• Feb 12, 2012
If you were smitten by the little electric Think City and thought the company's recent bankruptcy put the kibosh on your chances of ever owning one of the plastic-paneled car, then *ahem, think again. It seems there are still some of the city runabouts to be had if you look in the right place.

One such location is Green Wheels in Chicago, IL. The dealership, as the name suggests, specializes in all-electric and hybrid vehicles and has a couple post-rebated demos on hand they can sell for as low as $17,995. If you're willing to lay out $31,500 for a brand-new one – and remember, there are rebates still available in some states that can bring that initial sticker down below $20,000 – they have a couple of those as well and say that they have access to more. While that price is nicely down from the pre-bankruptcy $36,495 MSRP, it's a little uncomfortably close to that of the Nissan Leaf and Mitsubishi i. Still, we liked the little coupe when we drove it and for some, this car just might be the bee's knees.

If you do happen to make the trip to Green Wheels, you might also get a chance to see the BYD e6 in person. The dealership will be offering the Chinese all-electric crossover later this year and already has one on the lot you can look over.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 32 Comments
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'd be tempted for around $15K. I'd buy the "Open" model for $22K.
      zee
      • 2 Years Ago
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      PR
      • 2 Years Ago
      There are a lot of comments here about warranties. I personally don't know that status of the warranty, and whether any company that might purchase Think!'s assets might voluntarily pick up their warranty obligations and try to re-start Think! sales. But even assuming it effectively has no warranty, that isn't that different than there being no warranty on an old Rav4 EV or Ranger EV. Or a home conversion. It could be a good deal for the right person.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PR
        It is hard to understand the pricing . . . but if you can get one for $20K and use the $7500 tax-credit, that is a net $12,500. For that price, not having a warranty could be tolerable. Some of the parts do exist in other cars and thus could be sourced. But largely, you would have to hope not to have problems.
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PR
        Not so much a warranty issue (although that would be a concern), more from a standpoint of simply no parts whatsoever. With Toyota and Ford, I would ASSUME that they would be able to find parts somewhere. With a dead company - not sure. That said - I would assume (again, assuming) that a TH!NK would be a relatively simple car on the drive train, and that the batteries would be replaceable. Would parts be that much of an issue on critical components? Feel free to correct me in the entirety, if necessary - but this thing doesn't strike me as being complex on the level of a Volt. And yes - $17.9K would be a good deal - for the $31K - wow - can we all (together now) say, "Nissan Leaf?"
      Nick
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cool. It's a nice little car. Too bad the company didn't make it.
        Jim McL
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Nick
        They did make it! Very well capitalized now, next generation vehicle due out this spring.
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      I would pay $13K for one. I'd pay $22K for a Think "Open".
        EZEE
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        you said $13k below. Frugal Spec is getting Frugal
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          I said I'd be 'tempted' at $15K and would buy at $13K. (Actually, I just didn't know if my first post got lost and forgot what number I wrote earlier. :-) ) But if I could really pick one up for a net $12K, that might be worth it as a lark. It is a cute little car and it should have a longer range than a Leaf since it is smaller. I'm also of Norwegian heritage so I'd like having a Norwegian-originated car. :-)
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          $15k
      Jim McL
      • 2 Years Ago
      I called Green Wheels today, they have sold most of the demo Thinks since this blog posting. They are an authorized dealer so they still have new Thinks and they sell substantially below what the Factory does, although I do not believe they will ship like the factory. The owner drives a Think as his main vehicle. If you have ever tried to park in Chicago, you would know why the Leaf is at a serious disadvantage to the Think. Green Wheels has factory trained technicians and offers all service. No problem with parts availability. They say Think is very well capitalized after being brought out of bankruptcy and they expect to see new 2012 models soon.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Jim McL
        hey jim, I m from the university of gent belgium.we have 2 thinks with lithium and one with zebra.this car is not working anumore.i have diagnostic equipement from think but not the sofware.i have these in double. My battery is empty and i cant charge him. The nearest workshop is about 400km from gent . I hope you can help me with the program. I can give you if you want the complete diagnostic tool(battery and car) Can you mail on my adres vermeulen.kurt@skynet.be Many thanks
      sirvixisvexed
      • 2 Years Ago
      Think's think tank made Think tank.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 2 Years Ago
      Bah, hopefully they kept the batteries charged. These cars have been probably sitting for a while now. A poorly designed 'battery management system' can be a 'battery murdering system', i'm a bit worried that this is the case. This could be a cool novelty ride. More like a museum piece of an electric car gallery showing how difficult a time EVs had getting into the market to compete with gas. If i had some serious money, i would pick one of these up for that reason, crazy as that sounds.
        Jim McL
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        The demo units have about 3000 miles on them, so they have not been sitting. The owner told me he drives a Think personally and his has 10,000 miles on it. All but one sold out in the few days since this blog post. Think probably has the best Battery Management System in the business. Ford put over $100 million into developing the BMS. I have tested mine at over 95% charging efficiency even at 120 volts. Severely beats the Mini E charging efficiency. And the Think ALWAYS charges, unlike the notoriously touchy Mini E.
      Ele Truk
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Th!nk makes a few appearances in the new Netflix Series "Lillyhammer". (although I doubt Netflix actually funded the series, I think they just picked it up when nobody else would)
        Jim McL
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Ele Truk
        Lilyhammer was co-produced by Netflix and Norwegian state TV. Think Global refused to provide a car for the filming, so they borrowed a Gen 5 Think from a private owner who happened to have also purchased the first Gen 4 Think some 12 years ago. His Gen 4 Think is described here: http://www.evguide.nu/100000.html Rumor was that Norwegian TV at first refused to air the show because they assumed that Think Global had payed for placing the car in the show.
      Roy_H
      • 2 Years Ago
      Outrageous price. First, these were extremely overpriced to begin with. Which is why they didn't sell. It is a spartan 2-seat econo car. Paying a huge premium for battery electric is just not justifiable. Now I don't know about this dealership, but if you bought this car and then took it out of State, you would have no support, no warranty, you would be entirely on your own to fix anything that goes wrong. That to me would reduce the price a further 50%, so I think it should be $8k to $10k.
      • 2 Years Ago
      What impact is this going to have on the EV Cup?
      Jim McL
      • 2 Years Ago
      Think North America still sells in the seven states with incentives. They never shut down and were purchased out of bankruptcy about as quickly as Chrysler and GM came out, only with more bidders. Us Think owners in North America still receive regular communication from Think, although the domain has changed to ems-think.com or asgren.com, depending on who you are communicating with. Production has not restarted yet but they said it would be spring. And since it is still easy to gets parts for the 4th generation Thinks that were built under Ford and still serviced by Ford dealers in Norway, nobody really expects any trouble getting parts for the 5th generation Thinks here. Remember, the 4th gen was a contemporary of the EV1 but they were not crushed. About 700 gen 4s are still running around Norway and many more around the rest of Europe. The only significant market for used EVs is the Think, with usually ten available on any given day that I have looked at www.finn.no and about half are the 4th gen. Try this in Google translate, today there are 30 Thinks for sale and they move pretty quickly: http://www.finn.no/finn/car/used/result?ENGINE/FUEL=4&sort=0&CAR_MODEL/MAKE=6734 In the US, http://cleancities.com/ told me months ago they will ship a Think to any state, unlike the Think factory. This Chicago outlet is a nice addition. For those who understand the importance of having full regenerative braking only on the accelerator pedal, and the importance of an accurate battery gauge with high resolution, and the importance of scratch-free and dent-free modern ABS body panels like the early Saturns, there is little choice in an EV at the moment other than Think. For those who just want their EV to look and drive like every other gas car, or if you need four seats, then go ahead and get a tin can car that loses range in the hills because the regenerative brakes are camouflaged in the friction brake pedal. It will look lousy in 5 years from the scratches and dents and faded paint. Those other cars are EVs with Halloween masks on, trying to look and act like gas cars. But they have a place in the market. But I don't want one!
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