Obviously, we spend a lot of time trawling the Internet looking for interesting automotive news. When we find it, we're often curious to get a little more backstory. Sometimes we need some of the big players identified, due to our own lack of familiarity with what's going on in the larger world of pop culture that has nothing to do with cars. For that task, we occasionally rely on Wikipedia to help us dig up additional sources – probably just the same as you do.

Thus, we're glad to see a Daimler employee called out for an alleged misdeed, which is not just against Wikipedia's policies, but frankly, runs counter to the whole spirit of the not-for-profit, crowd-sourced Internet encyclopedia. According to a report by The Local, someone with a Daimler IP address altered the company's German-language Wikipedia page, seemingly intent on removing unflattering passages. The section in question concerned a "Worst EU Lobbying Award" that the parent of the Mercedes-Benz brand received in 2007, along with BMW and Porsche, for "a concerted campaign to 'dilute and delay CO2 reduction targets.'"

A Daimler spokesman is deflecting the incident by blaming it on employees, calling the actions "independent" and "private," insinuating that they were not part of an official directive from the company itself. Apparently changes to other Wikipedia pages were made at the same time, those concerning the cereal muesli and Victoria, the Crown Princess of Sweden, suggesting there could be something to spokesman's assertion.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 33 Comments
      guyverfanboy
      • 3 Years Ago
      No surprise there. Other companies have been caught doing the same thing. Hopefully Wikipedia locks their page so only moderators (or whoever) can edit it.
        TangoR34
        • 3 Years Ago
        @guyverfanboy
        So right. Electronic Arts did that before as well.
      over9000
      • 3 Years Ago
      [citation needed]
      brgtlm
      • 3 Years Ago
      Stupid employee must not have read previous examples of the same thing happening to other companies.
      sc0rch3d
      • 3 Years Ago
      typical corporate bullshit if the company does something naughty, it was an individual gone awry if the company does something great, it was a team effort
      Drakkon
      • 3 Years Ago
      Go onto Android Market. Lookup Norton Anti-Virus and convince me that most of the posts were not written by the marketing department at the company. They even follow the same format. One word title (Awesome!) followed by a very short sentence (Best app ever.) NO grammatical errors, no misspellings, no internet slang. The managers brought pizza to the office, but to get some, you had to post a review...
      David S.
      • 3 Years Ago
      What the hell is his problem with muesli?
        Keith C
        • 3 Years Ago
        @David S.
        It gets totally soggy in milk, and their parent company doesn't want the public to know.
      creamwobbly
      • 3 Years Ago
      "we occasionally rely on Wikipedia to help us dig up additional sources" Go on, admit it. You sometimes don't go to those sources, do you? :-)
      superchan7
      • 3 Years Ago
      This case (and countless others, I'm sure) can only serve as a motivator for Wikipedia to better police itself. Being a private collection of information, Wikipedia can never claim to be completely factual. Its contributors and viewing community are responsible for enforcing its policies and weeding out bias.
        superchan7
        • 3 Years Ago
        @superchan7
        I still like Wikipedia a lot. It tells me some basic facts that are probably not biased and that not everyone around me knows, for example that China is a country in Asia.
      throwback
      • 3 Years Ago
      What's the big deal? Isn't the point of wikipedia that anyone can edit info?
        creamwobbly
        • 3 Years Ago
        @throwback
        The big deal is that "vanity" editing; whether or not it's accurate information, is always untrustworthy.
          throwback
          • 3 Years Ago
          @creamwobbly
          as opposed to some of the non-vanity stuff that's put on wikipedia?
      David Garfunkel
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why not? The Obama White House does it.
      Pandabear
      • 3 Years Ago
      Typical German traits: never admit you have problems.
        Fermat1313
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Pandabear
        Typical ignorant person trait. Assign a specific set of behaviors to an entire group of people.
          Dark Gnat
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Fermat1313
          Typical humorless trait. Never get the joke.
      throwback
      • 3 Years Ago
      What's the big deal? Isn't the point of wikipedia that anyone can edit info?
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