From Mexico to Canada – or from Canada to Mexico, whichever way your heart desires – a West Coast journey in the U.S. is one step closer to reality for plug-in vehicle drivers.
Today, the first part of the West Coast Electric Highway was officially opened in Salem, OR. The idea is to put in enough fast chargers along Interstate 5 to allow EV drivers to just get in their cars and go. The distance between the stations is around 25 miles. Today's announcement means that the first eight chargers, all from Aerovironment, are now operational. Even better, for a "limited time," it does not cost any money to refill your battery. Each charging station includes one Level 2 and one DC fast charger.

As we reported last summer, Aerovironment has been installing the chargers for a while, with the eventual plan being to cover the entire 1,350-mile length of I-5. This should be completed by the end of 2012. Spurs leading off from I-5 – into cities like Portland – are also planned. The Oregon Department of Energy is spending $915,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (i.e., stimulus) funds to build the stations. If you're interested in using the chargers, click here.

Ashley Horvat, who works on the project for the State of Oregon, told CBS News that, "We are hoping we are setting the stage for what will become the first highway, but not necessarily the only highway that is electrified." While no highway in the U.S. has chargers installed along its entire length just yet, a network of chargers at Cracker Barrel restaurants in centrel Tennessee does offer another EV corridor. And Tesla Motors is talking about building a network of SuperChargers for its all-electric vehicles.
Show full PR text
West Coast Electric Highway Helps Kick the Gas Habit With First Electric Vehicle Fast-Charging Stations Along Interstate 5

"Fast" electric vehicle (EV) charging stations from AeroVironment now open along I-5 in Southern Oregon, enabling convenient long-distance electric vehicle travel
AeroVironment will provide free charging to EV owners for a limited time

SALEM, Ore., March 16, 2012 – Cruising the open road is now a little closer to reality for electric vehicle owners in the Pacific Northwest.

Today, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), along with charging station partner AeroVironment (NASDAQ: AVAV) and the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE), opened the first phase of the West Coast Electric Highway, which is anticipated to eventually stretch along Interstate 5 from the Canadian to Mexican borders. The charging station hubs introduced today will provide electric vehicle (EV) owners access to a network of electric "refueling" stations along a major transportation artery in southern Oregon.

"As the first state in the nation to establish an EV charging infrastructure along a major interstate, Oregon is leading the EV pathway and supporting adoption of the next phase in the evolution of transportation," said Pat Egan, chair of the Oregon Transportation Commission and vice president of customer and community affairs for Pacific Power. "Once Oregon's segment of the West Coast Electric Highway is completed, EV drivers will be able to travel from Ashland to Portland at a fraction of the cost of filling a gas tank and with no direct emissions."

The West Coast Electric Highway will eventually allow EV drivers to travel from San Diego to Vancouver, B.C. without relying on carbon-based fuel. "Fast" charging stations, included at each of the newly operational locations, can provide a full charge for an EV in less than 30 minutes; soon, these stations will dot interchanges up and down I-5.

"Plug-in vehicles are increasing in popularity, with many new models coming to market in 2012," said Art James, senior project executive with the Oregon Department of Transportation. "We wanted to develop state-of-the-art charging infrastructure to support them, and AeroVironment has helped us provide Oregon EV owners the ability to travel from community to community."

Spaced at roughly 25-mile intervals along the southern Oregon I-5, the AeroVironment charging stations are available at convenient locations in Cottage Grove, Rice Hill, Roseburg, Canyonville, Wolf Creek, Grants Pass, Central Point, and Ashland. Each location has two charging stations including one DC "fast" charger. Plans call for more than 40 additional charging stations from AeroVironment to be operational in Oregon and Washington by the end of the year.

"With the price of gas increasing, Oregon wants to provide more transportation alternatives," said Oregon Department of Energy Director Bob Repine. "It's important that Oregonians have clean transportation options."

ODOE awarded ODOT $915,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (stimulus) funding through ODOE's State Energy Program to install the network of EV charging stations.

Electric vehicle drivers will be able to activate access to the charging stations by signing up for AV's Charging Network at evsolutions.com/avnetwork or by calling toll-free at 888-833-2148. Once enrolled, EV drivers will receive an AV Network key fob that will allow access to all AeroVironment chargers along the West Coast Electric Highway. AeroVironment is also providing free charging for a limited time, giving EV drivers freedom and convenience on the open road.

"Oregon has firmly established itself as a leader in the clean transportation movement," said Wahid Nawabi, AeroVironment senior vice president and general manager of its Efficient Energy Systems business segment. "Together, AeroVironment, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Oregon Department of Energy are delivering on the promise of transportation that promotes energy independence and frees drivers from fluctuating gas prices."

About Oregon Department of Energy

The Oregon Department of Energy provides tax credits, loans, technical assistance and energy information for homes, businesses, manufacturing, farms, ranches, schools and governments.

About Oregon Department of Transportation

The Oregon Department of Transportation values safety, customer service, efficiency, accountability, problem-solving, diversity and sustainability. Learn more at www.oregon.gov/ODOT.

About AeroVironment, Inc.

AeroVironment is a technology solutions provider that designs, develops, produces, operates and supports an advanced portfolio of electric transportation solutions and electric-powered Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). AeroVironment's comprehensive EV charging solutions include EV home charging, public charging, fast charging, data collection, grid-integrated communications and complete installation, training and support services for consumers, automakers, utilities, government agencies and businesses. AeroVironment's industrial electric vehicle charging systems support thousands of electric materials handling vehicles in mission-critical supply chains for Fortune 500 enterprises. AeroVironment's power cycling and test systems provide EV developers and EV battery manufacturers with market-leading simulation and cycling capabilities. Agencies of the U.S. Department of Defense and allied military services use the company's electric-powered, hand-launched unmanned aircraft systems to provide situational awareness to tactical operating units through real-time, airborne reconnaissance, surveillance and communication. More information is available at www.avinc.com and www.evsolutions.com.

Safe Harbor Statement

Certain statements in this press release may constitute "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are made on the basis of current expectations, forecasts and assumptions that involve risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, economic, competitive, governmental and technological factors outside of our control, that may cause our business, strategy or actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to; the activities of competitors; failure of the markets in which we operate to grow; failure to expand into new markets; failure to develop new products or integrate new technology with current products; and general economic and business conditions in the United States and elsewhere in the world. For a further list and description of such risks and uncertainties, see the reports we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We do not intend, and undertake no obligation, to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 51 Comments
      • 2 Years Ago
      Every 25 miles and with only 2 chargers per station, one of which is deathly slow unless you only need an extra 10 miles of urban cruising range to get home with? Better hope there aren't more than 55 other EV drivers wanting to travel that way on the same day as you, and that you're all evenly spaced then, I suppose? Otherwise you'll either be queueing, or getting increasingly panicky as you stop off at every single service area hoping to find one free but not doing so... and still topping off completely even if you find one free after only 25 miles of a 80+ mile range... (56 total drivers figure assumes that there's a station right at each end of the route as well) Good start however. Just needs several more fast DC stations put in at each stop to avoid the above problem. Gas stations can often get short queues with each user only stopping in place for five minutes, not 20-30... Which suggests to avoid undue holdups you need to keep close tabs on usage numbers, have spare plots marked out, additional capacity at the breaker board, and additional charge posts ready to be installed overnight. If all ICEs were replaced by electrics and everyone was driving the same way, you'd need at least 6x as many charging spots as there were gas pumps, possibly 7 or 8x so no-one has to wait more than a couple minutes for a spot. Even more when you consider that lower total range means more frequent fill ups. Even my shortest-ranged vehicle (a bike with a 3 USgal tank) can stretch to 250 miles if I'm careful... let's call it 3x what a leaf can manage. So 20-ish times as many charge spots as gas pumps. If you've got 8 pumps, well... might as well just put a charger at almost every parking spot and limit the ICE cars to parking at the remaining charger-less ones unless there's no alternative. However, every 1000 mile journey starts with a single step and all that.
      Ron Wagner
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wonderful news. I only hope that they do the same thing for CNG natural gas, as quickly as possible. Right now you can get from San Diego to Sacramento, or San Francisco if you take Highway 99, but you run into trouble on I 5. The gaps continue all the way to Portland.
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nice to see more chargers going up. Every one of these is a little victory in the road to getting off oil. Nice job to the states of Oregon & Washington.
      russellbgeister
      • 2 Years Ago
      I would say this would be a four stop trip in a top of the line tesla model s if your not to much of a lead foot mind you if your really good three
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @russellbgeister
        If you're really good, 0. The top end model has up to a 300 mile range. You could drive it both directions with only 1 charge.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          The article is about Oregon's portion, not all of I-5. The rest is still unelectrified.
          Sasparilla Fizz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          I think russellbgeister is talking about Tesla's you can actually own at this point - which is the Roadster. Model S deliveries will start in the summer and as you pointed out you could go both ways with one charge in the higher end version - a true no compromise EV. Can't wait to see them getting delivered.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          rotation, it's canada to mexico. it's 2000+km that would be a neat trick in a model S
      Christina
      • 2 Years Ago
      Awesome news! It's pretty exciting to get to witness this shift that will be the common use of the future. As long-range batteries like Envia's are put into use and further innovations made in battery technology that reduces cost for consumers, more people are going to be needing these charging stations! Fun to see the foundation being set!
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Christina
        Nothing to Envia but bull. They are trying to sell some tech to corps that they have no intentions of ever producing. They say once they sell it to a corp it should only take three years to get on the open market. Yea right! Truth is they don't have a clue of how long production of their battery will take to get to market if ever once they sell the battery tech. They have no intention of doing it themseleves but instead are trying to liscens it to others to do the work of production. It must not be that good if they won't lift a finger to bring Envia batteries to market themselves.
          brotherkenny4
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          The important thing would be to get it to market fast (if in fact their tech is real), and the best way to do that is to partner with someone who already has manufacturing. There are a number of options now in that regard. Really the question with Envia's tech is whether they have solved the issues with the manganese rich cathodes.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          I have issues with the way it was announced. They made it sound like they could have the batteries here in three years. When in fact they are doing nothing but selling a idea. So call it what it is. A idea for batteries that they think will work out but are not producing and it will be a cold day in hell if they could sell it and bring it to market in three years. To much hype for not much hope. Another battery that could be made if some one wanted to. Some how no one wants to, so far. There are many battery chemistry's in just this position but without the hype. People believe these batteries will be here soon, they will not.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          I'm not sure what you have against that business model. Lots of our small high tech companies in the UK such as the silicon designer ARM use it. They know that their expertise does not lie in manufacture, and so don't try it. They also have no wish to compete with their licensees by producing their own models. They stick to the research and design, which is where they add value and run very profitable businesses doing so.
      marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      Finally a sufficient number of EV production cars in everyday use exist, to commence a study into real world performance by locale. Charging needs, like usage, differ from EV driver to EV driver. Terrain and load can have a drastic effect on EV range and performance. These factors are not restricted to EV's. The same equation applies to energy depletion in ICE vehicles, but ICE has the advantage of quick and accessible energy replenishment. Recently, I drove from Buckinghamshire to Tumbrige Wells in the UK. A distance of about 58 miles, towing a double horse float, carrying 1000 lb of extra luggage, and 5 passengers. The round trip covered about 140 miles with a portion over rough terrain. Despite the extra load, the LEVRR only depleted 80% of its battery capacity. On the other hand the difference in the range of our identical EV's operating in the cities of Sydney, Australia and Melbourne Australia, is nearly 28%. The main difference that contributes to the poor performance of Sydney EV travel, seems to be created by three main factors. 1) Sydney's terrain of hills and gradients .2) Sydney's less favourable traffic conditions 3) Sydney's higher temperature and more passengers. Interestingly, the comparison to gasoline usage variation is very similar. Such localised factors should be taken into consideration when planning charging infrastructure.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @marcopolo
        Information on variation by temperature, and also factors like battery ageing, although not terrain or load for the Nissan Leaf is available here: http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=4295 It should be fairly trivial to fadge up something for other electric cars based on this.
          marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @DaveMart "It should be fairly trivial to fadge up something for other electric cars based on this". I'm not sure what you mean by that ! But, terrain and load are very important factors EV's in detirming real world performance..
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @marco: I meant just altering the table by looking at the car you have, and comparing its range under EPA or whatever standard, and altering the figures in the spread sheet by that adjustment. So for instance if you have an i-MiEV, then the EPA range of that is 62 miles as against 73 for the Leaf, so you would adjust the figures by multiplying them by 0.85. That won't be precise, but would be a handy rough guide. Of course none of this takes into account terrain, but adjusting for that is non-trivial, and the car companies are likely to need to compile a large database of runs over different terrain, and feed that in to a pretty sophisticated program to work out likely mileage over particular routes at different speeds and temperatures etc. That is a non-trivial task, and ain't gonna happen for a while, but I would expect you car in a few years when you plug in your route to give you a calculation including range for that topography and with the expected temperatures and so on. The tables I listed do though give some guidance on terrain effects on range calculations, suggesting that you should subtract 1.5kwh of power available for every 300 metres of height gained, and add 0.75-1kwh for every 300 metres downhill.
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      8 chargers 25 miles apart. That's only 225 miles of road. And if you want to travel it in a LEAF, you'd have to charge 3 times, that'd be about 2 hours of charging and 4 hours of driving, for an average speed of 37.5mph.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        It'd be silly to take a Leaf.. a Tesla car or prius would be better.. unless your time isn't money :)
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        The point is more that everyone in the area can do runs which will mostly be shorter, but without fear of running out. So you can drive maybe 60 miles in your Leaf, recharge whilst taking a break, then go another 50 miles, say. You might not want to go the full 225 miles, but 100 miles plus would be within easy range, so greatly increasing the utility of your vehicle by enabling occasional longer trips than the one-charge range of your vehicle. And everyone in Western Oregon and Washington will be able to do that.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          I used 60 miles rather than 80 for several reasons. For a start you would be travelling at highway speeds, sometimes in winter, which will restrict your range. As importantly its unlikely that the 25 mile intervals between charge stations will work out perfectly for you, and you don't want to be driving on the ragged edge. So I don't think most will be using these stations to take long road trips of several hundred miles. Instead they will increase the security and ease of comparatively modest journeys, so that you can think: Hey, I'm not running really low, but I might as well get a top-up anyway.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          DaveMart: There are a lot of electric cars around me. The two chargers at work are always full, there are about 12 cars that I see there regularly (including a Karma!). They even have a morning and an evening crew, 4 cars a day and it's not nearly enough. And anyway, no matter how few cars there are, you still cannot PLAN to be somewhere if you need to use a charger in the middle and there is only one charger. And if you don't get the charger, the wait could easily be 45 minutes. It could be longer if you aren't even 2nd in line. See, according to reports, DC fast chargers that are supposed to charge in 30 minutes really take over 40. They don't reach high enough voltages/currents to charge a LEAF to 80% in 30 minutes. The point is, that right now it's just really hard to plan to take a trip in an EV that includes travelling further than your vehicle's range in a day is iffy. Even if just want to take a LEAF from San Jose to San Francisco and back, you have to COUNT ON being able to charge in SF. What if you get there and the charger is busy? What if it is broken? What if an ICE vehicle has stolen the spot? There has to be more than one charger or at least the ability to reserve one. Until then, while it's possible to plan long trips in an EV, it's really closer to touring than trying to take a trip, because you cannot count on making a schedule. You say that it's reasonable to think that there will be more chargers before there are more EVs. I don't think that's reasonable most of all because I know it to be not true, not around here. And also because who is going to put in chargers before there is demand?
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @Rotation: Fair enough. I bow to your personal experience, which beats theory every time in my book. Nissan seems to be looking for a fast rollout of chargers though, which I am in two minds about as their supposed colleagues at Renault have come out with a clearly superior AC charging system, which puts all of the complex gubbins in the car and so the cost of a fast charger will be about $3,000, a fraction of the cost of a Nissan one. Between that and induction charging it seems clear to me that we may have to, at least in Europe, resign ourselves to the idea that some of the rollout may be obsolete before it is built. Nissan/Mitsubishi likely has a better chance in the US of making the Chademo standard dominant. Its a shame that is is not nearly as good as the Renault one.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          EV: That is one of the advantages of induction charging. Vandal proof, and can be under the road. It seems perhaps to be limited to around 6.6kw though, but the technology is at early stage.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          That's getting pretty theoretical. There aren't many electric cars on the road at the moment, just as there aren't many fast chargers. So you might be delayed by half an hour, things like that happen, although of course the average delay even if someone else is on the fast charger would be around 15 minutes. It seems reasonable to think that by the time there are enough electric cars on the roads so that this is a real as opposed to a theoretical problem there will be more chargers.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @Rotation: Assuming that I have understood the issue properly, which is by no means a given since I am not an engineer, the situation will be rather different in Europe with the Renault system. For a start under the NEDC cycle at least the Zoe will have around 20% more range than the Leaf. As pmpjunkie informed me when we were discussing the system: 'This makes perfect sense for Germany. The Renault Zoe already uses a system similar to the reductive charger from AC Propulsion (that uses the already existing power controller components in the car as charger components). This enables them to skip the roll-out of an expensive CHADEMO charger network and to just use the existing electrical infrastructure with a communication interface that handles access and billing. Considering that each German housing unit has at least 3phase service of 230V/63Amp, giving them a minimum of 43.5kW, you can do fast charging there in every house. And the CEE plug that can handle the load is only about $50-60 and already in mass production. http://green.autoblog.com/2012/03/15/daimler-bmw-others-form-hubject-jv-for-customer-friendly-elec/ The charger costs around $3,000, but I believe, perhaps erroneously, that most of that is for the connection and for the wiring up of that, so pmp seems to be saying that in many areas of Europe all that is needed is a socket. Many roads in Europe are also not as fast as in the US, so you would get a fair distance on the much less energetic intensity of 50-ish miles per hour. Stopping for a charge up need not be a total charge either, but at 43kw twenty minutes would add a lot of range. Lucky people in Germany and in some properties in France where they have 3-phase could also install a socket at home, and charge at the rate of 22kw or 43kw
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          You could in fact go 80 miles in your LEAF, recharge whilst taking a break and then go another 60 miles, say. Of course, you have to hope no one else has the same idea, because there's only one fast charger per location. With no way to reserve a charger, taking a trip using this system means you must give up the idea of having a timetable. It'd be like taking a tour, not going somewhere with a purpose.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @DaveMart: Just adding a bit of range (20%) doesn't really fix the problem. The problem is the ratio of time spent charging to time spent driving. Adding more range just lets you go a little further before recharging, which is always welcome. But it won't fix long trips where you have to charge. You really need to get it to (say) 10 minutes of charging per 100 minutes driving. Or ideally even better. It doesn't really matter if housing units have 43kW of power in Germany. The grid isn't designed to deliver 43kW to a lot of houses at once. If multiple houses in an area try to draw full power at once, you'll just blow up the transformers near your house. You have to upsize the chargers or go to a smart grid. And if you go to a smart grid, then your charge times go back up because you have to wait your turn before drawing full power or charge at a lower rate until it's your turn. This is all why there are demand charges for power, if everyone wants to draw 43kW at once, then the grid needs to be beefed up in your area and someone has to pay for that somehow. I'm interested in this idea of using the onboard circuitry to charge fast. But I am also skeptical. The problem is efficiency. Yes, the circuitry in a Tesla can transform 200kW of power. But it can't do it for long due to heat problems. If you run the car at full bore for a few minutes, it slows down to prevent overheating. This becomes a big problem when you want to charge the car, as you want to charge continuously for a long period of time. This is why DC charging was created in the first place, put the rectification and most of the regulation in the charger. The charger is stationary and can have significant cooling systems to cool itself. If you put these in the car, you make the car heavier, larger and less efficient. As to the stolen charge cord. This is going to be a huge issue. Copper is just too valuable right now. And the cables required to carry fast charging are substantial. They will be stolen. I can think of a couple of fixes for this, inductive charging is one of them. Another would be to put the plug on the charger and the charge cable on the car. Then the cable isn't there when a car isn't there. You don't have to worry about coming up to a charger that has no cable due to vandalism, since you are bringing it with you. I think really the best idea would be to roboticize the charger, having a mechanical arm that plugs into your car for you. It wouldn't extend until you put an ID/billing card in. And there's just no reason in this day and age I should have to get out of my car to plug in a cable to charge it. With only some minor standardization, the charger could find your charge socket automatically.
          Rotation
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          I think the obsolecence factor you refer to is the biggest impediment. Chargers are seen as rapidly going obsolete. Either outright replaced or merely dropping in price so much that 3/4ths of the money spent on the charger was an unnecessary expenditure. This is a huge incentive to not install chargers today, to just wait until tomorrow, or later. Wait until there is no other option. The other big impediment to projects like this is that, frankly, EV drivers are getting by without such charging stations pretty well. Most people really do drive less than 80 miles per day 98% of the time. They don't need to charge anywhere but at home. And since you know your home charging spot is always reserved for you, this works out great. You just have to take a different car on long trips. Between fast charging just not being fast enough (a LEAF takes 60 minutes to run down from 80% and 40 minutes to charge up to 80%, other cars are similar), using an EV for purposeful (not touring) long trips just isn't there yet. We'll either need even faster charging before that comes to be. And then you have to work out the demand charge issues which can make fast charging an EV in the daytime more expensive than gassing up a car (per mile). These things just won't be fixed soon. Around here it isn't stopping EV adoption though. I hope that's true in the rest of the country too.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Rotation: 20% extra may not be transformational, but it sure helps. I tried to explain that for many journeys in Europe you may be as likely to average 50mph if you are lucky rather than 70, obviously with the exception of express routes, and so you are likely to get nearer two hours of driving before needing a recharge as one. Transformers and load: the fast charge of 43 kw is unlikely in practise ever to be used at home, and Renault specifically recommend sticking to the 22kw when possible as it is less wearing on the battery. Transformers will need beefing up, and possibly some buffering, but the load should not be excessive most of the time from the home. Even if most of us had fast charging, 99% of the time I would leave it to come on at cheap rate overnight, probably just to top up an average run of maybe 30 miles, so would only draw about 6kwh overnight. Where having faster charging available might occasionally be handy is if someone returned from work, but were worried that their kids were poorly and might need taking to the docs or something, so could stick it on at 22kw for an hour and would be fully topped up. As for the efficiency of on-board charging, I can't tell whether what Renault have done works until the cars are in general use, but it seems unlikely to me that they have messed up the engineering when they have been running prototypes for years, so I will take them on faith until proved wrong. On the last point even a roboticised connection would not solve the problem that determined vandals could cut the cord whilst the car was charging. The only vandal proof system would seem to be inductive. I am pretty keen on that anyway, as in my view in many of the narrow streets and pavements in UK and European cites posts are both unsightly and impractical.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          What seems to be a big issue here in Oregon, the Leaf drivers have problems when they pull in almost empty and the fast chargers don't work, Blink is on the blink a lot. Vandals cut the head off one charger so it does not work. It is not like a gas station where people are on the premises and observing customers using their facilities. What is springing up here is plug share so to speak. I will soon be putting a outlet on my garage for people to charge for free. Maps are beginning to appear where people such as I list there address as a place to charge. Yea I know there may be some weirdos but I have a 357 Magnum revolver.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      The need to electrify the paths between LA, San Francisco, San Diego, Sacremento, Reno, and Las Vegas. If they did that, California & Nevada would be mostly covered for electric cars.
        Rotation
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        And San Jose, the 10th biggest city in the US. Covering CA99 would be a good idea too (Fresno).
      electronx16
      • 2 Years Ago
      So the level 2 charger would be for EVs without the option of fast charging like Focus EV and Coda. So their roadtrip would consist of cycles of 1 hour of (slow) driving/3 hours of charging. Or take a bicycle and arrive sooner? The point being of course that level 2 chargers and highways are probably not an ideal combination.
        JakeY
        • 2 Years Ago
        @electronx16
        "The point being of course that level 2 chargers and highways are probably not an ideal combination." Not really, if you had a 20kW level 2 charger (like on a Tesla), the charging would take only a little more than an hour for something like the Focus EV and Coda. The problem is so far non-Tesla EVs have on-board chargers with 6.6kW max and most level-2 chargers are not 20kW capable. Anyways, EVs with ~100 miles of range are not suitable for very long road trips in the first place, if you are in a hurry, even with the current fast chargers. Although if you have the time, you can at least make the trip now, with the chargers installed.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          Take it from a guy who has done it. 260 miles with 9 hours road charging time with a 3.3 kw charger. 10 kw DIY charger is 950 dollars if you put it together your self. 2k dollars if they send it already assembled. For business this will not work yet. If on vacation or weekend I love taking my EV on road trips it is a bit of a adventure especially before we had any charging stations here in Oregon. RV parks work just fine but they all want 10 or 15 dollars to connect. When they do start charging for the electricity at these charging stations it will be interesting to see people scrounging for faster chargers if they get charged a hourly rate such as 3 dollars per hour for level 2 charging. With a 3.3 kw charger I can pull 50 cents worth of electricity in one hour. I will be over paying in that circumstance. A 10kw charger would make the proposition much more equatable for me.
        marcopolo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @electronx16
        @electronx16 You are correct. Most EV's are unsuitable for long distance highway travel. Outside of emergency charging such networks seem logistically impractical. Fast charging for long range EV's equipped with fast charging capacity would be better located at road houses or nearby towns. the scenario of 3-4 hour driving for under 1 hour charging, isn't too bad. Extending a nearly 600 mile trip by an one extra hour for a meal/ sightseeing/ nap break is feasible. My problem with the current charging network infrastructure roll out , is that it will quickly prove obsolete and impractical, making any capital investment to expand or update, very difficult to obtain.
      george costanza
      • 2 Years Ago
      while rednecks b!tch about california all denialist 'red'neck states year after year after year suck up all welfare dollars for crotch droppings and NOTHING to show but more ignorant denialists.... this country needs to either show some 'tough love' or force them to secede. denialist red states are like an anchor over ANY progress in the US. next will be six dollar gas from right wing radical wet dream i.e. war with Iran. if GOP get anywhere near power to start WW III, they have already openly stated this is their 'vision' for our near future. California will be prepared but nowhere else......and somehow it will be 'liberals' fault.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @george costanza
        you're crazy... but i like you :D
        Actionable Mango
        • 2 Years Ago
        @george costanza
        If war with Iran is a right wing radical wet dream, then Obama must be a secret GOP plant. He's already stated he will use military force to prevent Iran from getting nuclear weapons. In fact, Obama is doing things that would have expected from a third Bush term. (No doubt this will piss off both Democrats AND Republicans, so I am prepared to be down-ranked despite the truth in my statements.) Guantanamo is still open. Extraordinary rendition still occurs. "Enhanced" interrogation still occurs (minus waterboarding). Obama exited Iraq on the exact day specified by Bush. In fact, Obama lobbied Iraq to allow us to stay longer. He has dramatically increased the direct murder of innocent civilians all over the Middle East via drone attacks. He violated the war powers act by using military force in Libya far longer than 60 days without Congressional approval. He has repeatedly signed extensions to the Patriot Act. He has authorized American citizens to be held and killed without due process, both abroad and at home. He says these things are legally justified, but the legal rational is secret. I can go on and on. These are things that I am largely against, and I don't understand where all the Liberal outrage went. Like it's bad when Bush does it's but okay when Obama does it?
      george costanza
      • 2 Years Ago
      the climate is hotter and hotter so isn't it about time to just have solar chargers EVERYWHERE??? it is free and clean and there is enough solar energy to power the Earth's current energy needs i.e. HUMAN energy needs about half incoming solar energy even reaches Earth or we would all be krispy already but around a hundredth of a millionth of a percent of this energy which reaches surface would more than cover ALL human needs. not even taking into account future energy conservation etc. due to humans needing clean air and clean water etc.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @george costanza
        sure. wind and solar can power everything. if only we rationalized our activities
        • 2 Years Ago
        @george costanza
        its a good idea, especially as this rather limited initial deployment could be easily covered by a bank of solar cells and some kind of accumulator (for overnight charges) at the service station itself. However I think you're confused about how they, and global warming, work. The increased heat is less than 1'F so far, it isnt because we have more sunlight, and it doesnt confer any benefit to cells which work almost exclusively with visible light. In fact, I think warm solar cells are less efficient than cold ones? It's something that needs to be implemented, but you will have to promote it for other reasons than that if you want to get people to listen seriously.
      george costanza
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think this country is no longer one contiguous entity. I am in a blue state but for me that just means fu*(ing outrageous taxes for property school etc with no accountability and sh*(ty services and no plug in chargers and surrounded by backwards denialist rednecks in hemis and of course mao mart. downtowns everywhere in this region look dilapidated and blighted because denialist rednecks dont support them. if one of these sh*(t bags even saw a charger they would probably go apesh*(t in the local paper.... I get all the bad parts of so called liberal theory incl. handing out welfare money to waste o' flesh breeders like skittles but ZERO progressive iniatives. such as elec cars...it is a sh*(ty deal....all west coast should be one progressive country where nobody has to drive for commuting anyway and has all new elec cars and choices. midwest turning to desert should be split off asap or they are going to be a HUGE money pit from climate change which they don't even fuIUing acknowledge while they turn to desert on top of building a huge fu*(ing pipe right over our country's main aquifer. greed greed greed drill drill drill deny deny deny me me me should be this country' motto or 'everything is somebody's else's problem, not mine. I will deny anything unless some sh*(t for brains on faux news tells truth and even then will still deny it. case in point: faux news even stated last year over ten mill environmental refugees from mexico should be expected within next few years not for jobs but just to SURVIVE fossil fuel pollution damages. like dubya said as there are too many rocks for brains in US and no solutions to something we dont even agree is happening while bankrupting us and ensuring there will never be any recovery due to obstructionism and denialism "this sucker's goin' down'.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @george costanza
        what most of the people in your satanic country isn't aware of is that you waste most of your money on the military. it's probably worth realizing that killing millions of people based on lies is not that good of an investment. I'm just sayin.. it's certainly not a winning PR campaign.
    • Load More Comments