The brand-new Toyota Prius Plug-In has arrived in California, and Toyota wants to make sure that potential buyers know that the plug-in hybrid can be up to $4,000 dollars lower than the sticker price might make it seem, plus other benefits.

The new Prius qualifies for the State of California's Clean Vehicle Rebate Program (CVRP) worth $1,500. The corded Prius can also get California's HOV lane access sticker and qualifies for a $2,500 federal income tax credit. This is the same program that gives Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt buyers up to $7,500, but the Prius Plug-in has a smaller battery and thus only gets a third as much money back.

The Prius Plug-in Hybrid is expected to get 95 miles per gallon equivalent, can go up to 11 miles in pure electric mode and, once the battery is emptied out, gets an EPA combined rating of 50 mpg. The car will have two trim lines, the standard for $32,000 and the Advanced for $39,525. Details on the differences between the two (mostly infotainment updates but also things like the Lexus-like heads-up display and dynamic cruise control) are available after the jump.
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Toyota Confirms Prius Plug-In's Eligibility for an Additional State of California Consumer Incentive and Its EPA Mileage Rating
TORRANCE, Calif., February 23, 2012 – As the 2012 Prius Plug-in models begin to arrive at dealerships, Toyota Motor Sales, Inc. announces that it has been approved for the State of California's Clean Vehicle Rebate Program (CVRP).

Designed to promote the use of Zero Emissions Vehicles (ZEV) and related clean vehicle technologies, the CVRP is a consumer incentive made available in addition to the $2,500 Federal Tax credit¹ offered for qualified vehicles (more information available at: http://www.irs.gov/businesses/article/0,,id=219867,00.html). The 2012 Prius Plug-in also offers consumers eligibility for the State of California's HOV lane sticker (information found at http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/carpool/carpool.html).

The CVRP program offers rebates to individuals, business owners, non-profit groups, and government entities that purchase or lease new eligible zero-emission or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Under this program, the Prius Plug-in is eligible for a $1,500 rebate that will be provided to consumers on a first come first-served basis. These grants are available when a vehicle is either purchased or leased for 36 months or longer. The CVRP is funded by the California Air Resources Board (ARB). Additional information about the CVRP incentive and application resources can be found on the http://cvrp.energycenter.org website.

The first-ever Prius Plug-in Hybrid, combines the benefits of the third-generation Prius Liftback's Hybrid Synergy Drive with a dedicated electric driving (EV) capability, in a package that is priced more competitively than most currently available plug-in hybrids or pure Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV). The Prius Plug-injoins the Prius Family, which includes the third-generation Prius Liftback, the versatile new Prius v and the all-new subcompact Prius c, which will be available in March of 2012. The Prius Plug-in features a new Lithium-ion battery, which boosts its overall fuel economy and offers convenient charging times of only 2.5-3 hours using a standard 120V outlet or 1.5 hours using 240V.

While in EV Mode, the Prius Plug-in is rated by the EPA to drive up to 11 miles. It's also capable of traveling up to 62 mph using electric power alone. During EV Mode driving, the Prius Plug-in is rated at 95MPGe (miles per gallon equivalent). In hybrid mode, it has an EPA combined mileage rating of 50 mpg. This means that when the EV Mode is depleted, Prius Plug-in still obtains the same estimated high fuel economy rating as Prius Liftback. With its Lithium-ion power and extended electric vehicle mode, the Prius Plug-in is EPA-rated for a total driving range of 540 miles.

It will be available in two models, the Prius Plug-in and the Prius Plug-in Advanced. The Prius Plug-in Hybrid model comes equipped with an abundance of standard features including LED Daytime Running Lights, Smart Key on three doors, Display Audio with Navigation and Entune™ with integrated backup camera, Touch Tracer Display, heated front seats, Remote Climate (A/C only), EV/ECO/POWER modes, unique15-inch 10-spoke alloy wheels, enhanced Multi-information Display and much more.

The Prius Plug-in Advanced model adds additional standard features including Premium HDD Navigation with Entune™ and JBL® GreenEdge™, Plug-in Hybrid Applications through a user's smartphone (Charge Management, Remote Climate, Vehicle Finder, Charging Station Map², and ECO Dashboard²), Head-up Display, Dynamic Radar Cruise Control, Pre-Collision System, LED headlamps with auto on/off feature and integrated fog lamps, SofTex-trimmed seating, an eight-way power adjustable driver's seat, Safety Connect and more.

The base MSRP for the Prius Plug-in Hybrid is $32,000. The Prius Plug-in Hybrid Advanced has an MSRP of $39,525. Both Prius Plug-in models are eligible for up to $4,000 worth of government-supported consumer incentives ($2,500 federal tax credit¹ and $1500 worth of the State of California's Clean Vehicle Rebate Program), in addition to offering eligibility for California's High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane sticker.

At launch, the Prius Plug-in Hybrid will be available in the following 14 states: California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. A national rollout of Prius Plug-in is planned for 2013.

¹ Individual purchasers of a Prius Plug-in vehicle may be able to take advantage of the Federal
Qualified Plug-in Electric Drive Motor Vehicle tax credit. The Prius Plug-in vehicle tax credit is
confirmed to be $2,500. Individuals should consult with their own tax advisors to determine
the specific amount of benefit, if any, that they may be able to claim on their federal income
tax returns.

² Charging Station Map and ECO Dashboard Apps available summer 2012; all other apps available at launch.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 158 Comments
      Car Guy
      • 3 Years Ago
      11 miles in EV mode? Really? The average commute, round trip, is 30 miles. I think any EV with less than a 50 mile range is a waste............
        paulwesterberg
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        I live ten miles from work, if I could plug in and recharge at work then I would hardly use any gas at all. I think they will eventually allow charging at work, but they don't have any plugs installed yet.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        Its 15 miles. I have no idea where ABG got 11 miles from.
        oollyoumn
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        Like the Volt this is not an EV. 11 mile is about double my daily commute. It doesn't have to fit everyone, or even the average. There are still valid reasons for this car.
          theflew
          • 2 Months Ago
          @oollyoumn
          @usbseawolf2000 - The Volt doesn't "shift" it will use it's motor/generator as a motor to vary the gear ratio, so the main traction motor can lower it's RPM to increase efficiency. There are no gears "shifting" they're synchronized clutches to engage the ICE to the generator, the generator to the ring gear, or the ring to the case - that's it. Also I drive my Volt well above 65 mph and get 200 MPG. No need to make thing up. Here's my Volt http://www.voltstats.net/Stats/Details/222
          theflew
          • 2 Months Ago
          @oollyoumn
          The difference is the Volt is an EV while it has sufficient charge. I understand why GM wanted to call the Volt an EREV versus plugin hybrid. All the plugin hybrids coming out will be limited to approximately ~60 mph top speed electric and then only with lite throttle use. The Volt is electric from 1 - 100 mph no matter what you do with the throttle while it has sufficient charge. Depending on your drive even though your commute is under 11 miles you might use very little electric miles in the PiP if those are highway miles going greater than 62 mph.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Months Ago
          @oollyoumn
          @theflew - MGb rpm was lowered after disengaging clutch #3, engaging clutch #2 and then reengaging clutch #3. That constitutes as shifting a gear. It shifted from a single speed to variable ratio. The stats said, 84% of your miles were driven with electricity, not gas. Your actual gas mileage is 32 MPG. How much electricity did you use? How many times did you recharge? How many hours did the recharge take in total? Fueleconomy.gov said a typical Volt in Powell, OH would emit 290 gram of CO2 per mile (*1). It also said 50 MPG Prius would emit 222 gram/mile (178 tailpipe + 44 upstream). 1) http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?zipcode=43065&vehicle=volt&action=labelResults 2) http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=31767&#tab2
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Months Ago
          @oollyoumn
          Volt will shift a gear around 60 mph. It has a mechanical transmission with 3 clutches. Volt owner manual also said going above 55 mph would reduce the range noticeably. Most Volt owners end up driving below 60mph (from what I have seen).
        usbseawolf2000
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        Car commuting distances were found to average 12.6 miles nationally. http://www.greencarcongress.com/2012/01/range-20120112.html
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      The CVRP program still has money? I though it ran out of money long ago? Is is divided into different vehicles such that maybe it ran out for the Leaf but still has rebates for other vehicles?
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice to see these finally getting to CA, about time Toyota. All that said, the more plug-ins the better. I hope Toyota sells all they can make. The more plug-ins in the market the better. Especially with gasoline where it is. Bring them on. It'll be interesting to see how many Toyota is producing and bringing over here (with HOV access I'm guessing they'll sell all the $32k ones they can).
      DaveMart
      • 3 Years Ago
      It will be eligible for the full £5000 rebate here in the UK, as we have not got GM to feed and take care of, and that is who got the level for the full rebate set at 16kwh, by 'coincidence'.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hello !!! The Prius PlugIn can do 15 miles, not 11 on EV only.. This information was provided by Toyota.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        Are those 15 EPA miles, or 15 Obama miles?
        Rotation
        • 3 Years Ago
        IFreedom45: The Prius PHEV has ZERO all-electric range. It cannot go highway speeds in EV mode.
      HollywoodF1
      • 3 Years Ago
      Volt vs Prius Daily Cost: Assume (EPA numbers): --Prius= 95 MPGE for 11 mi, + 50 MPGE thereafter --Volt= 93 MPGE for 35 mi, + 35 MPGE thereafter --$4.00/gallon gas --Full charge at mile-zero --Prius and Volt are effectively cost-equivalent for the first 24-miles. At best, the Prius is $0.01 cheaper at the 11th mile. --Volt is then cheaper from the 24th mile, where fuel costs are equal, until the 66th mile, where they are equal again. At best, the Volt is $0.87 cheaper at the 35th mile where it switches over to regeneration mode. --After the 66th mile, the Prius is then less expensive again. In a Prius, you will save $1 for every 29-miles driven after the 66th mile. So how far you drive between charges determines which is the better fuel cost value. Statistically, most Americans would find that a typical daily drive of less than 66-miles will give the advantage to the Volt. But if you usually drive farther, or are inclined not to charge daily, the Prius would have an advantage for you.
        Rotation
        • 2 Months Ago
        @HollywoodF1
        MPGe is energy equivalent, not price equivalent. A gallon of gas has about 33kWh of energy in it, but a gallon of gas costs $4 and 33kWh of electricity costs between $1.65 and $4. Then there's the problem that if you are rolling a significant number of miles, you're probably doing them on the highway where the Prius doesn't even operate in electric mode, it's some kind of blended mode.
        Richard Lam
        • 2 Months Ago
        @HollywoodF1
        Its hard to justify either of these vehicles on a pure cost basis alone. When you add in other factors such as national security, comfort, features, cool factor. I think the Volt wins by a large margin :).
        Nick
        • 2 Months Ago
        @HollywoodF1
        HollywoodF1 Many Volt owners pride themselves for burning less than 5 gallons a month, so in theory, the Volt can be a lot cheaper to operate depending on how you use it.
          theflew
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Nick
          I agree... I drove my Volt for 2 months with the gas the dealer filled it up with when purchases ~ 2500 miles. It's only been to the gas station 3 times since it was purchased last September (18 gallons of gas purchased - 5108 miles)
        shinichi
        • 2 Months Ago
        @HollywoodF1
        That is the theory. Let's see how many Prius owners going to drive 10.000 miles on a tank of gas. I'm not trolling here, I am realy curious. Maybe thats the true definition of EEV.
        Ford Future
        • 2 Months Ago
        @HollywoodF1
        Those are great calculations. But, let me say again. GM, Volt a great product, but look at how Toyota Prices the Prius. GM needs economies of scale, they need a more basic model at a lower price, to help sales. Or, is the Volt supposed to be a kind of Cadillac EV?
          Julius
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Ford Future
          Actually, the Volt IS being spread out - Opel Ampera is already in production; Holden Volt, etc. are due soon. Also slated for production is the Cadillac ELR... And remember, this is version 1.0 for the Voltec system. The gas motor is off-the-shelf by necessity. I'm sure with some optimization for the second-generation, the cost will go down and the capabilities will go up. Remember the first US Prius only got 41 MPG, and cost 60% (MSRP base $19,995) more than a comparable Corolla. Now it gets 50% with only a 40% premium (MSRP base $24,000) over a Corolla.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Extreme weather patterns are projected results of global warming. What i've read is that the weather often gets more extreme. The hotter temperatures cause more evaporation, often causing massive floods.. it also causes some areas to dry out to extreme levels. It also can increase tropical storm activity. Global warming, as predicted, does not just make things hotter. Many records have been shattered year after year. The areas i grew up in never used to get past 90deg.. now they regularly experience 110F+ summers.. this is on the coast, BTW. very odd.
      marcopolo
      • 3 Years Ago
      @Fordinsight, and 2WM, You are both ignoring the real science of climate change, you see what you want to see, by reading into too much into a purely localised phenomenon. That's not the effect of climate change! That's just the unpredictability of the weather! Crying 'Wolf' about a local drought or a flood, is not "climate change" ! As soon as the drought breaks, or weather patterns reverse, you lose all creditability! Climate change is a global phenomenon, sustained, and unprecedented. If New York City was hit by a blizzard, it's not necessarily anything new. New York has had blizzards before. In pre-industrial times, localised weather patterns produced dramatic phenomenon (Grapes and crops grew in Greenland) . But these were the results of completely natural weather patterns. The danger of attributing every bit of bad weather to climate change, only damages the creditability of climate change when these local conditions naturally reverse! 2WM, I used Australia as an example because it was probably the most politically active climate change nation 2006-2010. The problem for the drought predictors was that they had forgotten the words of the national poem. "I love a sunburnt country, A land of sweeping plains, Of ragged mountain ranges, Of droughts and flooding rains." (Dorothy Mckellear 1904) The point is the hysteria about a local drought , (albeit 10 years) , was not the product of global warming, but a naturally occurring weather pattern. By attributing it wrongly to irreversible GW, destroyed all creditability in the public mind when the drought broke so devastatingly. The pattern was identical to the 1878 drought/flood cycle. Dr Tim Flannery, couldn't be elected dog catcher in Queensland! Not because GW/Climate change isn't valid, but because in his desire to prove his cause he was recklessly alarmist and cried 'Wolf"!
      Nick
      • 2 Months Ago
      EZEE There's a number of bills out there aimed at taxing EVs in compensation for the lack of tax stream from oil.
      EZEE
      • 2 Months Ago
      Less money for road taxes, however.... Not that I mind, just pointing that out...
      EZEE
      • 3 Years Ago
      @2 Wheel/Ford (if anyone is still reading) I think the point is, happening or not, there are many opportunists that cause for doubt. We hear many predictions that haven't happened (we have crossed the point of no return many times, and that date is just slid into the future), and in other cases, localized issues ARE talked about as global warming, but then, when the localized weather goes against the prediction, we hear, "weather is not climate." Heads I win, tails you lose. As it has also been documented, there have been 4 - 5 global warming/ice age scares since 1900. Each with how we are all going to die. Many of the predictions, well meaning or not, have not happened as predicted. I honestly have no clue - as I have said before, climate is complicated, so I don't want to come off as knowing what I am talking about. In many cases however, we see people who seem to know, switch sides. When they do, they are either incompetent people bought off by big enviro or big oil, or wise sages of reason, against the forces of special interest big oil/big enviro. Nobel prize winners on each side. Like anything else politically now days, it is "Believe what I believe or else I will call you evil and try to ruin you." Even if the case of hotter and more evaporation - that is one area where there has been intense debate. Will there be more cloud cover, or not? More evaporation and more rain? More clouds? Or more like the sahara? Extra hurricanes 5 - 6 years ago were global warming, and we were going to have more and more! Now...not so much. A normal weather pattern keeping them down, but ready for more to occur? No global warming? Poor prediction? El Nino, La Nina? Will southern states turn into deserts or rain forrests? Will northern states turn into vast areas of greenery? Again - clueless - but as an engineer, I like to understand things. That is why, to me, it is frustrating. Very complicated, and also, compelling info on both sides. I lean toward the green side, however, simply because of the end result. What if it is all wrong? What if it is not happening and we do all this stuff to clean up the environment? Well, we still cleaned up the environment....
      JakeY
      • 3 Years Ago
      @Alfonso T. Alvarez According to that pdf file the Camry and Accord are both at 80%, so his numbers are actually right. Only the Avenger and 200 are higher for sedans (83% and 81% respectively). The others are minivans or SUVs.
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