Nissan has announced plans to build a new manufacturing facility in Mexico. The company will invest $2 billion in a new complex situated in Aguascalientes, Mexico to help produce the automaker's B platform models. The plant is expected to begin operations in late 2013 and should be capable of producing up to 175,000 units annually during phase one. Nissan says the endeavor will create up to 3,000 direct jobs in the area with another 9,000 positions created via the supply chain necessary to support the facility.

The plant will be Nissan's third in Mexico and is part of a strategy that should allow the company to produce more than one million units annually in the country. Nissan claims no other automaker is investing in our southern neighbor with the same level of commitment. Click past the jump for the full press release.
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NISSAN TO BUILD NEW, $2.0 BILLION MANUFACTURING COMPLEX IN AGUASCALIENTES, MEXICO, GROW CAPACITY IN THE AMERICAS


- Phase I to enable 175,000 units of small car production capacity in the Americas –
- 3,000 direct and up to 9,000 indirect positions will be created in the community –

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. today announced plans to invest up to $2.0 billion USD for an all-new manufacturing complex in Aguascalientes, Mexico, to support the company's Americas growth strategy. The facility, which will complement Nissan's two existing Mexican factories, is scheduled to begin operations in late 2013. During the initial phase of its development, the new complex will support production of up to 175,000 units annually of Nissan's 'B' platform products. Further expansion of the site will be considered in phases as product and capacity needs are formalized.

The new complex in Aguascalientes will allow Nissan's existing and future operations to share critical resources. An all-new supplier park also will be built on the site.

Up to 3,000 direct jobs will be created initially at the new facility, with approximately 9,000 positions to be generated within the supply chain and wider community. With these additional jobs, Nissan's total headcount in Mexico will expand to nearly 13,500.

"Mexico is a key engine for Nissan's growth in the Americas," said Carlos Ghosn, chairman and chief executive officer, Nissan Motor Co, Ltd. "Together with our new plant in Brazil, this new manufacturing facility in Aguascalientes is an important pillar in our strategy to ensure that Nissan has the capacity it needs to increase sales volume and market share across the Americas."

Investment in Aguascalientes
Nissan's $2.0 billion USD investment will support development of the site in Aguascalientes – Nissan's third in Mexico – and will lay the groundwork for the facility to expand in the future. While other Mexican locations were considered, the State of Aguascalientes was chosen for its proximity to Nissan's existing manufacturing plant in the same state, which offers direct access to skilled labor and suppliers.

The addition of an incremental production site in Aguascalientes will prepare Nissan to produce more than one million units annually in Mexico in the midterm. Today, Nissan operates two manufacturing facilities in Mexico – one 85 km south of Mexico City in Cuernavaca that produces small cars and light commercial and pickup truck models, and a second in Aguascalientes that produces small cars for the domestic, U.S. and Latin American markets. In 2011, Nissan set a domestic production record with more than 600,000 vehicles manufactured at its Mexican plants.

"In Aguascalientes, we reciprocate the trust that Nissan has deposited in our State for 30 years with work, dedication and effort," said Carlos Lozano de la Torre, Governor of the State of Aguascalientes, Mexico. "During this new stage, we are solidifying our friendship, which will translate into success for this great global company and a more international profile for Mexico and better quality of life for the people of Aguascalientes thanks to new employment and wealth. We would like to extend our gratitude to Carlos Ghosn and the great Nissan family for extending their support, so that Nissan's new manufacturing complex could become a reality here in our home and their home."

The first phase of development for the new Aguascalientes site will include installation of body, trim and chassis and paint manufacturing capability as well as associated parts warehousing and logistics operations. An on-site test track also will be constructed to allow for off-line quality assurance testing of all new-model production.

"No other automaker is investing in Mexico more than Nissan," said Jose Munoz, president and general director, Nissan Mexico. "Nissan's investment in new manufacturing, engineering and technology resources in Aguascalientes validates what thousands of our employees, suppliers and customers already know. Behind our market leadership is an unparalleled commitment to deliver the best vehicles for Mexico and more than 100 international markets."

Growing capacity to support Americas' market expansion
Nissan's expansion in Mexico follows the company's recent announcement that it will build an all-new manufacturing facility in Resende in the Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro. That factory will begin production in the first half of 2014 and, together with the newly installed capacity in Mexico, will provide Nissan with the capacity to fuel its growth throughout the Americas region.

In 2011, Nissan's sales outpaced the Americas automotive industry, rising 17.2 percent to 1,561,230 units. This gain moved Nissan into the No. 2 ranking among Asian brands in the Americas with an overall market share of 7.5 percent, up from 7.0 percent one year earlier and 6.6 percent in 2009.

In the U.S., Nissan has gained market share for six consecutive years, ending 2011 with 8.2 percent of the U.S. market, up from 6 percent just a few years ago. In Mexico, Nissan has been the market leader for three consecutive years and ended 2011 with a record market share of 24.8 percent. In Brazil, Nissan's business has been rapidly expanding with sales that nearly doubled in 2011. Nissan was Brazil's fastest-growing automotive brand in 2011 and is now the 7th best-selling car brand in the country. In Latin America, Nissan finished 2011 with 10 percent market share, up 0.4 points from the year prior.

Nissan in Mexico
For more than 50 years Nissan has built an increasing presence in Mexico. Today, six of the ten most popular vehicles sold in Mexico are Nissan models. In 2011, the company sold 224,509 units in Mexico, an increase of 18.5 percent over the previous year, and Nissan Mexicana's 2011 market share of 24.8 percent has never been surpassed by any automotive brand in more than two decades.

The company, headquartered in Mexico City, operates corporate, marketing, sales, manufacturing, distribution and design facilities throughout the country including in the cities of Aguascalientes, Distrito Federal, Cuernavaca and Toluca.

Nissan's Mexican production includes the March, Sentra, Versa, Tiida, the historically popular Tsuru, as well as the NP300 light trucks. Seventy percent of production is exported to 100 international markets. Approximately, 80 percent of vehicle content is made in Mexico. The company currently sells 22 vehicle nameplates in Mexico from its global vehicle portfolio.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 52 Comments
      Jakes
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm so annoyed about the racists comments of many people here, I think is great news for my country that will improve the economy and life of a lot of people, and get this US citizens: Not every Mexican is a drug seller or assassin, I could assure you that most of the people is hard working, peaceful and honest, so please stop insulting us.
      lne937s
      • 2 Years Ago
      Nissan has been localizing production to where people are buying their cars. More cars being built in Mexico because Nissan is the top selling car maker in Mexico with 25% market share-- 6% ahead of second place GM. It only makes sense for them to build models that will be primarily sold in Central America and South America (think Versa sedan) in Mexico http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-01-11/mexico-dec-auto-sales-and-market-share-by-company-table-.html Nissan localizing production is also expanding jobs in the US, particularly for predominantly US market cars like the Altima. 150 additional engineers are being hired in Michigan this month to help develop US market models in the US: http://www.theoaklandpress.com/articles/2012/01/10/news/local_news/doc4f0c856842dc6295228214.txt 1100 additional assembly jobs in Tenn this last month: http://www.newschannel5.com/story/16231476/nissan-hiring-1100-at-job-fair-saturday And those hiring announcements from the past couple months are just a small portion of the US hiring in the past year, not to mention the comming years as additional US production comes on line. They are also building additional production capacity at their US plants for new models. Remember that Obama reference last night to the US soon leading the world in Li Ion batteries? Nissan is building the largest Li Ion plant in the world in Tennessee. Nissan is expanding rapidly in the US, UK and Mexico-- no US jobs are going to Mexico ot the UK because all three counties are expanding. The place they are scaling back is Japan, where around 1/5th of their cars are now made.
        stinger77
        • 2 Years Ago
        @lne937s
        Your exactly right. No union means flexibility and the foreign made domestic automakers will figure this out when UAW gets their money loving hands out of the picture!!!
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      Attention to all the morons here complaining about this because it doesn't bring jobs to the U.S. Nissan is a JAPANESE car manufacturer. The only people that should be complaining about this are people living in Japan. So please, stfu already.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        [blocked]
          blue
          • 2 Years Ago
          I believe you, Mexicans and the Japanese won't be complaining. And I know I'm not.
          Carlos Lopez magaÃÂ
          Renault owns 55% of Nissan and Nissan owns 40% of Renault, the CEO is from Brazil nad the shareholdder od Renaul are the almost the French Goverment, and from Nissan are Japanease people...and they choose Mexico because the salaries are 10 times lower than U.S. and the people works much time with the same quality
      gerardo_hernandez2
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hi I'm from mexico, and I know people who work in the automotive industry and the cause of many automakers put their factories in Mexico is very simple, it is much cheaper labor, so think, if you want cars made ​​in your s country in your country, would cost several thousand dollars more or that are made ​​in Mexico. the quality of cars made ​​in Mexico ee good. think, if it were not so would not export cars or to your country or to Europe or other places better than Mexico. 2 .- when I read your comments about immigrants and drugs makes me very angry, first, the war in Mexico is mainly caused by you, you are number 1 in drug consumption, so you think, if some day you consume drugs, feel responsible for thousands of deaths in Mexico and Latin America.
        whofan
        • 2 Years Ago
        @gerardo_hernandez2
        Well said! I hope the Mexican people get to enjoy the fruit of their labor. Drugs are everybodys problem. Supply and demand. One hand washes the other.
      Phendrix
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ah another day, another company setting up a manufacturing plant in Mexico...another opportunity for the small minded blowhards to come out of the woodwork. Let’s summarize what will go on and the usual responses: 1. More of our jobs going south..yada yada yada …curse NAFTA!…*gash teeth*…cheap Mexican labor!...blah blah! a) As much competitiveness as Detroit has regained, its still not profitable to make really small cars in the States, hence why in North America Nissan makes small cars in Mexico and the Titan in Mississippi. Ford and GM do the same thing. b) If they aren’t going to make them in Japan, and can’t make them profitably in the US would you prefer they make them in China or in Mexico!??! I Guarantee that a LOT of the parts in Mexican made cars come from US suppliers, this WILL create jobs in the US. c) Mexico is one of the biggest export markets for US goods, particularly cars and agricultural goods. Those new Mexican workers will go and spend their paychecks at a Walmart and buy Montana Beef and Washington Apples…and when they finally save up enough for pickup they’ll get a made in the USA Titan. That WOULDN’T happen if Nissan build the plant elsewhere. 2. Mexican Quality….BWahahahahah! Ford has proven that you can make a high quality product in Mexico, it is a question of corporate will. BMW has massively increased their sourcing from Mexico because their research indicated that the quality was up to their standards. 3 Dumbass generic joke about drugs and violence If you think Mexico is cartel central, then go Volunteer at your local DARE program or Lobby your Congressman/Senator to pass drug laws that deal with the reality of the obscenely huge US demand for drugs, and the fact that American citizens find it ridiculously easy to make a “killing” walking down to their local gun shops, buy 10 AK-47s and sell it to the Cartels. BTW, if Mexicans were arming Al-Queda that way the US outrage would have no end. 4. Mexicans…blah blah…illegals…they should just go back….hate hate hate. Most of you knuckleheads are the type that bitches about Mexico not doing enough to keep their people on their side of the border…guess what this is EXACTLY the type of job creation that will DO that…be HAPPY!
        axiomatik
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Phendrix
        GM is building the Sonic in the US. After GM and Chrysler's bankruptcies, they have reduced their costs to the point that they actually can profitably build small cars in the US. It also helps that they aren't building them as econo-penalty boxes anymore and charging higher prices for them.
          Phendrix
          • 2 Years Ago
          @axiomatik
          @axiomatik you are totally right about the Sonic...but I'd love to see the margin they are making on it. The Sonic is still the exception to the rule. But you know what? I don't really care, if GM can make it in the States and make money. Awesome. I just think people should open there minds and not think that every time a plant opens in Mexico it's some sort of affront to US sensibilities, rather than something that benefits North America as a whole.
      whofan
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hopefully the living standards improve in Mexico. They need to get drug violence under control. We have our share here in the States also. The industry in Mexico should be improving the life of it`s citizens? That would help curb illegal imigration in the US. Quality work comes off a Mexican line as well as American or Japanese lines. Engineering plays the major roll in quality. Quality control of assembly is the easy part. Most of my trouble with vehicles I can trace back to design and engineering. The hands that build play a lesser role.
      Elf
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'm not doing it....I'm not buying a car made in Mexico. I don't care what brand name it has attached to it. And I resent that it's not being made in America. I'm not racist, I have nothing against the Mexican people or government, but I'm mad as hell at the flow of jobs that have left this country - and I don't care if it's big business or the unions fault - and I'm not taking it lying down.
        Alex Rodriguez MacFa
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Elf
        "I'm mad as hell at the flow of jobs that have left this country" What does that have to do with this article? You can't lose something you never had. This new plant was never in the US and as far as I know the US still has a couple of assembly plants from Nissan, so why are you complaining? What do you think people from Wolfsburg felt when VW decided to go to Chattanooga? Or Munich people when BMW decided to go to South Carolina? or Stuttgart when M-Benz decided to go to Alabama? As they say....nothing personal.....strictly business!!
        Alex
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Elf
        Be mad at lazy people who consider themselves as "Americans", people who refuse to work (and rather be a parasite and abuse the federal social benefits related to unemployment) unless they have a $20/hour job with a full medical coverage for each body part for whole family and their pets and a full support from a "worker's union" parasites. THAT is the only thing you should be mad at, and to fix this issue you should simply buy products from whatever country you want to until the government will stop pointlessly wasting money on such lazy, overweight "citizens" and stop ANY kind of support for them (including the artificial creation of "local jobs").
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Elf
        [blocked]
        sfimports
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Elf
        Nissan is Japanese not American, if anything Japan lost the jobs. However you should know because you clearly don't, that Nissan has 3 manufacturing facilities in the USA, 2 of them make cars and the other makes the engines for the us made cars.
      Carlos Vargas
      • 2 Years Ago
      Why Mexico? America needs jobs too!
        Rationalthinker
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Carlos Vargas
        Why Mexico? Because a majority of the "B" platform cars that will be produced at this new facilty are destined for markets outside of the United Sates, mainly Latin America, and the overall cost of doing business in the United States is still far higher than in Mexico. Also, a plant built in Mexico will not be subject to future invasive and counterproductive regulations by Cass Sunstein (the worst of all Obama's appointees) if Obama wins reelection or the tactics that King and the UAW have in store for the current Nissan plant in Tennessee. Nissan is merely hedging their bets on a possible production interruption in the United States sometime in the not-so-distant future. VW and Mercedes are also looking to Mexico for these same reasons.
        Alex
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Carlos Vargas
        Why Mexico? Perhaps because factory workers there don't consider paying for their financed $200,000 house, leased cars for each family member, smartphones with an unlimited plan for each member, daily breakfast/lunch/dinners for whole family at restaurants (and so on) as a "physiological need"?
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      boomchakalaka
      • 2 Years Ago
      Enjoying NAFTA, yet, US?
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Alex Rodriguez MacFa
        • 2 Years Ago
        As much as your country demands for it.
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
          Phil Lupino
          • 2 Years Ago
          No, he means blow. Unless you mean bricks of bammer. You're looking in the wrong direction for herb. It should come to you from a northwesterly direction.
      KAG
      • 2 Years Ago
      Please No Nissan, I had a VW built in Mexico and the build quality is horrible.
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