Former GM vice chairman Bob Lutz helped create the Chev... Former GM vice chairman Bob Lutz helped create the Chevy Volt. (Courtesy GM).
The continued uninformed, childish and unfounded attacks on the Chevrolet Volt have finally riled up staunch conservative and retired automotive guru Bob Lutz, who took a bite out of Bill O'Reilly and the gang of neo-cons dead-set on bashing this range-extended hybrid into oblivion.

In a blog post on Forbes.com, Lutz tried to quell the rumors, innuendo and outright lies of the "rabid, sadly misinformed right" who began piling on this Chevy soon after General Motors Co. announced it would suspend production for five weeks.

Unlike any other car before, the Volt has drawn the ire of many anti-Obama forces. In their minds, the Volt is a symbol GM's post-bailout success. That, of course, means it must be dismantled and proclaimed an absolute failure.

Last November, the right-wingers thought they had their final piece of evidence when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration disclosed that after crash-testing a Volt, its battery pack caught fire. Let the diatribes begin. From Glen Beck to Fox Business News's Stuart Varney to radio jock Rush Limbaugh, anyone with an axe to grind and a talk show began proclaiming the Volt an abject failure. Even after the Volt was cleared by NHTSA of any problems in January, talk show haters continued to say the Volt would burst into flames faster than a drummer in Spinal Tap.

Facebookers sympathetic to the modern-day conservative bash of the auto bailout were posting Volt is a "fireball" regardless of the truth or investigative findings.

Lutz, a self-described conservative and doubter of global warming, had enough of Fox and friends overlooking facts and misrepresenting truth, while continuing to take money from GM for commercials running on their shows.

And Lutz is right. The Volt is perfectly safe. Not one Volt has ever caught fire on an American road, none, zero, nada.

Furthermore, Lutz points out that President Obama had nothing to do with the car's development. Lutz, who came up with the idea of an extended range hybrid, began overseeing the car's development in 2006, when Senator Obama was still unpacking in Washington D.C..

An example of how wrong detractors have been is even if the exact same circumstances unfolded in the first NHTSA test on a real road in America and the people inside the Volt stayed buckled up until the fire started, they would die of starvation long before any the first whiff of smoke. The first fire took three weeks to start, and that was only because NHTSA did not drain the energy in the batteries after the accident.

Sadly, the Volt has become a political football punted around by so many right wingers that the truth about this car has gone unnoticed.

It's an engineering marvel, providing emission-free transportation for 40 miles and then unlimited transportation after that. It can do the one thing no other electric car on the road today can do: Keep going after the battery pack is empty.

Give credit where credit is due: Not the president, not any political party, but rather the engineers, designers and GM executives like Lutz for coming up with something no one ever put on the road.

And for the record, every Volt is born in Hamtramck, Michigan, making it a U.S. citizen at birth. Birth certificates, of course, can be denied.


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  • 17 Comments
      Richard Goebel
      • 2 Years Ago
      What do you expect from Faux news sheep? These people should try to get beyond the fourth grade.
      dngrwill
      • 2 Years Ago
      Really? Was the 'returns fire' an unintended pun since so many Volt's have gone up in smoke? Was it maybe since there was the government bailout that turned GM into Government Motors and had Obama specifically pushing the Volt to the public - despite a lack of demand? Or maybe it's because the Volt has been one of the biggest flops in car history? Or how about the ginormous government rebate check as an attempt to get asses in the seats of the Volt? The complaint? Government doesn't belong in private business. This decision is one of the reasons why the tax payers lost BILLIONS in our government bailout to GM.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dngrwill
        Really? Name one person who's Chevy volt went up in smoke. Oh wait, you can't because you don't have facts. You just repeat BS right wing propaganda like a drone.
          dngrwill
          • 2 Years Ago
          Just to keep up the sourcing - Chevy sold approximately 6800 volts in 2011 - a HUGE flop in sales. Especially when you consider they spent over $750 MILLION to develop it. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-12-01/chevrolet-volt-sales-rise-2-8-as-u-s-probes-gm-plug-in-hybrid.html http://green.autoblog.com/2008/12/09/chevy-volt-will-cost-gm-750-milllion/
          dngrwill
          • 2 Years Ago
          It was Chevy's own Volt used for testing that prompted a Government Investigation. Get your head on straight before you post dick. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/26/chevy-volt-battery-fire-electric-car-general-motors_n_1114193.html
          hgeorgech
          • 2 Years Ago
          uh ... attention: Chevy offered to buy back VOLTS from persons fearful of the fire issue .. does that tell you anything? there's no left wing, right wing involved here .. period
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ dngrwill Yea, that was a company vehicle not one purchased by a consumer as kubush was getting at. Besides, any consumer that sits in the volt after it crashes for weeks will be in more trouble then the fire will cause once it starts. As far as the sales flop, take a look back at the history of the Prius. Toyota admitted to losing money on the vehicle and there were lackluster sales. Now Toyota basically owns the hybrid market. Stop being so short-sited
      • 2 Years Ago
      EVERY VOLT SOLD COSTS THE TAXPAYERS 10 GRAND (REBATES), AND COSTS THE BUYER 40 PLUS GRAND TO PURCHASE! WHAT'S THE ELECTRICAL COST TO CHARGE ONE OF THESE A COUUPLE TIMES A DAY? HOW IS THAT ELECTRICITY GENERATED?
        hgeorgech
        • 2 Years Ago
        And .... what is the cost to replace those batteries down the road? per a local Chevy dealer .. about $3000 + labor Thus, any long-term cost "break-even" for a VOLT seems mythical The current VOLT's greatest shortcomings tho are woefully inadequate range (in electric mode) and the fact that there are virtually no recharge stations + the reality that a full recharge takes 8 - 10 hrs. Once the VOLT is operating in its gasoline powered mode, it's not appreciably different (mpg-wise) than the FAR less costly Cruze Maybe by the time Prez Obama buys his 2018 VOLT (he promised, right?) these ills will be no more .. but don't bet on it!
      • 2 Years Ago
      The only reason Chevy made the Volt was so they could get people into the showroom. Once the interested customer sees the sticker they leave, or at leats try to, but not before the salesman talks them into a just as economical, Cruz.
      Voltron
      • 2 Years Ago
      I love my Chevy Volt. Just leased it a few weeks ago, have driven it over 500 miles on less than 5 gallons of gas, averaging over 100 MPG, and still on my first tank of gas, priceless!!! Whatever these Yahoos are blabbering about and hating on the Volt, I really have no idea what they are talking about. If your interested in getting a Volt, Instead of listening to those bozos, or reading a confussing article on the interwebs, try out a Volt for yourself, or ask a Volt owner what they really think. My Volt is the most comfortable, nicest level of luxury, most high tech vehicle I've owned, just a joy to drive. Really, and that's the truth.
      hgeorgech
      • 2 Years Ago
      A message for Bob Lutz: Bob, look back 100 years at early electric cars that came to market in the USA .. yes, 100 years ago. They failed. Why? . Lack of adequate driving range . Virtually no recharging stations . Reliability . High maintenence costs . They cost too much . Impractical for a (1) vehicle family OK, look at the Volt - a partial electric vehicle .. it has the SAME shortcomings, Bob, what else is new? . . The Volt - in order to be practical - needs a driving range (minimum) of 150-200 miles - in electric mode . . Charging stations needed at office buildings, airports, shopping malls, apartment and condo complexes . . Recharges (complete) need to be done in
        Josh
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        Mass-market acceptance really isn't the point of this car. Frankly, it's not really the point of any of the current crop of electric car makers - yet. The goal of the Volt is to literally, learn how to build an electric that the company hopes will eventually reach that beautiful point of mass-market acceptance - with all the lower level kinks, dealership support and repair, consumer feedback, etc worked out. The goal is for GM to be the leader in that field by the time that happens (and it will - only a matter of when not if). It's not practical. it's a novelty at this point - just like spending $45k on a silly Mustang GT or Challenger SRT-8. All depends on the person. But the only way to learn the best battery chemistry for a high-pull motor like an electric vehicle motor, all while maintaining daily drivability and reliability and growing company infrastructure while hopefully coinciding with public infrastructure growth as well ... the only way to be the first American company to build one here and sell it. GM's gonna bumble a lot of their new products but the Volt is just too good of a concept to fail - even with GM's notoriously lousy execution.
          Josh
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Josh
          O, and as a car guy - I would hope you 'look-away' at how certain things really aren't what they say they are in the auto industry (Stang GT's with 26 MPG? Yeah on the moon, maybe) and the Volt is literally just one of those things. I think we can all agree we should probably wean ourselves off of fossil fuel use, at least try to replace a majority of our daily trans with it. Electric vehicles will HAVE to be the answer at this point. And joke companies like Tesla and Fisker (you don't see the richie conserv pundits talking about that huh? - probably kicking themselves thinking funding vaporware instead of actual real factories and good workers is good PR) WILL NOT be able to push the electric envelope. It will have to be one of the big boys making mass market crap. And besides - what country are you f*cking from - do you really want Toyota being the leader?
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        Why does it need to have a 150 mi range on electric alone??? It has a range comparable to gas vehicles. How hard would it be to add electric chargers to current stations? Not that you need them with the volt since you can fill it up with gas. Prices will drop with time and the tech will get better. All of your concerns are trivial.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        The reason electric vehicles died was because gas was plentiful and cheap. The petrol supply is getting thinner and thinner as the world population increases and countries like China forge ahead with growth. Petrol will hit a peak. The world was a far cry from 7 Billion people in 1900. The Volt is designed for the average commuter (75% of the population) that commutes less than 40 miles. So theoretically the volt could run on nothing but electricity for a large percentage of the populous. Let me pose a question to you: when petrol does run out, or supply becomes so restricted that prices of gasoline double, triple or quadruple, what would you rather drive, petrol vehicle or an electric one? And when your range in the electric vehicle is up, wouldn't you like to have a backup plan rather then spending 4-8 hours waiting for your battery to charge at a station? And if none of these are the solution, then what technology would you like to see take the place of Petrol?
        Rick
        • 2 Years Ago
        @hgeorgech
        It is practical in that covers the daily commute for a large slice of drivers on the roads. Then, it can drive on endlessly without stopping for a recharge on a long road trip. It does not need to have greater electric range for that reason.
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