By all accounts, vehicle theft is down to some of the lowest levels in over 25 years. Even so, cars are still getting pilfered every day, and LoJack has gone through the trouble of crafting a detailed infographic displaying some of the more interesting information associated with the 10,251 LoJack-equipped vehicles that were stolen and then recovered last year. The company says that, of all vehicles equipped with the theft recovery system, 92 percent are brought back to their rightful owners. Last year, the most stolen and recovered 2011 model was the ubiquitous 2011 Toyota Camry, while the Honda Accord took the top slot overall.

The oldest model saved from the clutches of thieves in 2011 was a 1948 Chevrolet Fleetline, while the priciest of them all was a 2010 Mercedes-Benz S63 AMG worth $116,825. Not too shabby.

Not surprisingly, California led the list of states with the most stolen and recovered vehicles, with Texas, Florida, New York and New Jersey fleshing out the top five. The full, expanded infographic can be seen below.


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  • 24 Comments
      maxximtl
      • 3 Years Ago
      "Recovered" doesn't mean "in-tact." My non-LoJack equipped Integra was recovered. Of course, all the police found was a completely stripped shell that had been set on fire. I'd be more interesting in knowing what percentage were returned undamaged.
      joe shmoe
      • 3 Years Ago
      If i have a car under $50k, I don't want it back if it's stolen. I don't want to get it back with feces all over the interior, and the seats cut up. I'd rather pay the slightly higher insurance premium to not have lojack.
      tbirdfive0
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'd like to know how many of the 10,261 recoveries actually resulted in arrests and convictions?
      Murad
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nevada is far from the 10th most populous, so it's noteworthy that it made the list. Illinois is easily in the top 10, so it's noteworthy that it didn't.
        yesaninsider
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Murad
        About NV - that was the first thing I thought of as well...I lived in Vegas for 7+ yrs and the auto theft RATE is MUCH higher than almost anywhere else. A friend of mine had her Saturn stolen 4 times in 6 months, got so tired of paying for repairs by the last time she didn't even bother to replace the sunroof and just left the car to be taken... The fact NV is on this list is damn impressive given there's less than 2.5 mil people in the Vegas metro area...am glad I got outta that butthole a few years ago...
      Shiftright
      • 3 Years Ago
      The moral here is: Drive an interesting car and no one will steal it. Make it a stick and further lower your chances as apparently most car thieves can't drive stick
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shiftright
        [blocked]
      HollywoodF1
      • 3 Years Ago
      Better statistics without the marketing slant: Forbes 2010 list of most vehicle theft rates by city: City, State, Thefts per 100,000 population 1. Laredo, TX, 742 2. Modesto, CA, 727 3. Bakersfield, CA, 685 4. Stockton, CA, 664 5. Fresno, CA, 642 6. Yakima, WA, 638 7. San Francisco / Oakland / Freemont, CA, 611 8. Visalia / Porterville, CA, 568 9. Las Vegas / Paradise, NV, 563 10. Albuquerque, NM, 561
        yesaninsider
        • 3 Years Ago
        @HollywoodF1
        FYI - the reason why Las Vegas is lumped together w/Paradise (Henderson area) is to dilute the extremely high theft rate in metro Las Vegas...auto theft is an epidemic in Vegas, has been for years...ask a local, a long time resident, or even your insurance company! Yea Vegas, #1 at something still!
      dallifornia
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow, they recovered a Mercedes Benz S63 AM, a car so rare that they had to take a letter off.
      Zoom
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wish things like this took into account rates vs. sheer numbers. Of course the (largely) most populous states round out the top 10.
        benzaholic
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        And the top selling vehicles like Camrys and Accords are more likely to have larger raw numbers of them stolen, hence their presence on this list. ALWAYS question statistics. Almost by definition, they omit some details. Which details did they omit, and do you think those were the best choice for supporting whatever claims are made? The flip side of that is if you ever need to present some statistics/numbers. It's not too hard to make them support your position, whatever your position may be. Or at least 73.29% of the time according to at least one researcher (me, and I really didn't invest a lot of effort or resources or even facts in arriving at that number, but that kind of trickery is inelegant. stats can be made to support you without blatantly lying.)
        Spitifre
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        The man has a point. Same for the cars. Tons of Camry's and Accords on the road = better chance of it being stolen.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spitifre
          [blocked]
        Sheldon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Zoom
        That would be interesting to see. Another thing to consider though is that it's probably just alot more common in populous areas. If you're in smalltown nebraska, people know their neighbors cars. If you were to steal a car and take it even a couple towns over, I'd imagine it would be easier to find than a car in a big city. It's probably easier to hide a car within 10 miles of where it was stolen in LA than it is to hide it within 100 miles in Wyoming.
      Joe
      • 3 Years Ago
      is it any wonder why texas and arizona want a more secured boarder??
      Randy
      • 3 Years Ago
      This reminds me of 1993 when my Mustang was stolen out if a movie theater parking lot. I scoured the area for my car and when it was finally found I asked the police department if they wanted to take finger prints off anything before it got fixed and the officer at the window at the Revere, MA PD said "ha ha ha ha ha haaaaaa, what do you think this is a Hollywood movie?". A crushing moment to say the least. Thankfully, although to late, the PD in my home town said they would have dusted the car and if it happens again to let them know, regardless of where the car was stolen from or found. It gave me hope and undid what the other PD's officer said. Kudos to my towns PD!
      roadkill
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am with Joe Shmoe, when a car is stolen, it is driven beyond hard and damaged in ways that can't be seen. Even if it looks ok when they recover it or can be fixed cosmetically, I do not want it back, I will never buy lojack - if my car is stolen I hope it is chopped up destroyed or gone forever!
        Agilis
        • 3 Years Ago
        @roadkill
        Such an idiotic statement. Most cars, when stolen, are being stolen because the thief needs the vehicle, either for parts, or to actually use/own the vehicle. Or in another scenario with high prices cars, the car is being stolen and shipped over seas because it was 'ordered'. Thieves don't just steal the car because they want to take it for a joy ride, what do you think this is, the scene from Ferris Bueller?
      Mary
      • 2 Years Ago
      Lojak to me is a pricey scam. They fail to mention the $100.00 or so you have to pay each year after the first three years for them to check it to see if it's still working ok. I had a car stolen once (no Lojak) & they crashed it, tore the speakers out, & it was only recovered because someone was being chased by the cops, got into it, & it wouldn't start so they ditched it. If you have a cheap car not worth the effort for the supposed savings. It would be worth it for a luxury car or a classic car but not any car under $25,000.00.
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