Nissan will almost double the number of workers at its factory in Smyrna, TN, within the next year in part to ramp up production of both Nissan Leaf electric vehicles and battery packs, HybridCars reports.

Nissan will add 1,300 workers specifically for the battery packs and for the Leafs, which will start being built in the U.S. later this year. The Japanese automaker has invested $1.7 billion upgrading the plant, which will include a 1.3-million-square-foot facility dedicated to making battery packs. In all, Nissan will employ about 6,000 at the factory by early next year.

With the improvements, Nissan's plant in Smyrna, about 25 miles southeast of Nashville, will be able to produce as many as 200,000 Leafs and 150,000 battery packs a year. Last month, Nissan sold 478 Leafs in the U.S., marking a sevenfold increase from a year earlier though down from the 676 Leafs sold in January. In 2011, Nissan sold 9,674 Leafs, slightly less than the company's target of 10,000 units for its first full year of U.S. sales.


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  • 56 Comments
      Warren
      • 3 Years Ago
      "My guess is that Nissan will start a NV200 production line to build vans" Yes, DaveMart. In town delivery vans...less noise, less pollution, less volatile fuel costs, green image. A win-win.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Warren
        Nissan are also toying with making a more radical design of car, something only possible using the design freedoms given by the use of electric motors and so on, maybe in the wheels or close to them. It will be interesting to see what they come up with. I would have thought a lot of folks in the US would simply love a Nissan badged version of the Zoe, but it seems to me that the two divisions foster a degree of competition between them, and surprising degrees of non-commonality.
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ghosn had said in December, I believe, they were expecting US sales of 20,000 for 2012. The January number was expected to be down because of the December rush (because of the Tax credit) but the lower number for February was unexpected. Hopefully Leaf sales start rising, significantly - but 20k Leaf sales for 2012 is looking like a stretch already (they'd need to sell about 2k a month from here on out). If I was Nissan these are not the kinds of sales numbers I would be wanting to see when I'm less than a year from bringing the biggest Leaf production facility in the world online (more capacity than the Japan Leaf production facility).
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        'he lower number for February was unexpected.' I'm not sure that we know that this was unexpected by Nissan themselves. They have had to send an awful lot of batteries to France to start production there, and they have just started doing the model with the winter pack option. People in the US are also at the end of the year when they have to wait longest to get the money back for their tax credit. You might be right, but you and I both hope not, and the evidence at the moment does not seem conclusive.
          Sasparilla Fizz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Hopefully February is just an exception and we'll see Leaf sales get back closer to 1000 in March (2000 a month - which is what's needed for the 20k forecast - seems like disneyland at this point).
      Dave
      • 3 Years Ago
      Gasoline may be $4 per gallon, however - "Natural gas futures hit $2.27 per million British thermal units Thursday, the lowest price since early 2002. Prices edged up slightly Friday but were still hovering around the lowest level in a decade." http://money.cnn.com/2012/03/09/markets/natural-gas-prices/ Since there are only 114,000 BTUs in a gallon of gas, that means a gallon equivalent of natural gas would be 26 cents per gallon (Although the retail price after compression could easily be two or three times as much or more) So, the real competition is probably CNG (and/or hydrogen produced from CNG)
        PR
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave
        Oddly enough, land speculation is the cause of the below-cost Natural Gas prices. Basically the US laws say that as soon as an extraction lease is issued, the clock starts on how long the lease holder has to drill the first hole. If it isn't drilled by that date, the lease is invalidated. With the invention of the modern NG frac'ing extraction method, lots of land suddenly became valuable for it's gas lease rights. Speculators tried to move quickly in an effort to snatch up those extraction rights. They succeeded, but the cost has been that extraction has had to continue at an unnatural pace, even when those doing the drilling knew it wasn't going to make them any money. Losing money on drilling was still way less of a loss than losing the lease entirely. At least if they kept the lease, future extraction might make up for it. Don't be surprised if the Natural Gas bubble burst within the next few years, and all this cheap natural gas goes away in a huge wave of bankruptcies.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave
        The drilling rig count has dropped greatly in the US, basically because prices are too low to be sustainable. A sustainable price might be something like twice present rates. In the rest of the world they are already a heck of a lot higher, so the world push in car development is likely to be towards electric more than NG. In addition, estimates of 100 years supply in the US not only do not take account of increased use in transport, but are pretty optimistic: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/future_tense/2011/12/is_there_really_100_years_worth_of_natural_gas_beneath_the_united_states_.single.html Of course, even at double present prices NG is still way cheaper than petrol, but the tanks are not cheap and if the vehicle is not redesigned can take up a lot of valuable space. So the US could undoubtedly run more of its transport on NG, but I would see it as more for trucking, taxis etc rather than light personal transport.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave
        DaveMart is correct that the current ~$2.50 prices are basically at below cost. Natural gas is being subsidized by investor money at this point since they've over-drilled. CNG is good for powering vehicles . . . but with modern combined-cycle plants, the efficiency of directly using CNG in a car and indirectly using it in an EV powered by a combined-cycle NG plant is pretty much a wash. So why not go with the EV which can easily move from NG, coal, solar, nuke, etc. . . . what ever is the best electricity source at the current time & place.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave
        @Spec: You can get around 60% efficiency from a combined cycle plant, way more than burning it in a combustion engine car, even after you have taken out the 2-7% transmission losses for the US - it is only around 25 here in the UK, the US is in many places less efficient, partly due to greater distances, more rural use etc, partly due to daffy regulations. Part of the reason for the relatively inefficient average burn to produce electricity is that NG is used to provide swing capacity, and not only is that inherently less efficient but it makes it tough to amortise expensive efficient equipment if it only fires up a few hours a day. Charging electric cars overnight would tend to level the load, and make investment in equipment to improve efficiency worthwhile. It may be the case that to the extent that the grid runs on fossil fuels, little extra gross fuel burn will be needed as extra efficiency can pretty well cover it. Unfortunately renewables, particularly wind but to some extend solar, tend to work against this forcing the less efficient use of natural gas where they form any substantial portion of the grid, as the gas turbines have to be fired up as a supporting act. Producing hydrogen from natural gas and running it through fuel cells is much more in the ball park for efficiency of batteries than using the NG in a combustion engine, even after reformation losses.
        garylai
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave
        I pay $1.14 per therm of natural gas to my house for my furnace. I think that's a pretty typical price nationwide. One therm is 100,000 BTUs. That's more like $1.30 per gallon equivalent.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      Damn. That shows confidence. Enerdel just went through bankruptcy and A123 is barely hanging on. That said, Nissan has an EV that sells, so at least they have place to use those batteries. And if opening the US plant can reduce costs for the Leaf by 20% or so (through currency savings, labor savings, and vehicle transportion savings), Nissan should be in good position.
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      Im afaraid it can turn to be a financial disaster. It's the first bev to appear on the market and it's not selling that well so when competition will apear more broadly from other manufacturer like the ford focus and some other then sale might slow down even more then now. Also if gas price fell down a little bit then consumer might return to ford f150, f250, f350, dodge ram, chevrolet silverado, caterpillar, used well maintain low mileage hummer, bugatti, ferrari, porsche, lexus, subaru 4 wheel drive, boosted modified civic and camaro, bmw fueled by super grade chevron and exxon gasoline from saudi-arabia, gasoline harley-davidson, honda full equip goldwing motorcycle, evinrude watercraft, bombardier recreational skidoo and small watercraft, kawasaki 2 stroke and 4 stroke motocross and enduro, etc. What we got now is early adopter buying a second car for fun, as of yet no normal consumer have bought this car as a main and only car.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        @goodoldgorr Can't wait to give my gas car the heave-ho. Been driving pure on Battery Power for upwards of 15 years. WIth the money I saved in 2008 alone, I was able to send a kid to college. I know many more folks who do not use a guzzler for those short trips where most of the wear-'n-tear happens. That's where EVs shine. You're mistaken that this is the first EV on the market. I bought my RAV4EV 10 years ago, and it's been flawless, serving me perfectly since day one. Alas, 2 years ago I had to make my first investment in parts: new wiper blades. Carlos Ghosn is not a gambler, and has analyzed to the last nit. He's no dummy. Are you against saving money? Do you like shipping our revenues over to foreigners who don't particularly like us? It would behoove you to take heed of the trends, or you'll be sour some more.
        Drivesolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        It's not that the Leaf is not selling well because of demand, it's a mater of available vehicles. You can reference Cars.com to see what the US's inventory is on the Leaf and you will see that it is very low. When you factor in that dealerships must also include their test drive models as part of their inventory then you can see why you're not going to be able to just walk into a Nissan dealership and find a Leaf available on their lot.
          Tagbert
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Drivesolo
          Warren: "You can also see that it is made up of 2011's, and now 2012's, unsold, sitting on the same lots, since last summer." In our area in Washington state, most dealers have one in stock (their demo unit, often a 2011). Some dealers show 2-6 in inventory but most of those are pre-sold customer units that have just not been delivered yet. Once in a while you get lucky and can pickup one where a unit was ordered and then the customer changed their mind by the time it was delivered.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Drivesolo
          If there is still a 3 month waiting list, then there can't be a problem with demand, can there?
          Warren
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Drivesolo
          "You can reference Cars.com to see what the US's inventory is on the Leaf and you will see that it is very low" You can also see that it is made up of 2011's, and now 2012's, unsold, sitting on the same lots, since last summer.
          Sasparilla Fizz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Drivesolo
          The inventory number is different (and not a good measure like it is for the Volt) for the Leaf because dealers don't get to order the car for their own inventory yet. At this point - and through at least the spring - the vehicles are only delivered to the dealers as direct customer orders through Nissan's website. Currently you order it, you wait 3 months (more or less) and you get your Leaf (very little inventory). We'll have to wait till Nissan lets dealers start ordering Leaf's themselves to have the inventory number give us a meaningful number.
        jpadow
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        I've seen three or four LEAFs running around DC as commuter cars.
          Warren
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jpadow
          I have seen three or four pickup trucks, pulling out of a single neighbors driveway, out here in the middle of nowhere.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Gorr I think financial disaster is overblowing it a bit there. Even if sales don't scale up like Nissan was hoping their production lines are flexible (they can build more or less of different vehicles depending on demand) - so the worst case scenario would be that Nissan looses some money on it for a couple of years until sales get higher (pushed by the upward trending price of gasoline), but they are doing very well with their other vehicle sales so it shouldn't be a big deal. Now if Nissan had stopped developing their ICE vehicles and were going to a EV only product line starting in 2013 (can you imagine? Yikes!) then it would be a financial disaster and we'd be saying goodbye to Nissan at this point. As far as the criticism of the car - its not targeted to be a single car owner's car - it is targeted as the secondary car of a two car family - who then uses it as the primary vehicle (since its so cheap to run) and they keep the other car for long trips. If you look at the Leaf forums you'll see alot of the owners having their second cars (Prius's often) that sit most of the time. There's actually a big market for that as Nissan gets the price down.
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        People would buy Bugatti, and caterpillar instead? 'gas prices have dropped, so I am thinking either this $ million Bugatti, or this sweet sweet harvester.' Caterpillar?
        brotherkenny4
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Normal consumers are followers. It takes time to turn the heard. Plus the price is not quite compelling yet. If the Leaf were 32K or 33K with a 7500 tax credit, it would be a plus for the consumer. Neither Ford or GM are close on the price yet. Someone (one of the car companies) is actually going to have to commit to quantity production. Nissan seems to be the only one preparing for it. The question is, will they drop the price a bit. The leaf has just become available where I live, and in many other areas. Obama is trying to get the tax credit to 10K. So do we wait for a better value or just spend stupid like the normal consumer. I'd like to support the technology, but the companies themselves don't seem supportive of it. They seem to be doing it for PR purposes or something. Again, Nissan seems to be making the biggest investment, so it's likely that they are more serious. I expect GM and Ford to want to pull back and hope that gas prices go down.
          goodoldgorr
          • 3 Years Ago
          @brotherkenny4
          There is a big difference between a bev like the nissan leaf and a battery-gasoline hybrid like the volt from chevrolet. In my opinion the volt is more appealing to a broader part of the market. If i was an investor in nissan i would be a little be afraid of the long term trend. For chevrolet the question remain if the volt cost less then 41 000$ to build, if it cost less then the asking price then the future look more bright.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @brotherkenny4
          @theflew: GM might be able to produce a lot of Volts if they could get the price they wanted for them, but that is a very different thing to having designed and set up the model with a view to large scale production. For instance, they specified an engine with the minimum changes from one they were building to hold down development costs, not because it was optimal either from the POV of the cost of production in high volume or in performance. The Leaf has been designed from the start with volumes of hundreds of thousands a year in mind, and as long as they hit their sales targets they will have a clear route through to reduce costs as volume builds. It boils down to that to do the Volt at a cheaper price and so push sales but still remain profitable GM has always been looking to the Volt II, whereas the Leaf should be cheap at high volume.
          theflew
          • 3 Years Ago
          @brotherkenny4
          Actually, I don't agree Nissan is the only one committing to quantity production. The Volt is already built in a plant that could be build 200k a year. Even at this current time GM could build over 4k Volts a month. Demand just isn't there yet to support that level of production.
        JPWhite911
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        I'm glad you don't consider me normal. So I bought it just for fun eh? Sure it's fun to drive, one of the attractions to buying the vehicle, but I must assure you that the majority of the miles I've put on it (7,500 in 7 months) are commuter miles, not Sunday afternoon drives. Even if the LEAF cost just $10 to buy very few would buy it as their only car, range makes the target demographic multi-car families. You are right that it is a financial risk to Nissan. But all successful businesses have to take a risk from time to time. Nissan stuck their neck out when they introduced the CVT to the majority of their line-up in 2007. Here they are sticking their necks out again. I applaud their willingness to innovate in the car market which has seen incremental changes over the last few decades. A sea change is very welcome. Maybe that's why they are doing so well right now.
      • 3 Years Ago
      The projected 3 year demand for sales for the Leaf GLOBALLY are less than the capacity of the plant in Japan. I was told most likely the project in TN will be suspended due to lack of interest in the EV. Jobs promised wont be created it's sad. I hope i'm wrong but i have a really good source.
        Turbo Froggy
        • 3 Years Ago
        Really? Is that why there is a 3 month+ waiting list? The average time on the lot for a Leaf is 7 days, 7 days... Nissan will sell everysingle Leaf they can make. There is a huge worldwide market for EVs that is yep to be tapped. There is somthing very intoxicating about driving a vehicle for the same price as a new Prius, powered by solar panels on your roof, fully for free, and never going to a gas station again. Price of gas goes up, cost to drive to work stays the same. They can't build them fast enough. Go Nissan!
          JPWhite911
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Turbo Froggy
          Agreed the LEAF is a great car, the cost of driving the LEAF hasn't stayed static for me though. It went down 9% since July of last year thanks to falling electric prices. :-)
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        So the lack of demand is why they are now starting up the UK plant with a capacity of 50,000 battery packs a year, the same as Japan? And lack of interest and sales of EV's is why Mitsubishi has just built a new plant, again of 50,000 pa capacity? Perhaps you would share your sources for this information which no-one else is privy to - including Nissan, it seems.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Sharyn: I'm glad to see you have a sense of humour! It is the lack of judgement which is the problem. You really imagine that Ghosn, who is perhaps the most successful and respected car company CEO on the planet, is authorising tens of thousands of dollars in losses on every Leaf? At a $10,000 loss per car that would be a cool half a billion, in a publicly listed company where it would show up on the accounts like a sore thumb. That is not just absurd, it verges on the delusional.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Seriously do YOU really think that NISSAN can sell more than 50K leafs GLOABLLY the answer is NO. Nissan is using technology from the 90's the only difference is one chemical compound. and the cells are layered (like a cake) instead of coiled. The care "really" cost 80k each to produce and they got 1.4 Billion taxpayer dollars to build a car that people don't want to buy. I was told by someone that worked with the EV that once the GM VOLT got HOV status the leaf was gonna be crushed.
      PR
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Tennessee built Leafs will cost Nissan less to build. If they aren't seeing the sales volume they want 14 or 16 months from now, they can cut the price from the current price. I realize that the death of the EV1 led to a decade of pessimism in the EV sector, but we're at the tipping point where every year EV's just keep getting better. I don't see the justification for all the negativity. It reminds me of back in 2008 when the entire global economy was crashing, and automobile sales overall were tanking, and everyone was saying the entire green car industry was dead.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PR
        Why would a company spend money to make a car that people are NOT buying? Elon Musk of Tesla said the Leaf was being built with dinasaur technology. They told congress the car got 100 miles per charge and it only gets officially 73 mpc. In the winter "if" you want heat your lucky if you get 55 mpc. The whole concept needts to be tweaked. Had NISSAN had the technology they told congress they had maybe MORE people would have purchased them. If the car is 20% cheaper when built in Japan it's then only 64K to make instead of 80... the difference is the Yen. The Pet Rock could be a better investment.
        JakeY
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PR
        "I'm an advocate of EVs but EVs were just not viable back around 1999. Gas cost $1.50/gallon at the time. And the original EV1s were filled with lead-acid batteries that were heavy & not long-lasting. NiMHs helped but they were still expensive . . . and toxic." True, but if we stuck to it, no doubt the EV industry would be a lot further along today. Keep in mind the hybrids didn't sell well either, but now it's one of the best selling segments (at least for Toyota). And remember, the 1997 T-zero used lithium batteries (and inspired the Tesla Roadster). The 1998 Nissan Altra also used lithium batteries.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PR
        "I realize that the death of the EV1 led to a decade of pessimism in the EV sector" I'm an advocate of EVs but EVs were just not viable back around 1999. Gas cost $1.50/gallon at the time. And the original EV1s were filled with lead-acid batteries that were heavy & not long-lasting. NiMHs helped but they were still expensive . . . and toxic. Gas now costs $4/gallon and Li-Ions provide decent battery technology. Of course we always want better batteries but the current Li-Ion technology can do the job as the Volt, Leaf, Tesla, and Mitsubishi-i are showing.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Well the price of gas is directly related to the price of the car. If the price of gas is high, then you can justify a higher premium for the EV. For example, if an EV will save you $2000/year in gasoline savings then it is easy to justify paying $10K more for the EV version instead of a gas version since you'll get that $10K back within 5 years. But regarding the Prius C . . . it is hard to make a case for an EV over the Prius C since it is cheap up front and burns not much fuel. But the Prius C does have its down sides. It has a really slow 0 to 60 acceleration.
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          The price of gas is certainly a factor, but I think the two biggest items (for me at least) are the price of the car and the range. The leaf, cool as it might be, is expensive and has a problem (again, for me at least) with range. Now is the case of the Model S, I would certainly give that a look if I decided it was time for my mid life crisis Corvette. The tesla competes quite well on all counts. Charging time may not be the same as putting gas in the corvette, but how close it is in performance, plus the green factor (I could accuse liberal friends of destroying the environment, which I already do with my ULEV Flex fuel Ranger, by having the tesla, and that is just good fun). Take the Prius C - right now that would be on the top of my list for a small car. Toyota? Good. Gas mileage? Good. Price? Good. The fact it is a hybrid is a bonus. No apologies, no, 'sure it doesn't go far or fast, but it is green!' issues. Just a good car for a good price.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @Spec: I fully expect high efficiency ICE cars and hybrids to delay the triumph of BEVs and FCEVs. Cars like theToyota FT-Bh will provide formidable competition. The same thing happened in the early days of the railroad, when stage coaches finally got their act together. It won't help in the end, mainly because of point source pollution.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @Ezee: The big cost on cars is not fuel, but depreciation. Very low maintenance costs on pure electric vehicles should feed through into low depreciation as folks get used to them. The situation is confused by the wear on the battery, but since they are dropping by around 8% pa replacement cost should be reasonable. The bottom line is that if you don't do huge mileage but around average there would seem no reason why you should not be able to happily run your BEV for 20 years without incurring excessive maintenance costs. Since you have to change your ICE after around 5 years to avoid escalating maintenance costs, then it seems to me that fuel costs aside you will be well in pocket over its lifetime.
        Dave
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PR
        Ghosn has predicted that BEVs could reach up to about 10% of the market. That sounds about right to me.
      Turbo Froggy
      • 3 Years Ago
      This new battery plant will be larger by square footage (not cubic footage) as the Boeing Everett plant. That is big, ya ya, not small no no... Mass production will get the costs down, and Nissan is doing it right. You can't even buy an AC motor, inverter and battery pack for what the Leaf is selling for, and that is with existing production. After a few years of ramp up, Nissan will be able to get the price down so they can sell at post credit prices after they sell 200,000 Leafs and the credit expires.
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is gr8 news, coupled with the fact of Envia's battery being able to hold so much more power than existing batteries. Check out my blog http://engineergreen.blogspot.com/2012/03/envia-battery-technology-aargon_04.html for comments from Envia's CEO. As well there are a few articles on Leafs and the Level 3 charger that Nissan started offering just recently.
      lne937s
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Smyrna plant had 1300 employees... in 1981 when it first opened. 25 years later in 2006, it employed 6700 Nissan employes and 2400 on-site contractors. I am pretty sure, with sales growth from the past 6 years, it is even higher now. http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2006/02/05/209617.html So the battery plant really is not doubling the amount of workers at Nissan's Smyrna plant from current levels... Maybe a 10-15% increase.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @lne937s
        This is a new plant Nissan built.... it is not even finished yet.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @lne937s
        http://green.autoblog.com/2011/01/30/construction-of-nissans-smyrna-battery-plant-on-schedule/
      DaveMart
      • 3 Years Ago
      'Nissan's plant in Smyrna, about 25 miles southeast of Nashville, will be able to produce as many as 200,000 Leafs and 150,000 battery packs a year; Its the other way round. You can use a battery pack in something else, but an electric car without a battery is not a lot of use. Battery production in the UK plant is starting about now, probably with most of the production to supply Renault EV production, including the Zoe which debuts in June.
        Warren
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        "Its the other way round. You can use a battery pack in something else, but an electric car without a battery is not a lot of use." DaveMart has it right. If Nissan is lucky, those batteries will end up in hybrid trucks , and SUV's, so Americans can still afford their lifestyle. Maybe a few will find their way into thousand pound hypercars, for guys like me.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Warren
          My guess is that Nissan will start a NV200 production line to build vans
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        Sending them a tip does no good. The way in which a green car blog can be full of tripe with various fantastical racing concepts and so on but ignore the finalisation of an electric car which comes for something approaching half price for any competitor, ex battery which is leased admittedly, beggars belief,
          Joeviocoe
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Their Tip System broke months ago. I think Sebastian mentioned it doesn't work. I don't know why they haven't fixed it or gave an alternative email address or something.
        ScubaChris
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        The Zoe is the EV I'm waiting for more than any other. I'm really surprised that ABG have still not posted the latest info on the production version, days after the Geneva reveal. They've missed the boat on this one.
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is gr8 news, coupled with the fact of Envia's battery being able to hold so much more power than existing batteries. Check out my http://engineergreen.blogspot.com/2012/03/envia-battery-technology-aargon_04.html for comments from Envia's CEO. As well there are a few articles on Leafs and the Level 3 charger that Nissan started offering just recently.
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