but looking at comps in the market, $25k seems fair and reasonable.
      Baltojeff
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'll make you a deal. For EXACTLY the same strarting money, you can keep the more "engaging" steering and I'll enjoy the view of your car from the rear view mirror of my Hyundai Genesis Coupe. With 74 more horses and *124*!! more torques, this car is bringing a pen-knife to a gunfight.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Baltojeff
        Oh for fücks sake, its foot-lbs of torque, not "torques". You're not Jeremy Clarkson. If you want to brag on the internet about something, at least learn what goddamn units that thing which you are bragging about is in. Newton-meters would also been a correct use of units.
        torqued
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Baltojeff
        Deal. You go buy yourself a Hyundai with bigger HP numbers and feel good about yourself. I'll buy the car that's more "enjoyable to drive" and drive it. We'll both be happy and go our separate ways. By the way, go checkout the Camry. It's got 68 more horses and more interior room.
        Burabus
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Baltojeff
        too bad the genesis is still ugly
        Hashiryu
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Baltojeff
        with 74 horse, 124 more ft-lbs **and** 500+lbs of fat.
          kcroc10077
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hashiryu
          @Baltojeff Check your numbers. The Mustang GT is closer to 8.6 lbs/hp. 3602 lb/420 hp=8.6 lb/hp http://buyersguide.caranddriver.com/ford/mustang/2013/ford-mustang-gt-coupe-boss-302/specs
          Baltojeff
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hashiryu
          True, it is heavier, but the Scion carries 12.98 lb/hp and the Gen carries 12.27 lb/hp. (The Mustang GT carries 11.3 lb/hp). Ultimately, almost twice the torques are going to come into play way more often in even remotely normal driving than the weight differential.
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