There's a lot of history wrapped up in the 2013 Dodge Dart GTS 210 Tribute. For starters, it's supposed to commemorate 75 years of Mopar, which, in case you're wondering, stands for MOtor PARts, Chrysler's in-house go-fast aftermarket division.

Second, the GTS Tribute harkens back to the Dart of old, which was built between 1960 and 1976, and specifically the GTS model of the late 1960s. Never mind that this new Dart has absolutely nothing in common with that rear-wheel-drive, body-on-frame muscle car other than its name.

Finally, it's easy to see some Dodge Neon SRT4 in the Dart GTS, most notably in its carbon fiber hood with a single, centered hood scoop, which feeds cold air to a Mopar intake that bumps horsepower to 210. Also take note of the 18-inch, titanium-finish ten-spoke wheels and the Ruby Red and black motif both inside and out.

Buyers hoping to snag a 2013 Dodge Dart GTS 210 Tribute will have to get out their aftermarket Mopar catalogs, as this car won't be made available at Dodge dealerships.
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2013 Dodge Dart 'GTS 210 Tribute'

For the all-new 2013 Dodge Dart, Mopar will offer more than 150 accessories, the most in the compact-car segment.

Hot off the heels of its worldwide production debut at the 2012 North American International Auto Show, Mopar wasted no time giving the 2013 Dodge Dart even more sporting pretensions both inside and out. The all-new Dodge Dart embodies class-leading and class-exclusive features in many areas including aerodynamics, technology and safety, and the stage kits by Mopar enhance these attributes. The Alfa Romeo-based Dodge Dart already has sporty driving dynamics baked into its DNA, and Team Mopar added even more distinction to reinforce the car's fun-to-drive nature.

Stage 1 appearance package
The exterior picks up several matte-black trim pieces, including a lower chin spoiler, side sills, rear spoiler and rear-diffuser panel. A lightweight carbon-fiber hood with large air scoop and 18-inch, 10-spoke forged alloy titanium-colored wheels finish off exterior modifications.

Red and black is carried over into the interior, which has been refined beyond the 14 interior color and trim options available in the all-new 2013 Dodge Dart. Ruby Red is the dominant color used on Katzkin leather seat fronts, door panels, center armrest and map-pocket inserts. Black accent stitching is used in the seats and armrest, as well. Piano Black trim is used on the shifter bezel, cup holder bezel and the dash-vent bezels. Final interior touches include a black suede instrument cluster brow with red accent stitching, a Piano Black accented floating island bezel and a Ruby Red and black leather-wrapped steering wheel with red accent stitching.

Stage 2 performance package
The Dodge Dart GTS 210 Tribute performance calibration has been employed maximizing fuel/air mix and spark advance, with an improved air-flow intake and low back-pressure exhaust to achieve 210 horsepower from a base engine of 184 horsepower.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 66 Comments
      LUSTSTANG S-197
      • 2 Years Ago
      Dibs!!
      Jo$e
      • 2 Years Ago
      This car looks like it's pissed off!
      Domhnall
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Dart of old, in fact all Chryslers from 1960 model year on were unibody designs, not body on frame. Do some fact checking sometimes, I knew that when I was child.
        Matt
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Domhnall
        You're right about the Dart but wrong about all Chryslers being unibody. The Imperial wasn't a unibody until '67
      throwback
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not bad looking. I would prefer a hood without a scoop, but not bad.
      gtv4rudy
      • 2 Years Ago
      The lines on this car will age very well just by the huge positive reaction from the public in the way it looks. There were very few complaints about it at the Detroit Auto Show.
      Vinny68
      • 2 Years Ago
      Maybe some might not like all of the MOPAR add-ons. But I don't care who you are - that is going to be one nice looking compact when they start showing up at dealers.
      threefortyduster
      • 2 Years Ago
      You did not actually call the original Dart body on frame did you?
        A P
        • 2 Years Ago
        @threefortyduster
        Of course they did.....they are almost as dense as the Edmunds peeps. Almost that is. Nobody is more of a poser and idiot than Mgrath.
          threefortyduster
          • 2 Years Ago
          @A P
          Honestly, Edmunds doesn't bother me too much, neither does Autoblog. However...I expect "enthusiast" writers to have a basic knowledge of what they're claiming. It is well known that Chrysler hasn't put a frame under a car in over 40 years. I do have to say, I read Inside Line a lot to see their long term blog, because, well...at least it's updated. The long term tests here are kind of a joke.
      Sasha
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's not actually a sporty compact, but at least it pays homage to them.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        T
        • 2 Years Ago
        It's a continuation of the Neon styling which is nice. It's by far the best looking compact now. I can't wait until they are in production.
      Matt
      • 2 Years Ago
      There's no such thing as a body-on-frame Dart. They were unibodies.
        Nick Allain
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Matt
        Am I dyslexic? I read that body-on-fart Dame and started laughing.
        scriber72
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Matt
        As confirmed by the brochures (I love old car brochures): http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Dodge/1960_Dodge/1960_Dodge_Dart_Brochure/1960%20Dodge%20Dart%20Brochure-04.html "...park it next to anything with the smuggest, most self-satisfied feeling in the world."
          artandcolour2010
          • 2 Years Ago
          @scriber72
          you doubted us, lol? I've spent my life studying the history of cars! great link though. I love old car brochures too. I have about 1000 of them from the '60s and '70s with a lot from the '80s and a few from the '50s.
          scriber72
          • 2 Years Ago
          @scriber72
          Very cool artandcolour--jealous!
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        MyerShift
        • 2 Years Ago
        Wow. So much wrong with this I don't even know where to start counter-pointing.
        Elmo
        • 2 Years Ago
        So you're saying the Prius is a pretty sporty car?
        Hemihead90
        • 2 Years Ago
        Says the guy that probably drives a Prius.
          Ron
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Hemihead90
          No... I don't drive Hybrid's; They are Gimmicky, and not cost effective. I drive an 2009 Nissan GTR, and 2006 Pontiac GTO (daily driver) currently.
        Ron
        • 2 Years Ago
        I think they try to be sporty... if they ever figure out how to make a car that does not weight close to two tons and finally get it though their skulls that just about every motor is a "Hemi"... they migh make a good car.
          Ron
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ron
          I know what a Hemi is, obviously... you are a bit confused. Not a single motor produced today has a Hemispherical combustion chamber. To include the modern day "Hemi" motors. Hemispherical heads were an evolution from the "flat" heads commonly found in the 1940's and 1950's (in the USA at least). By the end of the 1970's there were no true hemispherical head designs in production. As people quickly figured out that there are MUCH better combustion chamber designs. After all most European car makers, such as Jaguar for example, were making hemi-spherical heads in the late 1940's.. and and phased them out for a multi-spherical head design by the late 60's. There are NO modern day heads that I am aware of that use a canted design. In fact I think you would have to go REALLY far back to find the last cant head motor. So again.. Just about every engine made is some form of hemi-spherical head. They all employ different shapes and combination of circles, and none of them are true hemi-spherical.
          Hemihead90
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ron
          Hemi: Short for "Hemispherical" or "half sphere". They are called Hemi because the combustion chamber (the empty space in the cylinder where fuel and air mix and ignite) is hemispherical where MOST engines are canted, or shaped like the roof of a house. This allows for more air to flow through the engine, resulting in more power and torque. "Every other motor" is not a Hemi for emission reasons and because they don't need that much awesome under the hood. ;)
          Ron
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ron
          I know what a Hemi is... and today's "Hemi" motors do not use a
          Hemihead90
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Ron
          I've taken apart a 5.7 HEMI V8 in a Ram, it has a hemispherical combustion chamber. Only difference between the new ones and the 426 HEMI is the size and the new ones have a "quench" area on the side of the combustion chamber. The new ones also have 2 spark plugs per cylinder.
      mrx19
      • 2 Years Ago
      Not even on the market yet and they're already screwing up an attractive design with tacky J.C Whitney add ons.
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