After years of lackluster sales, Mercedes-Benz is finally pulling the plug on the company's R-Class, at least as far as sales in the United States go. The vehicle will continue to be manufactured at the Mercedes-Benz plant in Tuscaloosa, Alabama and exported to markets around the globe.

According to Yahoo! Autos, the company has sold just 300 R-Class units nationwide through March of this year despite the fact that the German automaker is having no trouble moving any of its larger SUV models. With R-Class sales bumbling along, Mercedes-Benz says it simply can't maintain a business case for selling the overgrown wagon in the States.

As of right now, the company will continue to produce the R-Class through 2015 for sale in Mexico, Canada and China. After that date, Mercedes-Benz will likely replace the vehicle with a new creation based on the bones of the current M-Class.


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  • 63 Comments
      Ernie Mccracken
      • 2 Years Ago
      I always thought the R-class looked good, but I know everyone else hates it. The R320 CDI has to be the best family car ever.
      regionrat
      • 2 Years Ago
      I swear I read a side-by-side comparo years ago of this model with Mercedes's SUV equivalent at the time, and this won hands down in practically every category. America's hatred of wagons claims yet another life. (Although this was pretty ugly, too.)
        WillieD
        • 2 Years Ago
        @regionrat
        This isn't a wagon.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @WillieD
          [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @regionrat
        [blocked]
      NightFlight
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sad, this was one of the greatest road trip vehicles I've ever driven/ridden in. Northern VA to the Florida Keys and back in a R500 packed full of gear and people, and no one complained. Got great gas mileage given its weight and V8, and the seats are supremely comfortable, including the third row.
      waetherman
      • 2 Years Ago
      I always thought it was brave of Mercedes to actually make a minivan, and I always liked the styling of it. But obviously America loves its tough-looking SUVs more than anything else, even of the van is more practical.
      jonnybimmer
      • 2 Years Ago
      Americans making Mercedes for the Chinese... What a weird world we live in.
        RGT881
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jonnybimmer
        Valid point. R-Class, much like the Phaeton have not been successful anywhere in the world other lukewarm sales in China.
          RGT881
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RGT881
          ***other than lukewarm sales in China
      Spellchecker
      • 2 Years Ago
      I wish people would be a bit more open-minded here. All to often people don't like the look of a car and then call it a "POS". I hear it all the time from supposed "car enthusiasts". Some "car enthusiast" calls a Citroen 2CV a "POS" because it looks different and without knowing how advanced or the positive impact that car had. Yeah, those are real "car enthusiasts" - NOT. First, the R-Class is an MPV. The minivans in the Mercedes lineup are the Viano/Vito class vans (they even have sliding doors!). I don't consider the R-Class to be a crossover at all, it's an MPV. M P V. Period. Second, I used to work at an MB dealer and drove a lot of their cars. I also drove the R320 CDI 4Matic - and I liked it. It was roomy, comfortable, handled surprisingly well for such a large barge and the diesel engine had power and acceleration. The leg space in the rear was generous to. It was the perfect family car / long-distance cruiser. However, at the time I felt that an E-Class wagon was a better choice because it was more manageable in a tight European city and offered also enough space and practicality and optional AWD. I liked the R-Class from a driving point of view. Once again, I thought that it felt solid and stable at high speeds on the Autobahn, it had great steering feedback and a compliant suspension that allowed for comfortable driving with safe and responsive handling. But most importantly, they were spacious and offered top safety and comfort. A great car. I could see the appeal. Maybe people should drive these cars first before they comment on them. And just because someone doesn't appreciate a design doesn't make the car bad. Personally I think Toyota Camry's are butt ugly - always have been - yet they're undeniably good cars.
      pickles
      • 2 Years Ago
      I shopped hard for one of these used. They are an EXCELLENT buy that way- as they depreciate like a rock. The bust for me was that the build quality was weak (trim dangling from the drivers' seat and loose other stuff -at 38k miles) and tedious complexity of Command were simply not up to snuff. Plus, I was looking for room. As the longest vehicle MB sells here, I expected great space- but tipping all the seats 'flat' leaves gross gaps and the cargo space is still filled with... folded seats, unlike a good wagon or a great mini van. When it was all done, I got more vehicle with.. a shorter, more nimble Sienna. So, if MB wanted to compete, this was an odd one. A real, uncompromising, premium van could be more popular
      Adrian Elliot
      • 2 Years Ago
      Color me shocked.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      CarCrazy24
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not surprised, besides the option of a diesel these were pointless when cars like the GL are offered. Maybe if it wasn't styled to look worse than a mini-van, I think it would have done better.
      flychinook
      • 2 Years Ago
      Honest question here: If the car is being built anyways, and doesn't have to be imported, why cancel it? What is the hidden cost here, that can't be recovered by selling even a handful? The ad budget for the car has always been zero, and they're just going on the same transport trucks as other Mercedes models anyways. Where is the harm?
        BG
        • 2 Years Ago
        @flychinook
        It might be the long-term cost liability: the manufacturer has to guarantee that parts will be available for a certain number of years. Also, dealer mechanics have to be trained, possibly software has to be updated. I think a modern car can cost the manufacturer in small (or sometimes not-so-small) ways for many years.
          flychinook
          • 2 Years Ago
          @BG
          Ah, I hadn't thought about the parts availability bit. Even without the parts changing, I guess that could add up quickly.
      af_1
      • 2 Years Ago
      There are a ton of these in Manhattan, but I can't say I've really seen many outside of there.
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