Volkswagen will start selling a plug-in hybrid-electric (PHEV) version of the Golf in 2015 and has estimated that the car will be able to go as far as 30 miles in electric-only mode, AutoExpress is reporting.

The Golf PHEV will likely pair a 1.4-liter turbocharged gas engine with a 107-horsepower electric motor. The German automaker will show off a Golf PHEV concept vehicle at the Paris Motor Show this September, the website reported. PlugInCars cites a review on the UK-based AutoExpress website saying that the prototype was "very impressive" in a test drive.

VW last July unveiled a station-wagon prototype of the Golf "Twin Drive" PHEV. That car paired a 1.4-liter gas engine with an electric motor that provided 161 horsepower as well as 35 miles of electric-only range and more than 550 miles of range on a full tank. VW, which estimated the prototype's fuel economy at 112 miles per gallon-equivalent, planned at the time to build 20 Golf Twin Drive vehicles for testing.

Last summer, VW CEO Martin Winterkorn said in an interview with Auto Motor und Sport that he thought plug-in hybrids would be embraced by consumers at a far faster rate than battery-electric vehicles that don't provide a gasoline-powered option.


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  • 28 Comments
      DRstrangelove
      • 2 Years Ago
      Day late, dollar short meh
      Ryan
      • 2 Years Ago
      That looks like a decent car. I like it. Let's see how fast and how many they can make.
      electronx16
      • 2 Years Ago
      So Winterkorn reckons the range extender will broaden market appeal. That's interesting because not too long ago the Volt was considered to be "a car for idiots" by another VAG executive because it wouldn't have any market appeal. Reason: too expensive. Fact is those plug-in hybrids have a huge part count and will therefore always be expensive to make. Come 2015 the plug-in Golf may find itself in the same price range as the new 180 mile Nissan Leaf and Tesla's upcoming mass market proposition. Maybe they should stick with the battery electric version and accept that it won't be all things to all people.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Years Ago
      and pigs will fly. I will stick with my VW 1L that I bought in 2010, thank you very much. and for family trips I'll use my electric Audi A1 fresh lies from germany
        DarylMc
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Hey Dan Here I was thinking you've been taking the medication. :) So you own a VW and an Audi but you don't like German manufacturers? Maybe you could supply a few more details. If the Up EV arrives in 2013 it may well be the size, weight and cost to allow mainstream adoption.
          DarylMc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          Ok It went right over my head :)
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DarylMc
          Daryl, neither of those cars ever arrived. it was sarcasm to demonstrate how they have a track record of lying. VAG is worse than GM before the shaming by who killed the electric car. GM is still super douchy, they just don't say it anymore. same with Ford.
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'll get in line to buy this. let GM and toyota be the first gen PHEVs and the german product will be superior. no reason to be the first out now. I'm guessing VW will get their hybrid system ironed out w/ the jetta next year and then bring on PHEV. I just HOPE that they don't stick with the jetta (sedan) for these drivetrains, the golf is much more functional.
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Golf is a far nicer size for parking and manoeuvring in crowded European cities, and 30 miles electric range is fine for covering city driving here. The otherwise excellent by the looks of it Ford Fusion hybrid would be a bit of a bus to get around our towns in, My guess would be that VW reckon that battery sizes will have shrunk enough by 2015 for them to be able to get it in without compromising accomodation too heavily as the Golf platform was not designed for this, unlike the Up which has had electric in mind from the first. People should not forget that the effort of the supposed greens in Germany mean that electricity costs a stonking 30 cents/kwh there, so the 30 miles of electric range will use up around $3 worth of electricity, which is cheaper than petrol but not by a huge margin. The same 30 miles charged off peak in France would cost maybe $0.80. No wonder German car makers have been less enthusiastic than some about electrification, as the home market is still important however international the company is.
        russellbgeister
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        i wonder what the idiots will be paying for there power when they close there nuc power plants lol
          marcopolo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @russellbgeister
          @Dave Mart Once again, I must thank you for an excellent, well reasoned, well researched post ! This is too good to be just a small post on ABG, it should be used as the basis for a mainstream media article! . Keep up the good work.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @russellbgeister
          'Germany once prided itself on being the “photovoltaic world champion”, doling out generous subsidies—totaling more than $130 billion, according to research from Germany’s Ruhr University—to citizens to invest in solar energy. But now the German government is vowing to cut the subsidies sooner than planned and to phase out support over the next five years. What went wrong? Subsidizing green technology is affordable only if it is done in tiny, tokenistic amounts. Using the government’s generous subsidies, Germans installed 7.5 gigawatts of photovoltaic capacity last year, more than double what the government had deemed “acceptable.” It is estimated that this increase alone will lead to a $260 hike in the average consumer’s annual power bill. According to Der Spiegel, even members of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s staff are now describing the policy as a massive money pit. Philipp Rösler, Germany’s minister of economics and technology, has called the spiraling solar subsidies a “threat to the economy.”' And: 'In the words of the German Association of Physicists, “solar energy cannot replace any additional power plants.” On short, overcast winter days, Germany’s 1.1 million solar-power systems can generate no electricity at all. The country is then forced to import considerable amounts of electricity from nuclear power plants in France and the Czech Republic. Indeed, despite the massive investment, solar power accounts for only about 0.3 percent of Germany’s total energy. This is one of the key reasons why Germans now pay the second-highest price for electricity in the developed world (exceeded only by Denmark, which aims to be the “world wind-energy champion”). Germans pay three times more than their American counterparts.' http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/project_syndicate/2012/02/why_germany_is_phasing_out_its_solar_power_subsidies_.html
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @russellbgeister
          Marco: Many thanks for your kind words. The article was hardly mine, however, and I have simply passed on the work of others.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nice to see VW start moving. A bit late to the game though.
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have been waiting for this car for a couple of years, but would really like to see it with a diesel engine. I have owned the VW Jetta TDI diesel for over 3 years and love it!!!
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow, start selling in 2015 (normally means at the end of the year) with no numbers mentioned - that' basically 4 years from now - are they just starting development? The German manufacturers just do not want vehicles to have plugs.
        skierpage
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Sasparilla Fizz
        See my other comment, 2015 sounds like an error from Plug-in Cars. VW unveiled their first Twin Drive plug-in hybrid prototype in 2008 and have fairly consistently claimed it will arrive in 2013. The pure-electric cars follow later, Popular Mechanics referred to the Blu E-Motion pure-electric Golf they drove as a 2014 model.
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Rumour has it that Renault may be able to up the range of the Zoe to 220 miles the year before VW manage this: http://www.thechargingpoint.com/news/2014-Renault-Zoe-pure-electric-car-could-have-220-mile-range.html If so, VW would seem to be rather behind the curve.
        electronx16
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        Sounds right since other rumours have it that partner Nissan will expand range to 180 miles by 2015: http://www.electric-vehiclenews.com/2009/11/nissan-long-range-battery-may-be-ready.html The key ingredient in those new batteries seems to be nickel, just like in Tesla's high energy density batteries.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          My comment vanished! The NMC lithium polymer from EST is not quite so dense but manages 123Wh/kg at the module level, which would push the Leaf which is about 80wh/kg up to an EPA range of 109 from 73 - but the kicker is their batteries are good for 5,000 cycles! http://www.estechnologies.nl/?Models
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          These guys at EST are doing a NMC battery using lithium polymer, 123wh/kg at the module level, good for 5,000 cycles! That might not be good for 200 miles, but it would lift the Leaf's EPA range of 73 miles to 109 miles. http://www.estechnologies.nl/?Models
          electronx16
          • 2 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          Interesting stuff, but I think Tesla is already at about 150wh/kg at the pack level and under the right conditions it's LiNiO2 chemistry could get 5000 cycles too: http://mtrl1.me.psu.edu/Document/ZhangY_JES_2009.pdf Of course that sort of cycle life is only useful if it has the calendar life to match since I reckon takes at least 15 years (and 1.5 million miles from an 85KWH batterypack!!) to get to that number. So more interesting than that sort of cyclelife is cost and nickle based chemistries seem to do great there too. Tesla's batteries retail at $400/KWH which would put cost between $200-300/KWH I reckon. At that cost 200 mile Leafs and Zoe's seem doable.
      skierpage
      • 2 Years Ago
      2015 would be a disaster, but nowhere in AutoExpress's review do they mention 2015! I don't know why Plug-in Cars refers to the *2013* VW Golf Mk VII as a 2015 car. Only 7 months ago VW's own own press release said: "One of the goals of Volkswagen AG is to launch numerous plug-in hybrid cars on the market in the years 2013/2014." Car and Driver's review of the *2013* Golf has another bullish (for a company that sells no plug-in cars right now) quote from Winterkorn, "VW is prepared to sell 300,000 electric vehicles per year by 2018."
      DaveMart
      • 2 Years Ago
      Price: 'According to VW, it expects the 2015 Golf VII Plug-in Hybrid to cost around the same as the new VW Golf GTi. ' Fuel Economy: 'Part of the key to its impressive fuel economy lies in the TSI engine, which can run on just one or two cylinders when power demands are low, allowing the VW Golf Plug-in Hybrid to run in a low-power mode if most of the power needs are met by its electric motor. ' http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1072832_2015-vw-golf-plug-in-hybrid-to-debut-at-2012-paris-motor-show Hopefully this might mean the 2015 model year, so the car might be available in late 2014. This is an interesting way of combining the range extender concept and a full-power motor. The current GTi seems to retail for around $24k and up in the US, so if VW can hit anywhere near that price they should sell them by the bucketload.
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