teen driver

A new study from the water-is-still-wet research department has found that teens may have been the victims of peer pressure just before a crash. The studies were crafted by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and State Farm. The first study surveyed 198 teens and found that those who were more likely to have friends pile into a vehicle with them were also apt to call themselves "thrill seekers." Those teens also said they didn't want their parents to set rules or keep an eye on their comings and goings. In addition, they were less likely to perceive the risks associated with driving in general.

The second study, meanwhile, analyzed information from 677 teens who were involved in serious crashes while behind the wheel. As it turns out, both male and female drivers were more likely to be distracted just before the incident, with 71 percent of males saying they were distracted by their passengers. The study found 47 percent of female teens admitted the same. The study also found teen males with passengers were six times more likely to perform an illegal maneuver and twice as likely to drive aggressively before a crash compared to their counterparts driving alone.

While it's no secret that teens with passengers are more likely get into an incident, the two studies help shed some light on why that is.