Chevrolet has purchased seven spots.

It's the two-minute warning in terms of Super Bowl advertising and Chevrolet still has some ground to cover. General Motors' largest brand is still mulling its advertising lineup with less than two weeks remaining until the New York Giants and New England Patriots meet in the big game.

Chevrolet has purchased seven spots. Exactly which vehicles will be featured and at what times is still stirring healthy debate at GM headquarters.

"Every day, we're changing the spots of what's running where," said Chris Perry, Chevrolet's vice president of global marketing and strategy. "We're probably going to push it to the end."

That comes Tuesday, Jan. 31 when NBC wants final decisions. Click past the jump to continue reading.

Two ads will air pregame, three during the first half and two following the Super Bowl.

Here's what Chevy executives know so far: Of the seven spots, two will air during pregame programming, three will air during the first half of the game and two will air following the Super Bowl's conclusion.

Two of the three in-game advertisements will be 60-second spots that profile the Silverado and Sonic, the latter of which features the Fun.'s "We Are Young."

Three of the five 30-second spots will feature the Sonic. There are also two Volt ads, including one that pokes fun at the constant questions surrounding its electric inner workings. There's no word yet on another Volt ad that has been making the rounds online, which features Hamtramck, MI, the car's origin of assembly. And don't forget the "Happy Grad" ad, which features a recent college grad who mistakenly believes his parents bought him a Camaro convertible as a graduation gift (below).



It's unknown in which position those spots will run. The remaining two spots are still under discussion, although executives said they're attempting to meld both lighthearted and serious messaging during the game.

"Our real challenge is to change opinion and consideration of Chevrolets."

"Our real challenge is to change opinion and consideration of Chevrolets," said Rich Martinek, manager of the Chevy ad group. "Once an iconic brand, we've had some struggles in the past. Now we're headed in the right direction."

In recent days, that direction has included consolidating its global advertising operations. GM announced it has chosen London's Carat agency. Previously, it had employed more than 50 agencies that purchased ads.

That direction will also include more social media than ever before. Chevrolet introduced the "Chevy Game Time" app during the NFC Championship game, and it has already been downloaded 130,000 times. Among other novelties, the app allows users to register to win 20 Chevy models that GM will give away during Super Bowl festivities.



They've also streamlined advertising efforts with the Facebook sites of individual dealers, purchased automotive exclusivity on NBC's livestreaming of the game online and advertising exclusivity on the #SuperBowl hashtag on Twitter.

Overall, executives expect 500 million impressions on Facebook and 1.5 billion impressions from their entire Super Bowl advertising campaign.

"We're not just on the screen, but on the second screen as well," said Perry, noting that consumers are increasingly engaged online while simultaneously watching television. "So this is a way for people to engage with Chevrolet, and an avenue we can use in the future to engage with consumers."