Nissan is looking to sell as many as 2,000 DC quick-charging stations within the next two years, as the Japanese automaker looks to boost sales of its all-electric Leaf by providing owners an opportunity to almost completely recharge the car in a half hour, Green Car Reports reported, citing an interview with Nissan North America spokesman Brendan Jones.

Nissan is planning to distribute more than 800 "Level 3" stations, which are based on the CHAdeMO protocol and operate at 480 volts, within the next couple of months, and is planning to sell more than 1,000 by year end, the website said, citing Jones. Nissan may work out an agreement in which its distribution partners would temporarily offer free charging. Many of the charging stations, which can recharge 80 percent of a Leaf's battery in as little as 30 minutes, will likely be located in urban areas as well as along well-traveled highways like California's Interstate 5, according to the website.

The automaker made news last fall by saying it would offer quick charging stations for as little as $9,900, or about half the price of the Leaf's prior quick-charging station. Nissan, which developed its Level 3 charger with Sumitomo, said last September that it planned to sell 5,000 of the compact quick chargers by March 2016 as part of its efforts to accelerate Japan's charging infrastructure.

Automotive and technology analysts view quick chargers as more likely to be acquired by public entities and businesses, as opposed to private residences, because of their high power requirements and price tag. Such devices can charge a Nissan Leaf from halfway "full" to almost completely charged in about the same time it takes to fill a tank of gas.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 82 Comments
      • 1 Day Ago
      I think the SAE/ IEC combo standard will win in the end (Tesla's connector is very, very likely to support it with an adapter because the two is electrically compatible, the signaling is very similar, and Tesla has played a big role in it's development). CHAdeMO is not as good technically (less power, large footprint despite being DC only, way too many signal pins). However, at the same time, I agree with Nissan's decision to move forward with CHAdeMO to address the needs of the current Leaf owners. Similarly, Tesla has developed their own connector to address the needs for Model S owners. SAE is too slow (Nissan is saying so here, I've heard a Tesla engineer who worked with SAE on the DC standard and developed the current Tesla connector say the same).
        • 1 Day Ago
        Now that Tesla has CHAdeMO adapter (but not CCS/Combo adapter), it's yet another sign that Combo/CCS is dead on arrival. I highly doubt no amount of time will do combo any favor - the market will continue to be split between Tesla SC and CHAdeMO for lower ends. ANother case in point: Mitsubishi Outlander SUV will be CHAdeMO only, no CCS. All news coming out in 2014 tells CCS/Combo will never make it.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Day Ago
      Joeviocoe is correct regarding a continuing need for standardization of hydrogen fueling equipment. Building and safety codes are also being worked out for hydrogen stations; both of these are a factor in why the current hydrogen infrastructure isn't being built out quickly, and contradicts the claims that such delays represent a lack of interest on the part of potential hydrogen providers. Hydrogen dispensation codes and standards are being developed to coincide with the commercial introduction of FCVs, and the station network will grow over time along with the FCV population, according to plans and frameworks agreed upon by the makers, the fuel providers, and the regulating government authorities. http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/pdfs/progress11/viii_6_rivkin_2011.pdf
      DarylMc
      • 1 Day Ago
      That's a very speedy charge and I can imagine some sort of future breakdown vehicle throwing in a few km of range quicksmart. Someone is bound to try a transcontinental trip but EV's aren't really the right vehicle for it. I wonder how many cars in the queue before you find a regular outlet and book a room for the night. Topping up for 10-15 minutes may well do the trick for many heavy use city applications but I don't think people should kid themselves and think that there will ever be this level of power in everyone's home garage.
        Nick
        • 1 Day Ago
        @DarylMc
        I've never seen a "plug in station", but parking spaces with the charging units between parking spots. It's not meant for you to hang out there for 30 minutes, but it's intended to charge while you're walking around town anyway.
          DarylMc
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick
          Honestly I am not really sure how fast chargers are set up in public places and I wonder how it would work. Can someone just park beside, unplug your vehicle and plug in theirs instead on your credit? Or would it be acceptable to wait and unplug their car without their permission once it had finished? Maybe some people would find it pleasant to have the AC running the whole time they were shopping but a full charge when they return. Or maybe a valet system makes more sense. Perhaps some sort of electronic laching for the plug? People who don't like EV's are going to have ammunition for years to come.
          DarylMc
          • 1 Day Ago
          @Nick
          Hi Nick Thats a good point. You may need to wait a lot longer than 30 min if there is just one car parked up there.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 1 Day Ago
      they should have done that long ago and at a much lower price. you're missing too many opportunities Ghosn. weight, aerodynamics, performance, price. if you want to beat the others you have to actually beat them, not heartless hesitation betting on overpriced ugly product.
        reconfreya
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Dan "eco dork" Frederiksen, ladies and gentlemen. Perfected the art of getting voted down like nobody else. Glad at least he doesn't still use his ugly profile photo. LOL!
        DarylMc
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        I'm wondering if that was sarcasm and Dan just forgot to add a smiley. On all the points mentioned Nissan seems to have done quite well. Surely there is no need to list all the stats compared to Dan's Audi EV:) I doubt anyone would look at the styling and think wow but giving it some peculiarity may well prove to be a clever choice.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DarylMc
          I am quite serious. and I am obviously right as well. curious that it resulted in that negative feedback. good thing truth isn't a democracy but unfortunate for humanity that so many have such poor judgment. ah well, maybe nissan staff reads ABG : )
      • 1 Day Ago
      1. EVs make the most sense in developed areas, where travel will not need exceed range. 2. Many people in developed areas -- renters, apartment dwellers, many condo owners, etc. -- do not have regular places to park and/or do not have the capability to install their own charging stations. 3. Fast charging in developed areas will be the key to EV adoption by enabling EV ownership even if those owners do not have a regular place to park and/or do not have the capability to install their own charging stations.
        Nick
        • 1 Day Ago
        "EV ownership even if those owners do not have a regular place to park and/or do not have the capability to install their own charging stations." --> UNLESS you own an "extended range" hybrid such as the Volt. Then you could just re-charge it in 5-10 min (same time as filling up with gas), or simply charge it at work (assuming there's a charger).
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        If you haven't got access to a charging point, forget buying an EV. Fast charge is fine for occasional use, not for running your car. These stations are not cheap, so numbers won't go through the roof anytime soon. There are around 800 people per petrol pump, but topping up only takes 5 minutes. Everyone is going to want to charge at similar times if they can't charge at home, on the way into and from work. How is that going to work? Are you going to wait 30 minutes for the guy before you to charge, then charge your own car for 30 minutes, then set off to work? You need easy access to a plug if you want a plug in car.
      EZEE
      • 1 Day Ago
      I saw my second leaf the other day. Parked in front of a Starbucks. Oddly, had seen a volt there too. Definitely odder up close than in pictures. The headlights actually bug out of the hood in an odd way, and the back end is pretty trippy as well. That said, it just looks like a normal car, except odd. Nothing that screams electric or anything like that. Hey ABG! Look at Dan's comment on the bottom. A good article might be why these cars are expensive (break down costs vs, ICE cars), weight versus safety...etc. there are probably reasonable explanations, but I think it would be nice to hear them.
        EZEE
        • 1 Day Ago
        @EZEE
        Seeing a leaf gets downvoted but a Neil Cavuto comment up voted? I just don't know what to believe in anymore!
          DarylMc
          • 1 Day Ago
          @EZEE
          EZEE I've had awful results clicking on the thumb thingy. Maybe it's a Southern Hemisphere thing but sometimes I click on a thumbs up and see a minus get added so I hardly bother anymore.
        EZEE
        • 1 Day Ago
        @EZEE
        Seeing a leaf gets downvoted but a Neil Cavuto comment up voted? I just don't know what to believe in anymore!
      Spec
      • 1 Day Ago
      Who is going to buy these? Just wait until the SAE standard is released and then get fast-charge boxes that do both ChadeMO and SAE level-3 charging. I know Japan wants to push their standard as the de facto standard but I would rather have an industry-agreed upon standard.
        skierpage
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        It's kind of odd in this standards battle to pay any attention to all the people and manufacturers who DON'T have a car with DC fast charging. It's like VHS saying "Ours is better, everyone should have a slot for our tapes" before a single VHS VCR is out there. Has any charging station manufacturer announced a DC fast charge station supporting SAE J1772 DC fast charge or Tesla SuperCharger, let alone more than one standard? I looked a month ago and couldn't find anything.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        No point waiting for the 'American' companies to stitch up a standard, to the detriment of those building in Tennessee. The committees setting the standards in the US are just as likely to be packed with opponents of EV's as advocates anyway, and to decide to simply drag out the process or introduce dumb ones. Here is what Nissan says: 'Mr. Jones said Nissan could not wait for the SAE standard to be commercialized before bringing the low-price charger to market. “We have 8,500 Leaf customers, a big majority with fast-charging capability, and they need to be supported today,” he said. It could be several years before cars equipped with the SAE standard were on the road, he said.' http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/11/nissan-to-market-d-c-fast-charger-for-under-10000/
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          The SAE standard is harmonized with the IEC 62196-3 (the two sockets take up the same footprint and the signaling is the same). I expect it to overtake CHAdeMO eventually because there are many more automakers backing it and it's a better standard IMHO (more power, similar footprint despite backwards compatibility to J1772-2009, less pins for signaling) However, it has taken too long, to the point even Tesla decided not to wait for it and designed their own connector (although their connector is likely electrically compatible with the standard; CHAdeMO is completely incompatible).
          miles
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          DaveMart: "I probably don't understand how the different committees interact, but had not got a great impression from the coincidences in the wider regulation and control in the US, such as subsidies 'coincidentally' maximising at the 16kwh the Volt has." Here you seem to be implying that the SAE has influence on subsidies - am I reading that right? I assure you the subsidies are not impacted by the SAE at all - that's just politicians rigging the game for the home team, as happens all over the world...
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          I'm perfectly willing to be corrected on the point. I probably don't understand how the different committees interact, but had not got a great impression from the coincidences in the wider regulation and control in the US, such as subsidies 'coincidentally' maximising at the 16kwh the Volt has. However I freely admit that this is an impression, not the result of detailed knowledge of the process setting standard in the US. Certainly in Europe it is highly political and I had thought the same applied in the States.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          "No point waiting for the 'American' companies to stitch up a standard, to the detriment of those building in Tennessee." Just to clarify, and I'm sure you are aware - the Society of Automotive Engineers is an international standards organization. http://www.sae.org/about/board/vision.htm "The committees setting the standards in the US are just as likely to be packed with opponents of EV's as advocates anyway..." I'm sorry you feel that standards are not developed in good faith. http://standards.sae.org/j1772_201001/
        EV Now
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        @Spec Who cares about SAE "standard". Their whole idea is to delay EV adoption. We only hear about SAE "standard" - not a word on any EVs by those auto manufacturers which would use those "standards".
          Spec
          • 1 Day Ago
          @EV Now
          What is with this 'delay' conspiracy theory? Are they slow-moving bureaucratic entity? YES! But it is not some conspiracy to slow EVs. If that was the plan, they never would have released the level-1 and level-2 J17772 charger. GM, BMW, Daimler AG, Ford, and Volkswagen all plan to use SAE Level 3. (Brands included by Daimler are Mercedes-Benz and Smart, and, the VW umbrella covers Porsche and Audi.) http://gm-volt.com/2011/10/14/gm-and-other-automakers-agree-on-proposed-level-iii-charging-standard/
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        Let's see, both Nissan and Mitsubishi who are the guys actually building BEVs in volume use ChadeMO, the Volt doesn't need it as it can just burn petrol and the Spark from GM is only planned to have a run of a couple of thousand. The only pure BEVs from Ford are the Focus which is OK for those who don't need a boot and the laughably overpriced Connect. What is the matter with allowing those who are actually producing BEVs in volume to set the standard? SAE is a delaying tactic.
          DaveMart
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          'Production is set to around 2000 units per year, with a majority of them being reserved for sale in certain regions such as California.' http://www.caradvice.com.au/141413/2013-chevrolet-spark-ev-to-debut-next-year/
          Spec
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          Where is there anything saying the Spark will just be a couple thousand? Do you think it would be OK if the ChadeMO people got a de facto standard going and then decided to charge every other automaker a $1000/car fee to use ChadeMO? I'd rather avoid that possibility. You know who created ChadeMO? TEPCO. Yes, the TEPCO of Fukushima fame. Do you think they might want to do anything to raise cash these days? I don't want to find out. Go with a standard approved by an international organization like SAE where they will make sure everyone will be treated equally.
        Michael Walsh
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        Nobody wants the SAE standard. Except maybe GM....and don't you have to wonder why.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Spec
        I'd rather they got on with it. Waiting for standards to go through committee in the US where opponents of any sort of EV are likely to have as big an influence as proponents, and where the US car companies will be able to twist the standards to the disadvantage of Japanese manufacturers, or even ones producing in Tennessee is not a viable strategy IMO. Here is Nissan's comment: 'Mr. Jones said Nissan could not wait for the SAE standard to be commercialized before bringing the low-price charger to market. “We have 8,500 Leaf customers, a big majority with fast-charging capability, and they need to be supported today,” he said. It could be several years before cars equipped with the SAE standard were on the road, he said.' http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/11/nissan-to-market-d-c-fast-charger-for-under-10000/
          Michael Walsh
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          "“We have 8,500 Leaf customers, a big majority with fast-charging capability, and they need to be supported today,” he said. It could be several years before cars equipped with the SAE standard were on the road, he said." That must be an old quote - Nissan was at 10,000 customers in the US as of the second week in January.
          Spec
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          The SAE standard is scheduled to come out very soon. Within weeks. I understand Nissan going forward since they have cars to support . . . I asked who will *buy* these. Others should be less willing to support a proprietary de facto standard. And I suggested that they get chargers that support SAE level 3 AND ChadeMO.
      Roy_H
      • 1 Day Ago
      I would normally champion SAE because it is a better thought out system. But SAE has been taking years to develop their standards, and is now trying to get agreement by as many countries and major automakers as possible. Everyone has their own pet capability they want included. So this design by committee becomes a kludge trying to satisfy everyone. This is why it is a big connector with two pairs of pins, one pair for AC and the other for DC (and a lot of space between presumably for safety). Tesla's approach is much more logical. They use the SAE protocol, but only 2 pins for power. The same pins can be used for AC or DC. CHAdemo uses many small pins for communications, SAE only 2 robust pins. SAE has 2 pins for communications, 2 each for AC and DC and a ground pin for a total of 7 pins. Tesla does not have a ground so only has 4 pins. CHAdemo has 8 (I think) pins for communications 2 for DC and no ground. I would like to see the Tesla version modified with a 3rd power pin to make it compatible with 3 ph AC. This would go over big in Europe as 220VAC 3ph is common over there. However, I think CHAdemo will win out (the worst system) just because they are actively pushing it. SAE just takes too long, and Tesla is not a big enough player to make their standard world wide acceptable.
        Rotation
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Roy_H
        I agree it's weird Tesla requires the external charger have conversion capabilities if 3 phase is to be used properly.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Roy_H
        I think a lot of time and energy can be spent trying to stay ahead of a swift moving system. I can't even remember the details now, but years ago there was a lot of talk about 'future proofing' computers, so some of us tried to do so by specifying expensive busses and so on on our gear. Half the standards never caught on, and the future proof stuff was never quite present-time proof. The point I am making is that this is early days, that if they come to use very big battery packs, perhaps resistant to very fast charges, then nothing which we are specifying now is likely to do the job, and a clean new design would likely be needed. The main expense of such a system anyway is not in the chargers, but in the upgrades to cabling to them, transformers, perhaps stationary battery backing banks. In any case, all this assumes that some sort of range extended system does not end up winning the race, in which case the fast chargers will be a minor player or non-existent. If, OTOH, large batteries are the answer, then even if around 50kw was going to help them much, which is doubtful, then you would be talking about many thousands of them, so many in fact that replacing these couple of thousand ChadeMO spec chargers would be neither here nor there in reality. I think Ghosn is doing exactly the same as he did with battery technology, where he said the engineers would always want one more generation to bring them to market. He went ahead anyway, and if electric cars catch on and current batteries don't last as long as they had hoped, making some early replacements is not that big a deal in the big picture. It is the same with ChadeMO, it may not be ideal, but it will do the job. If a few years down the line a couple of thousand of them need replacing, so what? They will have already helped electric cars to become a practical and widespread reality.
      marcopolo
      • 1 Day Ago
      The problem of standardised charging is very vexing ! Charging requirements differ from region to region. Seventeen years ago, when I started to look at specialist EV's as a business, the idea of public charging infrastructure (like EV's) was considered a mad idea, believed only by readers of 'Popular Science' ! Since then we have concentrated on vehicles whose batteries were receptive to three-phase power (available at the location of use), and the 220-40 volt outlets common outside the US. The advent of better quality Lithium + battery technology has produced longer range vehicles, requiring faster charging. The development and potential popularity of EREVs like GM's Volt, has produced a new dynamic as to what sort of charging facilities will eventually be needed. I can understand Nissan's eagerness to create a network designed to favour Nissan technology. Tesla vehicles are designed with a different philosophy, and the concept of the capacity of EV's is changing very quickly. Likewise, charging infrastructure will also evolve, and standardise, as more EV's appear. Many of these EV's will have different needs and aspirations. EV development is happing very quickly, and should be allowed to evolve naturally, without too many restrictions. Competition may seem a very wasteful approach, as one technology eventually renders rivals obsolete, but that's probably the best method to achieve the most innovative and practical result. Batteries themselves may become obsolete as energy storage devices, requiring even more radical charging systems. Until then, just be thankful that the argument is now about which type of recharging system is best, rather than if charging infrastructure is even worth while!
      • 1 Day Ago
      At least one of these fast chargers should be located at each of the 1100 Nissan dealers in the United States.
        DaveMart
        • 1 Day Ago
        A fast charger at a Nissan dealer adds little if any value to the business. A fast charger at a supermarket or fast food outlet etc does, and gives the driver something to do, and importantly something to spend his or her money on whilst the car is charging, so are more optimal. Mind you, if many of the cars the Nissan dealer sells and repairs are electric, presumably they would need some way of charging them up anyway.
          Ele Truk
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          It helps the dealer demonstrate fast charging. And Nissan dealerships have a nice distribution pattern, so they won't be too close together. And while the car is charging, they can chat with potential customers, which is far better than hearing from sales guys.
          Ele Truk
          • 1 Day Ago
          @DaveMart
          It helps the dealer demonstrate fast charging. And Nissan dealerships have a nice distribution pattern, so they won't be too close together. And while the car is charging, they can chat with potential customers, which is far better than hearing from sales guys.
        EZEE
        • 1 Day Ago
        That, is a good idea....
          EZEE
          • 1 Day Ago
          @EZEE
          reading below..... Here is why it is a good idea. It will be a sales too for Nissan. People nearby will want to come in more often and hang out. It will be a way to at least start having chargers out there, and will promote a product. Harley Davidson dealers are hangouts for people on the weekend. They have have food, bands....baoloons for kids. Great way to get people looking, talking, good will.....
      EZEE
      • 1 Day Ago
      One of these might save marriages, should one person forget to plug the car in overnight (hat tip Neil Cavuto)
      solas
      • 1 Day Ago
      Question: when's the last time you worried about the shape and size and pin count of your everyday household outlet? I certainly hope the answer is: never (or, for a few, almost never, and I don't mean when traveling). We just don't care. Even though I have already commented on ABG that the SAE Level 3 looks ugly ... a spec-done-on-after-thought-fumes. These are political/business posturing moves over ... a plug. There is no detrimental design to SAE level 3, or Tesla's (AFAIK), or CHAdemo. (meaning: they have reasonable plug-in-count life, heat handling, etc). I certainly hope CHAdemo wins, simply because it represents highest volume so far, and, well, I have a "free" CHADemo port, still waiting to be used, perhaps one day... It is quite shocking SAE is just now considering things like: "In an updated standard due in 2012, SAE proposes to use power line communication, specifically IEEE P1901, between the vehicle, off-board charging station, and the smart grid, without requiring an additional pin" The real truth is: we have a war of standards going on, but, unlike the good 'ol 'betamax' vs. 'vhs' wars ... the difference in quality/features/scope/"beauty"/cost(as a function of total vehicle or charger price)... does not justify the posturing. A plug is a plug. ... until politics takes hold...
        solas
        • 1 Day Ago
        @solas
        NO, the auto industry is not trying to come up with a standard: that is exactly the problem. The Tesla model S connector is not even compatible with Tesla's own roadster, for example. While the SAE is trying for a standard (and, as you point out with "bewildering array of plugs": look at the wonderful job they did, just in the US alone :-D ) ... they ignore precedence (CHAdeMo) ... or Nissan gave them a political "middle finger", doesn't matter. While no sane person would think two plugs are "better" than one compact plug (unless the compact plug has a serious compromise, which, as already posted, is not the case) ... the actual difference between these two is not even worth discussing. The last time I worried about the fact that I had two sockets was ... well, never. The Model S wants NO LINES, so they even hide the charger under the taillight. While that is impressive, it cannot be used to justify fragmenting the industry, from and objective standpoint. Same goes for CHAdeMo. Meaning: if the industry all got together, and "played nice" ... a "mediocre" compromise in this space, giving us one connector, is the best choice. Is that SAE? as others have posted ... so far, it is too little, too late.
        Roy_H
        • 1 Day Ago
        @solas
        Since when... I don't worry about it because it is a standard. OTOH there is a bewildering array of plugs for higher amperage/voltage. Different plugs for dryer and stove. Twist lock plugs with many pin variations for 20A, 25A, 30A 40A, 120V 240V single phase, 3 phase Y 3 phase delta. You have to choose the right one for the job. What the auto industry is doing is trying to come up with a standard so you don't have to worry about pulling up to a charger, and then finding out it doesn't fit your car. Right now the LEAF has two connectors, one for SAE level 1 and 2 and the other CHAdeMo for high power DC. Do you really believe these two plugs are just as good as or better than the one compact plug Tesla uses?
        electronx16
        • 1 Day Ago
        @solas
        I don't care about pins, it's the power behind the pins that interests me. 50KW CHadeMO's aren't adequate for fastcharging large batterypacks likeTesla uses (and which require about double that capacity)so they are obsolete before they are even rolled out. That's the real problem.
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