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Coming soon to select Ford dealers, at least those on the coasts, is the most efficient five-passenger car in America, the 2012 Ford Focus Electric, which the EPA has certified gets 105 miles per gallon equivalent, combined. This is better than what the Blue Oval was estimating publicly in December, when it said the all-electric Focus should get 100 MPGe. The Focus EV is also rated for 110 MPGe in the city and 99 MPGe on the highway. As you can read in the press release below, Ford is using the official numbers to go after the Nissan Leaf for the all-electric passenger car market. Ford says its new electric car:

... achieves a combined rating of 105 MPGe, topping Nissan Leaf by 6 MPGe while also offering more motor power, passenger room and standard features. Customers can make more use of this efficiency with Ford's faster charging technology that can recharge Focus Electric in about half the time of Nissan Leaf.

To compare with some other combined MPGe ratings for plug-in vehicles on the market or coming soon: the 2012 Chevrolet Volt gets 94 MPGe (one better than the 2011 model), the Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid gets 95 MPGe, the Nissan Leaf gets 99 MPGe, the Mitsubishi i is rated at 112 MPGe, and the current champion, the Tesla Roadster 2.0, officially gets 119 MPGe.

The EPA also says the Focus EV will have a range of 76 miles. As Ford is quick to point out, again, that's three miles more than the Leaf. Given the variances of EV ranges based on driving style and outside influences, those three miles won't make all that much real-world difference to most people, but it does give the engineering team one more thing to brag about.

For all the comparisons that Ford makes in today's announcement, it does leave one thing out: the Leaf's one big numerical advantage. The 2012 Leaf starts at just $35,200, while the Focus EV starts at $39,200.
Show full PR text
Ford Focus Electric Becomes America's Most Fuel-Efficient Five-Passenger Vehicle with 110 MPGe EPA Rating

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency certifies the 2012 Ford Focus Electric as America's most fuel-efficient five-passenger vehicle with a 110 miles per gallon equivalent (MPGe) city rating

Focus Electric achieves a combined rating of 105 MPGe, topping Nissan Leaf by 6 MPGe while also offering more motor power, passenger room and standard features

Customers can make more use of this efficiency with Ford's faster charging technology that can recharge Focus Electric in about half the time of Nissan Leaf

Ford gives customers the power of choice with 10 fuel-efficiency leaders across segments and powertrain technologies


DEARBORN, Mich., March 2, 2012 – Ford's all-new Focus Electric is now officially America's most fuel-efficient five-passenger car with a certified 110 miles per gallon equivalent (MPGe) city rating and 99 MPGe on the highway.

Focus Electric also has been certified by the EPA to offer 105 MPGe combined, beating Nissan Leaf by 6 MPGe while offering more motor power and more standard features. Focus Electric's 99 MPGe highway certification bests the 92 MPGe rating for the Leaf.

Focus Electric bests Nissan Leaf in other ways, too – more passenger room and a faster charging system that allows for a full recharge in nearly half the time of Nissan Leaf.

The Focus line soon will be joined by the new 2013 Ford Fusion – aiming to be America's most fuel-efficient gas- and hybrid-powered midsize sedans – to help create one of the industry's most fuel-efficient car lineups. The Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid is projected to become the world's most fuel-efficient midsize sedan by achieving more than 100 MPGe in electric mode.

"Ford is giving customers the power of choice for leading fuel economy regardless of what type of vehicle or powertrain technology they choose," said Eric Kuehn, chief nameplate engineer, Focus Electric. "The Focus and Fusion are great examples of how we transformed our fleet of cars, utilities and trucks with leading fuel efficiency."

The EPA-approved Focus Electric label also certifies that the car has a range of 76 miles on a single charge compared with the 73-mile range of the Leaf. The Focus Electric can be driven up to 100 miles on a single charge depending on driving habits. The average driver drives 29 miles a day, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics website.

The approved label also will say customers could save $9,700 in fuel costs over the course of five years compared with the average new vehicle. Comparative savings could go even higher if the current trend of rising gas prices continues. In California alone, the cost for a gallon of gas rose 20 cents in a seven-day period that ended last week.

Fuel-efficiency champs
Focus Electric is the flagship of Ford's transformed lineup that features 10 vehicles with leading fuel economy. Ford's other fuel-efficiency leaders include:

•2013 Fusion 1.6-liter EcoBoost: Projected 37 mpg highway that would make it America's most fuel-efficient non-rechargeable midsize sedan
•2013 Escape 1.6-liter EcoBoost: Expected to be the most fuel-efficient crossover of its kind with 33 mpg highway
•2013 Taurus 2.0-liter EcoBoost: Expected to deliver best-in-class 31 mpg highway
•2012 Edge 2.0-liter EcoBoost: Delivers 30 mpg highway, besting all SUVs its size or larger and even some cars such as the Honda Civic Si
•2012 Explorer 2.0-liter EcoBoost: One of the most fuel-efficient seven-passenger SUVs on the market, delivering 28 mpg highway
•2013 Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid: Aiming to become the world's most fuel-efficient midsize sedan with a projected 100 MPGe rating
•2013 Fusion Hybrid: Expected to become the world's most fuel-efficient non-rechargeable midsize sedan with 47 mpg
•2012 Fiesta: Offers up to 40 mpg highway and class-leading 33 mpg combined rating
•2012 F-150: The most fuel-efficient full-size pickup, with V6 models delivering best-in-class 23 mpg highway and 17 mpg city

"We've been working for three years to make the Focus Electric America's most fuel-efficient vehicle of its kind," said Chuck Gray, Ford chief engineer of Global Core Engineering Hybrid and Electric Vehicles. "The entire group feels like a sports team that has just won a major championship. It's a good feeling to be at this point now."

Unlike competitors that have designed electric and hybrid vehicles from scratch, Focus Electric benefits from being based on the fuel version of Ford's global C-segment car.

"Focus Electric shares many of the same premium components and features as its gasoline-powered counterpart while delivering distinct efficiencies and a uniquely exciting driving experience," said Kuehn.

In addition to boosting quality, Ford's strategic decision to electrify vehicle platforms – instead of creating one-off vehicles – allows the company to offer customers more choices as part of its fuel-efficient product lineup.

Elec-tech
Focus Electric features an advanced charging system that allows the car's battery to fully recharge in four hours – nearly half the time of Nissan Leaf – using available 240-volt outlets that can be installed in residential garages.

Faster charging with 240 volts also can extend range as drivers can more quickly recharge between stops – up to 20 miles per charge hour – so they can significantly improve a car's range during a busy day of driving by recharging multiple times.

For those who need to charge up while away from home, the number of charging stations continues to rise. In the last 10 months the number of charging stations in the United States has risen from 750 to 5,507, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

To cut charging costs at home, a unique value charging feature powered by Microsoft is designed to help owners in the U.S. charge their vehicles at the cheapest utility rates, which can make charging the Focus Electric less costly than charging the Nissan Leaf.

Other standard features on Focus Electric include Ford's Rear View Camera System, MyKey®, rain-sensing windshield wipers and Reverse Sensing System.

Tech sharing
Many of the technologies in Focus Electric are shared across Ford's electrified vehicle lineup. Some of the shared or soon-to-be-shared features include:

•SYNC® with MyFord Touch® offers multiple ways – including voice commands – for customers to manage and control their phone, navigation, entertainment and climate functions. Plug-in hybrids and all-electric models have additional options for monitoring information like battery state of charge
•MyFord Mobile enables access via smartphone or Web-based interface to perform key tasks, such as monitoring a vehicle's state of charge and current range or locating charge stations and planning routes to find them
•SmartGauge® with EcoGuide provides instantaneous fuel economy so drivers can adjust driving behavior accordingly if needed
•Regenerative braking captures and reuses more than 95 percent of the braking energy normally lost during the braking process
•Hybrid transmission, designed by Ford engineers in-house, is capable of operating at high speeds and in a smooth, fuel-efficient manner at the same time
•Lithium-ion batteries – the lithium-ion battery pack in Focus Electric is covered by an eight-year/100,000-mile component warranty
•Charge port (for electric and plug-in vehicles), conveniently located on the driver's side and near the front of the car, activates a light ring that illuminates the port twice when plugged in. The light ring then illuminates in quadrants as the car charges. Each quadrant represents 25 percent of the maximum battery charge
•Recycled fiber made from 100 percent post-consumer and post-industrial content is used in the seat fabric with the equivalent of 22 plastic, 16-ounce water bottles in each car

Production of the Focus Electric began in December 2011 at Ford's Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, Mich. More information about MAP can be found here.

Ford will ramp up Focus Electric retail production in the first half of 2012 for dealership availability in California, New York and New Jersey. By the end of 2012, Focus Electric will be available in 19 markets across the U.S.

More information about Ford's electrified vehicle lineup – including press releases, technical specifications and other related material – can be found online here. Photos of the Focus Electric can be found here.

# # #

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 164,000 employees and about 70 plants worldwide, the company's automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 119 Comments
      Basil Exposition
      • 2 Years Ago
      The 6mpge improvement is nice, but what really makes this vehicle superior to the Leaf is the design - it looks 1000 times better than the doofy, dorky Leaf.
      XJ Yamaha
      • 2 Years Ago
      Until these cars can drive 300+ mile per charge and be recharged as quick and simply as gasoline vehicles, they will never acquire the market share that regular gasoline engines have. I support electric vehicles all the way, the technology just needs to advance quite a bit further.
      Randy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Now I understand the pricing. At first I was concerned, now it makes sense. It gets better MPGes, and offers more motor power, quicker, faster, more passenger room, more standard standard features which add up to thousands, twice as fast charging (half the time of the leaf), looks like a normal car that doesn't scream "eco box", has a 100,000-mile component warranty on the batteries and uses custom software to charge your Focus when utility bills are lowest based on time of day! Plus with the tax credits! Hmmm - this i a nice ride all things considered.
      merlot066
      • 2 Years Ago
      Just because the Volt is more practical to some of you (not that 90% of you would actually buy one anyway) that doesn't mean that the Focus Electric is a bad car. Ford has the C-Max Hybrid and Energi (plug-in hybrid like the Chevy Volt) coming in the Fall. And the $4k difference over the Leaf gets you more power, more space, more standard features, more driving range, and charging in half the time. Not to mention Ford has established itself as more than competent in electric drivetrains with the Escape Hybrid and especially the Fusion Hybrid.
      merlot066
      • 2 Years Ago
      Fact check, the vast majority of electricity produced in the Focus Electric's initial release area is made by natural gas, followed in a distant second by coal, then a mix of oil, nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric for the rest. The coal and natural gas which creates the vast majority of our country's electricity is almost entirely brought up in the USA, while the gas we put into our cars comes almost entirely from other countries. http://www.eia.gov/state/state-energy-profiles.cfm?sid=CA Also, our electric grid is not going to collapse because of a few thousand electric cars being on the road. There is an ever increasing number of people putting solar panels on their houses and utility companies like PSE&G in New Jersey are installing solar pannels on telephone poles to produce extra renewable energy. And as if that wasn't enough, one of the other edges the Focus Electric has over its competitors is the charging app which will automatically charge the car at off-peak/less costly times. I don't get why you'd want to hate on electric cars. At its most basic level it's a way for some people to stop using gasoline so gas prices can go down for the rest of us.
        Jason Ross
        • 2 Years Ago
        @merlot066
        There were plenty of haters when the "horseless carriage" was invented. Who in their right mind would really give up a trusty old horse in favor of some mechanical contraption? Plus, what if you ran out of gasoline? With the horse the infrastructure is already there -- stables, feed, etc. There's no sense in developing "gasoline stations". How preposterous! Not to mention people who said powered flight was impossible, then the sound barrier wouldn't be broken, we'd never make it to the moon, computers had little practical use, radio broadcasts were a silly idea and any number of other technological advances that we take for granted today.
      Chris Mousseau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Electric cars are just starting to come to a reality, and I am glad to see more practical cars in the marketplace. With competition comes improvements that all customers can reap the benefits to.
      Jason Allen
      • 2 Years Ago
      This car is nearly perfect. I can't wait to get it! More room, power and mpg's than the leaf, which is a very good car itself. If you have ever whined about expensive gas then you have to root for as many people as possible to buy these BEV's. Even if you don't want one yourself you should want everyone who is tempted to go full electric to buy in. Hating on electric cars is stupid, dangerously stupid. Encourage as many people as you can to get off gasoline. All the more for enthusiasts and racing as well as helping keep prices as low as possible. How do you haters respond to these facts? I really want to know.
      answerinmachine3
      • 2 Years Ago
      Although I agree the price is high on the surface when you just compare price/electric mile or price/space, I am hesitant to say that this is a worse deal than other related cars. From my understanding of the type of people that buy and drive these cars are more concerned about technology than saving the planet. If this car has all of the tech of a top of the line focus with the added connectivity of communicating information like battery status with your car through something like a smart phone. If you want a small car whose main selling point is being an electric car, its hard to argue not buying the i or leaf. But if you want a more complete package and something that will keep you technologically involved with your car, this may be a better choice. I consider this to be something closer to a short range tesla than anything else.
      Xedicon
      • 2 Years Ago
      I've yet to see a plug in hybrid or full electric car that comes anywhere near its claimed range. Will Ford be the first?! Doubt it, but I hope so.
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      Much better looking and more fun to drive than the Leaf.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        sirxxxxx
        • 2 Years Ago
        Rick, You already posted your Ignorant omment 5 posts below. Stop scamming and stop posting false information.
        usa1
        • 2 Years Ago
        You are either a troll or very ignorant. I'm not sure which.
      David MacGillis
      • 2 Years Ago
      What a screaming bag of fail. 76 Miles and $40,000? For the same price you can get a car that has a backup ENGINE that can get you off the side of the highway in the middle of the night.
        ALafya
        • 2 Years Ago
        @David MacGillis
        You need to account for $7500 Federal tax credit and some states, e.g. CA provide up to $5000 state tax credit which brings it down to $27.5. This credit is only for early adopters, to encourage more people to buy it and for car companies to get better and cheaper cars later. For most daily commuters (not all) this is more than enough, me included, though I would be interested in the next wave of these, which by then will probably have x2 the range. You can say it is still not enough for all purposes ; right, that's why families have a 2nd car.
          Just Stuff
          • 2 Years Ago
          @ALafya
          That credit, you still have to put the money out up front. I can't afford that.
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