Toyota has boosted the miles-per-gallon-equivalent (MPGe) ratings for the Prius Plug-in hybrid-electric that it plans to debut in the U.S. next month. The Japanese automaker now estimates that the car will get 95 MPGe in its all-electric mode, up from its prior estimate of 87 MPGe, according to Toyota Division Group Vice President Bob Carter and cited by multiple media outlets.

Once the plug-in goes through its 15-mile all-electric range, the car will get 50 miles per gallon from its hybrid-electric powertrain, up from Toyota's prior estimate of 49 MPG.

By comparison, the most fuel-efficient car sold in the U.S. is the Mitsubishi i battery-electric vehicle, which gets an EPA-rated 112 MPGe. The Nissan Leaf battery-electric gets 99 MPGe while the Chevrolet Volt extended-range plug-in is rated at 60 MPGe.

Toyota initially estimated fuel-economy figures north of 100 MPGe when unveiling the car at the Frankfurt Motor Show last September. AutoblogGreen reviewed the car here.


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  • 113 Comments
      DRstrangelove
      • 2 Years Ago
      The volt is history. The whole series hybrid thing was doomed from the very beginning. The best thing GM can do right now is buy the technology from toyota like GM did a few years back.
        DRstrangelove
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DRstrangelove
        * ford did a few years ago.
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          Ford did not buy the technology from Toyota - here is an excerpt from a quaint little publication, called, "Autoblog Green": The reality is that Ford independently developed its own hybrid system at the same time Toyota was doing its own. The basic architecture of both systems is the same and both are based on the concepts developed and patented by TRW engineers in the late 1960s. When Ford introduced the Escape Hybrid, Toyota went after the Blue Oval for infringing on its patents. Ford had patents of its own on the technology that Toyota was using. Eventually, the two companies reached a cross-licensing agreement that gives both companies the right to build their own systems. Such cross-licensing agreements are common in these kinds of cases, but Ford did not use the Toyota hybrid system. The only other company that uses Toyota's system is Nissan for its Altima hybrid, and they actually buy hardware from Toyota. We continue deconstructing Reynolds' arguments after the jump (the article was picking on everyone's favorite paper, the Wall Street Journal, for saying for used the Toyota system).
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @DRstrangelove
        "The whole series hybrid thing was doomed from the very beginning." What in the world are you talking about? This plug-in Prius and the Volt are actually very very similar. The difference is that the Volt has a bigger battery so it has a longer EV range and the Volt has a more powerful electric motor so it can go freeway speeds on electric only. The Volt actually uses the gas engine to drive the wheels at very high speeds exactly like the Prius. Get a clue before you spew.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Volt's bigger battery can drive only 15 mins at 85 mph and to recharge 10 hours. Gasoline is superior in this case because it refuels in mins. Volt's gas engine does NOT clutches to the wheels most of the time. The speed and torque restriction prevents it. That forces it to go through electrical path and take conversion loss. Since Volt's transmission has 3 clutches, it becomes a mechanical transmission. Prius has pure electric transmission.
      BipDBo
      • 2 Years Ago
      I think that people are just looking at the efficiency and making unfair comparisons to the Volt. Here are some points toward the Volt. * The Volt has full performance under EV mode, whereas the Prius does not. The volt gets full throttle and highway speeds without starting the engine. In other words, within the EV range, you can drive anywhere without using any petrol and withou driving like grandma. The Prius is a plug-in hybrid, but the Volt is truly in the hard earned sub category of PHEV, extended range EV. * The Volt has over twice the EV range. Jay Leno drove his new Volt for his typical daily commute for a year and never put gas in the car. Unless you drive 10 miles per day, off of the highway, you can't do that with the Pirus. If you drive that little, like myself, a cheap ICE may be your best option anyway. * The Volt is a quicker car. * The plug for the Prius comes at a cost. It's getting into the price ballpark of the Volt. If you qualify for the $7500 credit for the Volt, and no credit for the Prius, then they are the same price. * The Prius is so last decade. Will the Volt and Prius be cross-shopped? Sure. If you drive long commutes, and gas efficiency is most important, buy the Prius. If you drive around 40 miles per day, and want to stick it to oil, buy the Volt and you'll use next to no fuel.
        Dave R
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Don't forget that if you are able to plug in frequently, the Prius plug-in can get a nice boost in EV miles over the course of a day. If you are a commuter and can plug in at work, even on a regular 120V plug you'll have fully recharged in time for lunch (3 hours from empty to full on 120V/12A), and fully recharged again before you go home. Cut that in half if you have a J1772 EVSE handy. With enough J1772 charging points one could get well over 50 miles in EV mode a day with the Prius plug-in.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        "Unless you drive 10 miles per day, off of the highway, you can't do that with the Pirus. If you drive that little, like myself, a cheap ICE may be your best option anyway." I'd suggest a bike would be the best option, in that case. That's what I've found works best for me.
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        "Unless you drive 10 miles per day, off of the highway, you can't do that with the Pirus. If you drive that little, like myself, a cheap ICE may be your best option anyway." If if is pure economics, it really doesn't matter how much you drive, a cheap ICE is still the best option. A Ford Fiesta and $15000 in Bank for Gas, will save you more than a Volt will.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          "If if is pure economics, it really doesn't matter how much you drive, a cheap ICE is still the best option." Unless you have a magic crystal ball, you have absolute NO WAY of knowing that. How much will gas cost next year? 2 years from now? 3 years from now? 5 years from now? Oil companies are putting our reports saying that oil usage in the USA will drop over the next 20 years due to price pressures. Meanwhile, the population is always growing. You know that means? The price of oil is going to rise over the next 20 years to ratio out the oil. If it starts costing $3000 a year in gasoline, that $15K in the bank won't last you very long.
        DRstrangelove
        • 2 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        The volt is also heavier has smaller interior more expensive burns at the drop of a hat more expensive to fuel more likely to break down has no track record is being outsold by the prius by more than 10 to 1 will never turn a profit just to name a few
          Smurf
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          @EZEE But the Prius is NOT $8K - $10K cheaper because it only has a $2500K tax break. The cost difference is $2K - $3K... Is it work $3K for an extra 25miles EV range, and 100% EV usage even at 100 MPH? I think most would say yes.
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          'burns at the drop of a hat' You have just confirmed what we suspected. You are an idiot and a troll.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          And it killed your dog too!
          EZEE
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          @Dave Yea, without that comment, the post would have largely been valid. I agree that they really are not in the same class. However, if the Prius is substantially cheaper (like, $8k - $10k), then it offers a good alternative to the Volt. Both being good cars, but one is more affordable.
          Smurf
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          Yawn... Despite all of DR's claims being proven false we still have to hear this noise.... You left a few things out with the Volt..... FASTER THAN A PRIUS MORE FUN TO DRIVE THAN A BMW ZERO GALLONS OF GAS AT 100MPH IS "NOT" THE UGLIEST CAR ON THE ROAD 1ST YEAR SALES WERE HIGHER THAN 1ST YEAR PRIUS SALES MADE IN DETROIT
          DaveMart
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          UK: The Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid and the Vauxhall Ampera (which will also be sold - with some modifications - as the Chevrolet Volt) are due to see their first UK deliveries in early 2012. Continue reading the main story Cars and availability dates Mitsubishi i-MiEV: Jan 2011 Smart fortwo electric drive: Jan 2011 Peugeot iOn: Jan 2011 Nissan Leaf: March 2011 Tata Vista: March 2011 Citroen CZero: Early 2011 Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid: Early 2012 Chevrolet Volt: Early 2012 Vauxhall Ampera: Early 2012 Where the eligible cars are leased by drivers instead of being bought, the up to £5,000 subsidy will mean a deduction on their monthly leasing fees. ' http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11985866 Happy days!
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @DRstrangelove
          Smurf -- In Colorado and a couple of other states, the Volt is actually cheaper than the Toyota PHEV Prius after tax credits. Cool, eh?
      Rotation
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Prius PHEV has no all-electric range. It has a mostly electric range. At any time in that range the gas engine will kick on because you call for more performance than it can offer on electricity only. And the Volt is 94 MPGe, not 60.
        usbseawolf2000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Prius PHV 80 hp electric motor and 51 hp PHV battery is suitable for city driving. 15 miles at low speed could last an hour. High speed driving is better for gas since Volt's battery run out of juice in 15 mins at 85 mph. After that it will be a garage queen for 10 hours. The alternative is 37 mpg with premium gas. Why is it so hard to understand the concept of using electricity for city and gas for Highway? Prius PHV is optimized gor both fuels.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          Let's flip your numbers around. If you are driving 15 miles an hour then you can probably go 50+ miles with Volt on electricity alone. Of course I'd probably shoot myself in the head instead of have a commute at that speed. At a more reasonable pace you can probably do a 20 mile each-way commute burning zero gasoline every weekday. At 85mph, you can do zero electric miles with Prius. Why is it so hard to understand that most daily driving is relative short and if you charge up every night, you can most of your driving using no gasoline at all and at any legal speed? The plug-in Prius has an advantage of being cheaper and that is nice. But it really isn't much cheaper because the Volt gets the full $7500 tax-credit while the plug-in Prius only get $2500.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          As you have said, nobody drive 4 hours at 15 mph so Volt's battery is oversized for typical city driving. That's why it is better to optimize the gas mileage for the highway driving. "Drive using no gas at all" argument is getting old. Volt owners put 1/3 of the miles on gas. Yes, Volt has the potential to use less gas. However, there are consequences because of the big battery.
      george costanza
      • 2 Years Ago
      it's pretty good....when we go to war with Iran or when they just along with Saudis shut off spigots...we can at least get around town....with all elec........ nobody is beating prius family. not volt. not leaf.....plug in is awesome..best of both worlds. when I see chargers everywhere I will buy all electric......but my town has potholes you can drive a whole car in...which might need to be fixed first...
      Spec
      • 2 Years Ago
      What are these numbers based on? What you actually get is heavily dependent on your driving pattern. I believe the statistics show that a group of ACTUAL REAL Chevy Volt drivers are averaging over 115MPG. http://www.voltstats.net/ (Of course that is a self-selected group . . . I wonder what the total over the entire fleet is. Is that known?) It will be interesting to see what the ACTUAL REAL Toyota plug-in drivers get.
        paulwesterberg
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        mpge is needed to account for the electricity used. The volts computed mileage display entirely ignores electricity used and only counts gasoline burned so its mpg is inflated.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          I'm not "claiming" anything, I am reporting a number on that web site. "Take account of fuel production efficiency. 32.8% for electricity and 83% for gasoline" What are you talking about? What doe % efficiency numbers have to do with anything? A typical solar panel is only like 12% efficient, does that mean that solar energy is bad? Of course not. Put up some metrics that have some useful meaning in the real world.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          62 MPGe average is way lower than 115 that Spec claimed. Take account of fuel production efficiency. 32.8% for electricity and 83% for gasoline, per Department Of Energy. Believe it or not, Volt is no better than 42 MPG Prius v wagon.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          The Volt calculates both MPG and MPGe, along with all kinds of other cool stuff like Charge Sustained MPG, percent of time in EV mode, etc. Here are the OnStar reports that the Volt calculates for drivers and reports to them: voltstats.net
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          I am talking about total energy efficiency. Fuel production efficiency + vehicle efficiency.
        usbseawolf2000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        115 MPG is without consideration of electricity consumption. It takes the miles driven under electricity with gallon of gasoline combined. It is pretty meaningless number. It only promote political side of the car.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          32.8% efficient to generate electricity and 2/3 are from fossil fuel. Think about it.
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          It is not meaningless at all. What matters it the cost to drivers (and the emissions for some) and the electricity miles are dirt cheap compared to the gas miles (and less emitting).
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @usbseawolf2000
          it has everything to do with energy efficiency and emission and carbon footprint.
        JakeY
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        MPGe in EV mode is different than MPG gasoline the people are trying to figure out over at volt stats. The former is an objective measure of the car's capabilities according to the EPA cycle. The latter depends a lot more on how well the specific car matches the driving patterns of driver and completely ignores electricity usage.
          JakeY
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          @PR Well, I'm just saying the 115MPG number quoted completely ignores the electricity number. The 62 MPGe number on volt stats is slightly better in that it assumes 93 MPGe when running on electricity. But that is still different from a real world MPGe number, so for the most part it still ignores real world electricity usage.
          PR
          • 2 Years Ago
          @JakeY
          The Volt calculates both MPGe and MPG, as you can see over on voltstats.net if you play with the tabs so you see all the information. There are plenty of stats for every person's own personal needs. MPG is all that matters If someone has their own solar panels, and the big thing that they care about is not using gas and don't care about how much sunshine they are pumping into their Volt.
        PR
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Spec, voltstats.net certainly is a self-selected group, but it also happens to be close to 5% of all total Volt owners in the United States. That is a huge sample group! Even self-selection would have a hard time influencing the results of a sample size that large. OK. I'm done plugging voltstats.net for this comment section. *grin*
          Spec
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PR
          I point out the self selection since that probably does bias the numbers a bit. I suspect the people that share their data are more likely to be the people that are trying to stretch their electric miles and reduce gas miles. So I would guess that the fleet 'MPG' would be closer to 100MPG or so.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PR
          The point is, electricity joy ride comes with consequences. 15 mins @85 mph and the joyride is over. Time for 10 hours recharge or pay with 37 mpg on premium.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PR
          That site also said 35 MPG when running on premium gasoline. Ouch!
      Larz Larzen
      • 2 Years Ago
      I get a negative -4 for asking a question?
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 2 Years Ago
      are these available yet? has anyone bought one? I think they are supposed to be available but it's not exactly talk of the town. too little too late to get attention maybe
        usbseawolf2000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Production started. The shipment to arrive at the end of the month. Delivery on early March.
        DaveMart
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        US release: 'Production model PHV was rolled out at the Green Drive Expo and the company announced that the vehicle will be ready for sale in March 2012.' http://www.inquisitr.com/142576/toyota-unveils-prius-plug-in-model-phv/
      At_Liberty
      • 2 Years Ago
      This post is misleading.... The Volt gets 93 MPGe in all electric mode, and that is for the first 35 miles or less each day. If the plug-in Prius gets 95 MPGe each day, then it's only for the first 15 miles or less... Apples to apples, people.
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Volt gets 93 MPGe! (as has been reported here, at this site quite often!) Why not fix the article?
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is all a load of crap. My little red wagon gets 2,000,000 miles per gallon; it has no engine, is pulled by me, and can coast down hill (the gas usage is the splash from when I was filling the law mower). How about giving a bit more info on that MPG rating?! Like, the conditions under which the little darling gets those 97 MPGe's, including the gallons used, cost per gallon, KWH used to charge the jewel, and cost per KWH. Do you ever run the A/C? Heater? Radio? I will likely be using a heater or A/C, and usually like to play the radio (that's why they put them in cars - people like to use the radio). Then I can start figuring out the true cost to get 97 MPGe (never mind the cost to purchase). Then I can say something intelligent, like, I get 97 MPGe, when gas costs $2/gallon, only driving on level ground, windows up, no heater, no air, no radio, no braking, only scooting along at 45 mph. But we don't have that info because it is not flattering. Neither is the assumption by the manufacturer that we are too stupid to ask these questions. Electric cars are merely coal-powered cars (your electricity comes from somewhere, genius). And am I going to get in the sardine can, with all those pickup trucks on the road? I'll get smushed. Oh, get rid of the pickups? Well, what about the semi-trailers? I love my mother-in-law, awesome lady. But if I didn't love her, I'd get her an electric car.
        • 2 Years Ago
        What's with the big rant? This post is about the Prius Plug-In, not a political website.
      Fgergergrergr
      • 2 Years Ago
      Volt is 94 MPGe (EV Mode)
      PeterScott
      • 2 Years Ago
      In preliminary testing the Plug in Prius kicked the crap out of the Volt: http://www.insideline.com/chevrolet/volt/2011/comparison-test-2011-chevrolet-volt-vs-2010-toyota-prius-phv.html EV-mode electricity consumption (*kWh/100 miles) *unlike mpg, smaller is better: Volt 39.0 Prius PHV 23.2 HV-mode (hybrid vehicle) gasoline fuel economy (mpg): Volt 31.1 Prius PHV 47.2 The Volt comes out ahead in range though: EV-mode electric range (miles): Volt 33.9 Prius PHV 14.6
        BipDBo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PeterScott
        "EV-mode electricity consumption (*kWh/100 miles) *unlike mpg, smaller is better: Volt 39.0 Prius PHV 23.2" This is kind of misleading. With the Pris PHV, they would have had to drive it like they had Miss Daisy in the back (and probably no AC) just to keep the engine off to maintain EV mode. With the Volt, they could have driven it like Tanner Foust. Plus, to consume those kw in 100 miles, the Volt would need around 3 charge cycles whereas the Prius would need around 7.
          PeterScott
          • 2 Years Ago
          @BipDBo
          If you are afraid of the Gas Engine starting, why have one? Get a Leaf, double the Volts range for less money and no ICE to burn gas every.
        PeterScott
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PeterScott
        Yes the Volt has longer EV range, I acknowledged that. The Prius has less than 1/3 the battery so of course it has a shorter range. But the efficiency differences are embarrassing for GM. I don't think a quicker 0-60 will compensate in the green market. 31 MPG vs 47 MPG. This is not even in the same ballpark. 39 (KWh/100 vs 23 (KWh/100) . This is again completely outclassed.
          usbseawolf2000
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          @jim - You are in 27% that has 15 to 35 miles daily miles. The rest (72%) are better off with Prius PHV. Prius PHV using some gas still get 95 MPGe and rated e-AT-PZEV emission. You may save a few teaspoon of gas here and there but the compact size compromise and the extra cost over a midsize is not worth enough in my opinion.
          Jim Illo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PeterScott
          I have a Volt. I commute 30 miles a day, 12 miles on 70+ mph freeway, and I often like to/have to accelerate pretty aggresively. In a Prius Plug-in I would be using gas every day in much of my commute. In my Volt, I have gone as long as 6 weeks without using a drop of gas. I don't see how a Plug-in-Prius would compete with that, if one's goal is to decrease oil consumption/greenhouse gas emmissions (my goal, and most greenies goals - over 50% of my Volt's power is nuclear).
        Jim Illo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PeterScott
        Thanks for the info, and link. The Volt kicks the crap out of the Plug-in Prius in the "Fun to Drive" and ability to go 35 miles TOTALLY gas free, whithout worrying about pressing the gas pedal down more than halfway, or going over 60 mph (where the Prius will always use gasoline). Here are two cued-up videos to compare the Plug-in Prius and Volt. First the Volt: http://youtu.be/tK63kMy4-XU?t=6m Now the Plug-in Prius: http://youtu.be/rvSVfRUsTpc?t=3m6s
          MTN RANGER
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Jim Illo
          As a Volt owner, I concur. I'm averaging over 38MPG on Gas mode (in the Winter!) and 36-40 miles on a charge (in the Winter, summer over 40). 31/32 kWh/100 miles and I'm not even babying the car.
        Spec
        • 2 Years Ago
        @PeterScott
        There is a performance difference to take into consideration. The Volt has got more pep and can do freeway speeds on electric only.
          Ryan
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Plus the Volt can go 40 miles in EV mode. It would be interesting to compare how much gasoline drivers of each type burn.
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