The Ford Focus Electric, which started sales in select east and west coast markets (read: California and New York/New Jersey) in November, won't be available to other U.S. markets until September, Ford Global Electric Vehicle Infrastructure associate director Mike Tinskey told MLive.

Tinskey, speaking after a panel discussion at the Automotive Megatrends USA 2012 conference in Ford's hometown of Dearborn earlier this month, said that the Focus Electric will be available to almost 80 percent of the country by this fall.

Ford, which hadn't set a deadline for when the Focus EV would debut outside of the coasts, started taking orders for the Focus Electric in November for initial market customers, and said at the time that it would expand sales to 15 other markets, including Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Seattle and Washington, D.C., by the end of 2012.

Ford, which has estimated that hybrids and plug-ins may account for as much as 25 percent of its vehicle sales by the end of the decade, has said that the Focus Electric has as much as a 100-mile single-charge range and estimated in December that the model will have a 100 miles-per-gallon-equivalent (MPGe) rating. That would make the Focus Electric the second-most "fuel efficient" production vehicle in the U.S. – Mitsubishi's battery-electric i has a 112 MPGe rating – and would put the Focus Electric's rating slightly ahead of the Nissan Leaf EVs' 99 MPGe rating.

Ford is starting pricing for the Focus Electric at $39,200, giving the car an out-of-pocket cost of as low as $31,700 once the $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicles is factored in and making it about $4,000 costlier than the Leaf.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      q3a7vodk4
      • 3 Years Ago
      I do not think you know what "out of pocket cost" means. Unless you were deliberately trying to be misleading.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's OK, I doubt demand will be heavy.
      marcopolo
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Ford Focus EV has a lot going for it! Respectable range, high quality fit-out, good looks, a 'real car' feel, ease of repair due to sharing components with standard focus, Ford brand. The disadvantages are obvious, small boot, electrified Focus conversion, relatively high price. These factors create the impression that this car should have been available 2-3 years earlier, when it would have been a runaway success. In comparison to the more versatile Volt, or radical Leaf, the Focus, seems a somewhat dated concept. Still, it's an solid start by Ford to catch up to rest of the field with Hybrid and EV technology.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @marcopolo
        It is dated. At least it is an improvement over most automakers though, with the "500 car 3 year lease, then crush" options we've been given for so long. I think it's the wrong approach and can't help but think of how they could do better. oh wait, i am kind of an ev designer.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @marcopolo
        They have made the wrong car into a BEV. The Maxi could have handled the batteries and still provided decent accomodation. Ford's hybrid efforts are much more impressive than their BEV moves, IMO.
          marcopolo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          @Dave Mart "Ford's hybrid efforts are much more impressive than their BEV moves," Dave, I'm not sure even Ford would disagree with that statement. But Ford is moving in the right direction, albeit cautiously.
      q3a7vodk4
      • 3 Years Ago
      From what people are reporting with the leaf and imiev, having the heater on and driving in the cold cuts your range in HALF.
      Sasparilla Fizz
      • 3 Years Ago
      So its really a 2013 car for the most part. I wonder how their orders are shaping up? Even with the looks that extra price, small trunk and no quick charger (for such a small range BEV) would be tough to swallow....beautiful though...
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 3 Years Ago
      Does this come with accelerationregen? I don't want to get divorced because I did not plug this vehicle in.
      DRstrangelove
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well DUH. Who cares bout the flyover states.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DRstrangelove
        "Well DUH. Who cares bout the flyover states." I do. I live in a flyover state. (Note that I had an East Coast style response queued up, but I suppressed it out of deference to the polite culture in which I now live -- that's one of the reasons I love living here.)
          Ziv
          • 3 Years Ago
          LOL! Too true. It is a different world in the fly over states. I miss a lot about it.
        marcopolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DRstrangelove
        @DRstrangelove The people who live there, and are thankful you dont?
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      1kWh less, but $4k more than the Leaf. Anyone want to bet that those 100 miles will also look more like 70 miles? Appears to have a notably stronger electric motor, 24kW more juice, so roughly 25% more power. In theory this car could seriously haul ass. But that price..
        MTN RANGER
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        FFE vs Leaf FFE + Half the time to charge, 6.6kW vs 3.3kW Liquid-cooled/heated battery pack vs air more standard features Better looking (subjective) FFE - Less trunk space much smaller due to battery Max speed 84 MPH vs 90-93 MPH Interior passenger smaller at 90.7 vs 98.3
          theflew
          • 3 Years Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          @2 Wheeled Menace , I keep hearing liquid cooling should not matter, but GM, Ford, Tesla thought that it was. I'm sure it's not because they wanted their cars to cost more than the competition.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 3 Years Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          theflew; it depends on whether your battery pack dictates the use of it or not. GM, Ford, and Tesla are drawing at, over, or near the maximum C rate of their batteries, which produces waste heat and voltage sag. That is why they need cooling. This is most certainly the case with the Volt and Tesla, not as bad with the Ford. You know why? it is is cheaper and uses less space to use the wrong battery for the job and add liquid cooling, than add more amp hours and/or chose a battery with lower internal resistance that would suit the job better. As much as i cheer Tesla on, their battery system is not one designed for longevity by any stretch of the word. Their packs, as well as the Volt's, will as Borat says.. 'hang loose like sleeve of wizard' within a few years after the purchase. So in summary, if you require an exotic cooling system for your battery, you have 0 headroom in your pack as far as internal resistance goes. That picture will get worse over time. I've seen some of my cells double in internal resistance in 1 year!! It is these compromises which bring EV cars to the market now - the battery picture continues to get better over time.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 3 Years Ago
          @MTN RANGER
          Great points, ranger. With a higher horsepower over the leaf, i wonder if the speed is electronically limited, or perhaps the Ford has designed the motor / differential for quicker acceleration than top speed. liquid cooled battery pack vs air.. should not matter.. this is a design choice. Ultimately no battery should require any kind of cooling as it will generate no waste heat .. I see how the charger is a plus. Interior room is a big downfall tho.
        BipDBo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        The Focus is simply a nicer car. The Leaf really does have the same feel of quality as the Versa. The standard ICE hatchback Focus has an MSRP of $18300. The Versa hatchback has an MSRP of $14480. The difference is $3820.
          EJ
          • 3 Years Ago
          @BipDBo
          Sorry, owning a Leaf and having rented many Versas, they are night and day.
          BipDBo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @BipDBo
          The interior on the Leaf is much nicer than that of the Versa. The seats and the quality of seat and ceiling liner cloth seemed about the exact same as the Versa, but the dash, instruments, door interiors, etc are much nicer. The Versa is my daily driver, and I was very underwheled with the difference between the Versa and Leaf in general. I was looking more at thing like the quality of the body panels apparent durability. To be honest, in these ways, the Versa seems more rugged and durable than the Leaf. The most important thing I was judgung for is the overall impression it gives when you ask the question, "What kind of car is this, economy, luxury, somewhere between?" The Leaf really seemed to me to be at home along with the Versa in the economy class, while the Focus (ICE atleast,because I've never seen the EV) and Volt really have the feel of at least 1 notch above economy.
          Aaron Gleason
          • 3 Years Ago
          @BipDBo
          I have to disagree with your statement "the same feel of quality as the Versa". I've driven both vehicles (Versa rental in Hawaii and a Leaf at a local drive event). The quality of the interior of the Leaf is VASTLY superior to the Versa. Example: The Versa had a huge injection-molding seam on its parking brake. The plastics looked cheap. The Leaf had a very nice interior with polished details and no visible seams. That being said, your point about the price difference is noted, however the electric Focus comes with all the options, like "fordinsight" said.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Good point about the power, I hadn't noticed that. Sad about the pack sizes - this thing comes with a 23 kWH pack. The Honda EV Plus from the 90's came with a 26 kWh NiMH pack way back then....ugh.
        Ford Future
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Sadly, it only comes loaded to the gills.
      Ziv
      • 3 Years Ago
      Unfortunately, the production FFE appears to come standard with half a boot, just like the prototype. Sure is a cool looking car, though. I like it in white, it looks like a visual "whoosh" symbol... LOL If Ford had priced it within a thousand dollars of the Leaf, it would have eaten Nissan's lunch.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ziv
        Well said. You are so right about the Leaf - if Ford actually had the production capacity to do that (a supplier of theirs Magna actually created the car and shopped it to Ford who they've sold it to, so they can't make many). Nissan better get the looks of the Leaf in a better situation by Generation 2, cause there will be good looking alternatives available in number by then.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow, not sure why that would cut the range in half. 1kW is a ton of heat for a small cabin, and the motor is capable of pushing out about 60kW on the smallest car, 100kW for the biggest electric car, so cruising watts will be around 3kW-10kW at low speeds, 1kW isn't that big of a dent! Half range is more likely due to lack of battery heating. All lithium batteries can have extreme internal resistance rises during the cold. You are probably referring to voltage sag which trips a BMS and the car says 'i'm outta power, sorry!'... definitely a first gen electric car problem, where the manufacturers were most likely handed this data on how the cells perform at various temps, but totally ignored it...
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      has any been delivered yet? I haven't seen any youtube videos about it I think. if deliveries started in november it was the most stealth launch ever.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I thought Ford would do better in the fly over states than Nissan. They tend to have a larger market share in those areas. So their marketing is kind of odd. It might just be to try and draw in the customers in those areas and not really worry about sales. They do not have a dedicated plant, so there is no need to really sell any of the cars.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I live in flyover country, and we have both a Ford a Nissan dealer on the same street -- and looking out at my work parking lot, I see a variety of vehicles and about 45%/45% domestic and Japanese. Most of the small vehicles are Japanese and most of the big vehicles are American (except for a Honda Ridgeline). Also, there are both Mitsubishi and Subaru auto plants within a two hour driving distance, and the plants contribute heavily to the local media and events. I'd say that whoever has the best car has the best chance out here in flyover country. Just like everyone else. That said, I currently own a Ford and am satisfied with their service, so that does work in their favor. Buy my wife likes the Prius V (she drives a 2nd-gen Prius), and I like both the Nissan LEAF and the C-Max Energi. Also, I need a raise before I can afford a new car. Hopefully in a couple of years, I'll have a really difficult time choosing between the LEAF, Focus EV, C-Max, Volt, Plugin Prius, and Prius V for our next kid-hauling daily driver. :-)
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