QBEAK, the city electric vehicle that's been pitched by Denmark-based ECOmove over the past year and a half, received this year's 'European Electric Vehicles Early Stage Investment Opportunity Award' from UK-based Frost & Sullivan, which said that ECOmove is "very close" to starting sales of the car.

ECOmove is planning on offering QBEAK models with a single-charge range from 125 miles to about 190 miles, Frost & Sullivan said. The car, which weighs about 900 pounds and is made of rust-free materials, is about 10-feet long, or about a foot longer than a Smart ForTwo. The QBEAK's interior is also modular, offering as many as six removable seats. Frost & Sullivan didn't reveal pricing details or specify exactly when the model would launch, only saying that it would debut this year.

Last March, ECOmove released a promotional video for the commuter car that included information such as the fact that it has electric sliding doors and a floor cut-away to allow the driver easier seat access. ECOmove first unveiled a prototype of the EV in the fall of 2010. The company pitched an extra-light body made out of aluminum, Kevlar composites and plastics as well as recyclable body panels and a range of electric powertrains that could provide as many as 155 miles on a single charge.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      Warren
      • 2 Years Ago
      "Obviously better than a NEV, but not quite "freeway capable" There is nothing remotely free about freeways. The worst thing America has ever done. We wanted to be able to move tanks, etc, blitzkrieg -style, to beat the commies in a land war. We got the tanks (SUV), the commies got cars. We all lost. Moving people, individually, at 75 mph, in two ton boxes, is insane. Moving freight on freeways, rather than trains, is insane.
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Warren
        First person angry about freeways. Too bad gas mileage is always better on them than in the city (hybrids excepted). So warren, you would rather we use more gas, take much longer to drive long trips, slow down commerce? Yes yes, trains.... People get worked up about the oddest things.
          Warren
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          Heavy vehicles have poor efficiency in stop-and-go conditions. Yesterday I rode 80 miles, and used 10.1 Wh/ mi, at 21 mph average. Small, light, machines are fine. Light rail is the way to move people at speed. "People get worked up about the oddest things." Yes. Like the record setting temps in March. Fifty years from now, people will look back, in amazement, at how incredibly stupid we were.
      Grendal
      • 2 Years Ago
      What is its top speed? Unless they change the safety laws it won't be able to be sold in the US. It has the weirdest looking steering wheel in the prototype. It reminds me of those plastic trumpets people "blat" at ball games. Ultra light weight and modular are certainly good things to have in a vehicle. If it doesn't reach a speed above 40 MPH, slightly aerodynamic should be enough. Really interesting and innovative little car. How soon before you get one, Dan? Being modular, you can modify it aerodynamically to your hearts content. Or maybe just buy just the skateboard...
        Chris M
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Grendal
        "What is the top speed" was also my first question. If it is "NEV class" limited to 35 mph or less, then that range seems a bit excessive. If it is full freeway capable, 75 mph or more, then it sounds quite attractive and the range make sense. But what if the top speed is 55 mph? Obviously better than a NEV, but not quite "freeway capable, it might still sell fairly well.
      marcopolo
      • 2 Years Ago
      For once DF's caution is commendable. The QBEAK, reminds me of the original Mini. Problem is, when you load cars of this design with all the modern safety equipment and electronics, not only does the weight increase, but so too does the price. The vehicles ground clearance looks unsuitable for most cities, but that might be just the photo. Most of these concept designs remain stillborn when the economics are factored in. But the Mini was considered just as revolutionary in 1959.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @marcopolo
        try not to speak for me. I haven't cautioned about the safety of this car. nor offered any caution to my recollection. another positive to mention is the budget if they actually deliver this summer. I don't know the exact amount but it's my impression that it's only a couple of million euros. I wouldn't choose that layout/design/aerodynamics but it seems they are doing quite a few others things well. I wasn't a big fan of the vuvuzela steering wheel but should be interesting anyway : ) maybe they'll live long enough to make an aerodynamic model too. could be explosive
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          cautious optimism isn't the same as just caution
          marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          @DF "pretty fast launch. should be interesting" In veiw your normal abrupt dismissal of any new model, I took the above comment to be cautiously approving!
      throwback
      • 2 Years Ago
      Reminds me of Gordon Murray's istream car.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        did he really call it istream? : ) maybe he should call it pstream
          Peder Norby
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Dan, As we share some national lineage, I think, I'd like you to comment on the 900lbs. There is no way in Sweden that the 900lbs number can include the battery. But you gotta love the lightness and fun factor!
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          of course it can weigh 400kg including battery. that's what I have been saying. a piano with a cast iron frame weighs around 200kg. a couple of wheels, strengt to carry a few people and a body shell doesn't have to weigh much. nor does the battery. say you use a stack of 160Wh/kg cells. 62.5kg of that is 10kWh. 10kWh will move 400kg quite a distance. or say you make the pack 100kg heavier and make it from 230Wh/kg laptop cells. that's 37kWh. I think that will move a 500kg car quite a distance.
        skierpage
        • 2 Years Ago
        @throwback
        I thought so too, but not really. Gordon Murray's T.27 electric car is quite a bit taller, much narrower than its axle width, and an insane 2 feet shorter (2.5 m or 8.2 feet long!). The T.27 greenhouse tips forward for entry, while the QBEAK doesn't show any shutlines for the doors. iStream "replaces stamped steel with a composite monocoque bonded to a tubular steel frame and plastic bodywork", it need not involve "aluminum, Kevlar composites". http://www.gordonmurraydesign.com/press-T27-unveiled.php I wish someone would step forward and build the damn thing! Everyone wants their own sexy stupid computer rendering.
      Ziv
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Qbeak goes 0-90 kph in 12 seconds and has a top speed of 93 mph, (from two different sources), but I am guessing the car is built for speeds under 60 mph primarily. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currently_available_electric_cars
      Peter
      • 2 Years Ago
      The design is original, if not out and out brilliant, comprising many innovative components and approaches to minimize weight, maximize customization, most highly dependent on composites. This makes low volume production possible, and yes it will scale, but it cannot scale price competitively against more traditional (sic!) approaches like the Leaf, particularly with battery price projected to fall.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Years Ago
      pretty fast launch. should be interesting
      LUKAFOTO
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ally body is no problem - my 11 year old 165,000mile Audi A2 is still managing 78 to 103 MPG (UK Gals) and it didn't cost 40k USD! An even more efficient use of EV power is here: http://www.pc-aero.de/
      LEONARD
      • 2 Years Ago
      Make it from abs plastic and cut the cost to under 17k
        Peter
        • 2 Years Ago
        @LEONARD
        Been there that hasn't been done. The Think, ABS plastic and much much cheaper design, couldn't be produced for 17,000 USD not even £17,000.
          LEONARD
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Peter
          The mfg failed to Think on the Think, my Crx and Saturns did not cost 17k
      Ziv
      • 2 Years Ago
      900 pounds and 125 mile range? Seats 4 people or 6 munchkins? Kind of cute look? This car will sell crazy well if it is priced under $33,000 MSRP. Otherwise the Leaf eats its lunch. But based on the aluminum and the lack of volume, will it have an MSRP closer to $40,000? That would be my guess. A basic city car that costs $40k before credit will be a hard sell. I can dream though. If this car sold with the battery and the MSRP was around $27k and you got the $7.5k credit for a net price of around $20k? That would be cool! Even if the interior was hashed together, lightweight dross, it would be an electric car that was inexpensive and had real world range!
    • Load More Comments