Ford has just landed a solid punch in the battle to win over police departments in the post-Crown Vic era. The automaker announced the sale of 500 new Police Interceptor models (a mix of sedans and SUVs) to the Chicago Police Department. The 2013 Interceptor is responsible for the addition of 230 jobs at the Torrence Avenue plant, which is conveniently located in Chicago.

Okay, so the location of the plant likely made the CPD's vehicle of choice a foregone conclusion, but the latest PI models may also help the department in terms of its fuel expenditures. With an expected fuel economy gain of 25 percent compared to the now-defunct Crown Victoria, and gas prices expected to get much uglier than they already are, the more efficient Interceptor's arrival is nothing if not timely.

Some municipalities worry that the new Police Interceptors won't match the old Panther-platform cars' toughness when it comes to handling the rigors of police use, but Ford counters that its new PI models, a Taurus-based sedan and Explorer-based utility variant, are designed specifically for police work.

The automaker worked with the LAPD and and Michigan State Police to certify the the new vehicles for patrol duty. Departments can choose from a normally aspirated 263-horsepower 3.5-liter V6 or the turbocharged EcoBoost 3.5 with 365 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque.

Hit the jump to read over the Ford press release.
Show full PR text
City of Chicago Places Order for 500 Next-Generation Ford Police Interceptors
  • The city of Chicago will buy 500 Ford Police Interceptor sedans and utility vehicles, the largest commitment to date for the all-new vehicle
  • Production of Police Interceptors added 230 jobs at the Torrence Avenue plant; additional manufacturing and support jobs are expected
  • Ford's all-new, purpose-built Police Interceptor began rolling off the line at Chicago Assembly in January, building on 15 years of leadership in law enforcement vehicles
  • Ford's Police Interceptor vehicles can save law enforcement agencies across the country millions of dollars a year in fuel costs
DEARBORN, Mich., Feb. 24, 2012 – Ford is off to a strong start as the next-generation vehicle of choice by law enforcement agencies across the country.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced today the city will buy 500 Police Interceptor sedans and utility vehicles, the largest commitment to date for the all-new vehicles.

"We are pleased and proud Chicago has decided to purchase Ford's Police Interceptor vehicles," said Ken Czubay, vice president of Marketing, Sales and Service. "Ford has been the police pursuit vehicle market leader for 15 years, and we know these all-new vehicles can handle the rigors of police work."

The Police Interceptor sedan and utility vehicles started production at the company's Chicago Assembly Plant last month, adding 230 jobs at the Torrence Avenue plant with additional manufacturing and support jobs expected in the future.

Ford specially designed and engineered an all-new Police Interceptor sedan and utility to handle the rigors of police work, working hand-in-hand with its Police Advisory Board of law enforcement professionals.

Big cost savings
Ford's all-new Police Interceptor vehicles can save law enforcement agencies across the country millions of dollars a year in fuel costs. For example, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department – the largest in the world – operates a fleet of 6,200 vehicles that patrol an area the size of Connecticut. In 2010, those vehicles drove more than 27 million miles. A fleet-wide 20 percent fuel economy gain would stand to save the department at least $20 million a year with fuel prices hovering near $4 a gallon.

Increased power, enhanced sophistication
Ford's Police Interceptor engine strategy provides a V6 lineup that performs equal to or better than V8 engines. The lineup comes with two powertrain options, allowing police to choose the powerhouse that best meets their patrol requirements.

A highly efficient 3.5-liter V6 engine delivering at least 263 horsepower and E85 compatibility is 25 percent more efficient than the outgoing 4.6-liter single-overhead-cam V8 it is replacing.

In addition, the all-new 3.5-liter EcoBoost® V6 twin-turbocharged, direct-injection engine will deliver at least 365 horsepower and 350 lb.-ft. of torque across a broad rpm range. EcoBoost brings the first ultra-high-performance yet environmentally friendly police pursuit vehicle. The engine offers performance that bests normally aspirated V8-powered police cruisers, and comparable fuel economy and CO2 emissions to the standard V6.

Rigorously tested, police-tuned
Throughout its development, Ford's new Police Interceptor has been put through the paces, undergoing a battery of torture tests to ensure its individual components can hold up to the rigorous driving styles of police professionals.

Certification testing designed by the Michigan State Police and Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department evaluates the durability and capability of the vehicle through a variety of tests where its systems are pushed to the limits for nearly an hour and a half – far exceeding the demands most patrol cars ever experience.

To meet the rigors of the durability testing, the brakes have been increased in size and performance. The cooling package is purpose-built as well, featuring a heavy-duty alternator and larger radiator. Its honeycomb grille is designed to work in harmony with the interior components, offering more airflow throughout. Plus, the standard 18-inch steel wheels are vented, designed to work in concert with the enhanced brake system.

Functional, inside and out
Front seats have been specially designed, with a lower bolster removed to better accommodate officers' utility belts. Inserted into the seatback are anti-stab plates, designed to protect front-seat occupants.

The Police Interceptor second row also has been optimized to address police-specific needs. The vinyl seats are specially sculpted and set back to improve second-row space and maximize legroom. The back door hinges are modified to open up another 10 degrees versus traditional rear doors.

The Ford Police Interceptor also is equipped with a column shift specially designed so the console area is free for the ever-increasing amounts of aftermarket police equipment necessary for officers to do their jobs. The new vehicle also features:

BLIS® (Blind Spot Information System): The system uses two radar sensors in the rear quarter panels to detect vehicles in surrounding lanes. If a vehicle enters the driver's blind-spot zones, the system alerts the driver with a warning light in the sideview mirror
Cross-traffic alert: This system uses the existing BLIS radar modules to sense oncoming traffic when slowly backing out of a parking spot. This industry-exclusive system functions only while the vehicle is in reverse and warns when cross-traffic appears within three car-widths
Rear view camera: When the vehicle is in rear camera mode, a color image with guidance markers on the rearview mirror will assist the driver in backing up
Reverse Sensing System: An audible tone will alert the driver to certain objects up to
6 feet behind the vehicle

Standard AdvanceTrac® ESC (electronic stability control): This helps maintain the intended path by measuring side-to-side yaw, or skidding, by the vehicle's speed, throttle position and steering wheel angle. When wheel slip is sensed, AdvanceTrac reduces engine torque and applies selected brakes

Ford SYNC®: The Ford-exclusive, hands-free information system has the potential to be customized and remapped to work specifically with police aftermarket equipment such as lights and sirens, allowing officers to focus on the task at hand


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 50 Comments
      willyk52
      • 2 Years Ago
      The preference for the CVPI wasnt JUST that it was tough but that it shared major parts for years... and years. The Panther platform was first used for the 'square' LTD/CV 1979, with a major revision only 13 years later in 1992. The 1992 the 4.6 motor that was used for the next 20 years. 1992 also introduced the rounded styling that was refreshed only 6 years later in 1998. Thew 1998 styling was unchanged for the next 13 years. There were some chassis improvements in 1998 and then a major frame and suspension update in 2003. The car was unchanged from 2003 through 2011. Los Angeles Police department had a reputation for "Frankencars", piecing together cars from parts from out of service cars. THAT is a BIG reason PDs like the CV. The mechanics knew how to service and repair, there was a small inventory of brake pads, oil filters etc etc. and officers could get in a different car with cars no surprises. I would expect teh current crop of police contenders will not have the design longevity of the CVPI.
        merlot066
        • 2 Years Ago
        @willyk52
        Did you miss all the articles (including this one) where they are referred to by their actual name? They are called the Police Interceptor and Police Interceptor Utility.
          Daniel D
          • 2 Years Ago
          @merlot066
          The only car called an interceptor is an Australian Ford XB Falcon Coupe drive by Mad Max. Everything else is a pale copy.
          merlot066
          • 2 Years Ago
          @merlot066
          Sorry, meant for the guy below...
      fat kid
      • 2 Years Ago
      IMO, Explorer doesn't look good in Police colors. Taurus looks great though.
      Ralph
      • 2 Years Ago
      They should have had prisoners evaluate the rear seat comfort, since they are the ones who will be sitting back there.
      alexkoolur
      • 2 Years Ago
      Who cares how many jobs are "created" by this order. This is Obamanomics talking point, to somehow validate govt spending as not a "cost" to the tax payer, but rather a job creator ....its such a joke. Maybe if we simply call an Apple a balloon it will no longer be an Apple. Wake up America
        Matt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @alexkoolur
        Who cares how many jobs were created? I mean, if they need police cars, they need them. Creating jobs is positive side effect. Get your political crap out of here, you sound like an ignorant idiot.
        untitledfolder
        • 2 Years Ago
        @alexkoolur
        Internet rule #45582: If someone ends a diatribe with "wake up X" where X is the party the comment is attempting to influence, you may disregard said comment. Exhibit A: Alexkoolur, autoblog politician
        RGT881
        • 2 Years Ago
        @alexkoolur
        Completely agree Alex. I had EXACTLY the same reaction when I read this. It's got nothing to do with politics (as Huffington Post lovers would file this under), but sheer fact that Chicago is so completely broke that it defies all logic for this order to occur! How much does each model cost? I'm sure it's more expensive than the CV. So yes okay these cars may consume less gas, but what is it going to cost to maintain and repair them? Yes jobs are created, but the multiplier effect, I doubt will yield more $ per $ spent. And yes of course government is spending money and its acquiring its funds through taxes, inflation tax and borrowing on shorter end. It's funny - the whole country is sitting on an Adjustable Rate Mortgage.
          mbmorrow4
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RGT881
          Replacing police cars is simply a fact of life. The Crown Vic is dead. Ford did have the foresight to engineer the new PI to accept the Crown Vic divider and many of the police specific accessories which keeps the cost of the switch over down. The Chargers have been dismal performers in the field and expensive to maintain. The Caprice is an import and expensive. The PI will be Ford's Police Car. I have little reason to doubt the effort they put in to staying No. 1.
          alexkoolur
          • 2 Years Ago
          @RGT881
          Exactly. So sick of "debt" being reported as an economic stimulant because it requires short term labor to support it. Police departments wouldn't be broke if 80% of their labor force wasn't retiring on "disability" pensions after 20 years. I applaud what cops do, but they are just another example of unions run amuck with an entitlement mentality as if the $ to fund their demands is limitless . And then they will argue that if you are against their demands you are against "hard working middle class families ", as if the tax payer who is funding this isn't hard working and simply is tired of being over taxed
      truckguy
      • 2 Years Ago
      That JUNK !!!!!!!!!!!!! I'm sooooory but I just spent the day looking for a small SUV and saw the crash rating on the escape. I know they just changed the crash test, but i think they should have stopped making or fixed them as they did Ford on the F150 and Dodge1500.
        OnTheRocks
        • 2 Years Ago
        @truckguy
        I'm still wondering what this comment has to do with the Ford Interceptors.
        Dean
        • 2 Years Ago
        @truckguy
        I'm curious how you came to this conclusion. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the current Taurus, Explorer, Edge, and Escape, all earned 'Good' ratings. As IIHS is an independent, non-government organization, they have no bias towards any automaker (which should make a lot of you conspiracy theorist, anti-government types happy). In offset-front, and side-impact crash tests, all the mentioned vehicles performed well. They may have deformed in the crash, but that deformation absorbed the crash force, and preserved the passenger compartments, thus actually allowing the occupants to walk away safely. I don't know what more you're looking for.
        Elmo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @truckguy
        You keep coming up with these "crash ratings" that have absolutely nothing to back up those statements.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        frost54661
        • 2 Years Ago
        1. Regular unleaded is acceptable for the EcoBoost 3.5L. Your speaking of MAX power, which even running regular unleaded this thing blows the Tahoe and Crown Vic into the weeds. 2. For 2013 the brake package has been updated on the SHO cars, and the police units use specific pads, rotors, wheels, and fascias to help shed the heat.
        Elmo
        • 2 Years Ago
        Do you seriously have to use profanity in every one of your comments?
      montegod7ss
      • 2 Years Ago
      This goes against everything I've heard from the agencies I deal with at work, but me being out of touch with Chicago is something I pride myself in. All of the ones I deal with are waiting patiently for Caprice production to get ramped up, because they love RWD, love V8s, and still remember the big body Caprice of the '80s and '90s.
        yo202
        • 2 Years Ago
        @montegod7ss
        .. and then they will wake up and realize a v8 is no longer needed with today's technology that is pushing v6's far beyond what the v8's did just four years ago. And once you've driven a AWD car you'll never want anything else. The caprice will be great also, but let's please calm the F*** down about the RWD argument ! It doesn't mean squat except that campus police wont be doing too many more burnouts in the parking lots..
          That Kid
          • 2 Years Ago
          @yo202
          While I agree with you mostly, I do feel like FWD/ FWD-based cars are usually considerably more delicate, particularly when it comes to the strength of the front-end suspension. Though this hardly makes as much of a difference as the switch from BOF to unibody, I should think...
          jtav2002
          • 2 Years Ago
          @yo202
          Does the HP really make that much of a difference? If they're coming from the CV, those weren't exactly fast. I HIGHLY doubt if it comes down between a department getting V6 Caprices and V6 NA Taurus' that the decision will be based on what car has 40hp more. If HP was the main concern all departments would all have new Chargers which unless they're rated less than their Civilian counterparts offer more V8 hp and 300+ hp in V6 guise as well. Plus the statement of who is purchasing the cars doesn't hold true straight across for every single police department.
          Jason Alan Sipes
          • 2 Years Ago
          @yo202
          During Track Testing the new Taurus police car was the fastest on track and it is the only new police car that is rated for 75+ mph rear collisions, like the out going Crown Vic was.
          montegod7ss
          • 2 Years Ago
          @yo202
          GM also has a V6 in the Caprice, with 40hp more than the Taurus. I guess 40hp doesn't matter for armchair quarterbacks such as yourself. Clearly you are in no way associated with anything law enforcement if you think the desire for RWD can just be brushed aside. Also, Police departments don't buy these cars, purchasing departments and Fleet departments do. Purchasing departments submit bids to vendors and a winner is selected from that. Fleet departments pick what is easiest to work on, and years and years and years of working on V8 and V6 RWD sedans has their whole shops setup that way. I am sure you knew that too, since you are full of so much other factual information.
          • 2 Years Ago
          @yo202
          [blocked]
          Aaron Koehne
          • 2 Years Ago
          @yo202
          well it's nice to know that there are plenty of drive-train options that will meet any dept. needs
      truckguy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dean then why waist the ink don't put it on the window sicker. I am buying a Chevy in the morning.
        Dean
        • 2 Years Ago
        @truckguy
        Your Chevy will also deform in a crash, absorbing the crash impact, and transferring forces around the passenger compartment, which in turn, will keep you safe. To my knowledge, just about every new car on the market does this to (sadly) keep people like you safe.
      OnTheRocks
      • 2 Years Ago
      "But my rear wheel drive! :(" -typical a-hole comment.
      Marlin Mosley
      • 2 Years Ago
      If FORD can answer the demands of Police depts. across the country with these new made in Chicago's Torrance plant cruisers, it would be quite a boost to the local ecomony. As orders pour in the 230 jobs created by the demand for these new ecomocial law enforcement vehicles will have a positive effect across the board and hopefully bring back some prospeity to skilled (and unskilled) out of work indivuals...(HOPE for the FUTURE)
      Classic_Engr
      • 2 Years Ago
      Elwood: "Yeah. Its got cop shocks, cop tires, cop brakes, cop engine, and the engine was designed pre catalitic converters so it will run ok on regular. So, what do you say ... is it the new Blues mobile?" Jake: "Fix the lighter."
      Cool people
      • 2 Years Ago
      For the premium $$$ Taurus & Explorer owners paid they deserve a Drastic fascia /name change so their investment is not diminished by the cop version. Fleet mileage vehicles also lower resell values for the model. Think FoMo.
        Jason Alan Sipes
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Cool people
        Apparently, you've never been in a police car, I used to service them. They are nothing like the civilian versions, the only similarities end at the exterior.
        frost54661
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Cool people
        Interiors, powertrains, fascias, headlights, tail-lights ARE different on the police units.
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