The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away. So, apparently, do the world's automakers. At least, that is, when it comes to Le Mans. Case in point: the new Toyota TS030 Hybrid, the Le Mans prototype that the Japanese automaker has just revealed, mere days after Peugeot announced its departure from the endurance racing scene.

Shorthand for the third Toyota Sport prototype – following the TS010 and TS020 that challenged Le Mans in the '90s – the TS030 is the first LMP1 to employ a hybrid drivetrain. (Peugeot was experimenting with a similar system before shutting down its program, and Audi is rumored to be testing one as well, but has yet to announce it to the public.)

Toyota Hybrid System – Racing (THS-R) couples a 3.4-liter V8 to one of two potential electric motor setups: a front-mounted system developed by Aisin AW or a rear-mounted one from Denso. According to regulations, the electric boost can only drive one set of wheels, and Toyota has yet to decide which, although the 500kJ capacitor supplied by Nisshinbo is already a lock.

The carbon fiber chassis, meanwhile, was developed in-house by Toyota Motorsport GmbH in Cologne, Germany – the same outfit that ran the company's F1 team and has been looking for a new project ever since. The facility will serve as the team's headquarters as well, from which it will field one car in its debut at the Six Hours of Spa-Francorchamps – the second round of the inaugural FIA World Endurance Championship – on May 5. Toyota is planning to field a second car at Le Mans in June, but while the first car's driver roster is already confirmed, the team has yet to decide on its second line-up.

Follow the jump for the full press release and spec sheet, and check out the first batch of official images in the high-res gallery above.
Show full PR text
TOYOTA RACING UNVEILS 2012 LE MANS CHALLENGER

Toyota Racing today announced more details of its forthcoming FIA World Endurance Championship participation, including an intention to race two cars in specific races.

The new team, which is based at Toyota Motorsport GmbH (TMG) in Cologne, Germany, will make its race debut on 5 May in the Six Hours of Spa-Francorchamps, the second round of the FIA World Endurance Championship.

Toyota Racing intends to enter two TS030 HYBRID cars in the subsequent Le Mans 24 Hours (16-17 June. Participation in further rounds is yet to be confirmed.

A driver line-up of Alex Wurz, Nicolas Lapierre and Kazuki Nakajima has already been confirmed for one car while discussions are still ongoing to finalise the driver line-up for the other. Additionally, Andrea Caldarelli, from Pescara, Italy, has joined Toyota Racing as a junior driver.

The TS030 HYBRID is Toyota's successor to the iconic TS010 and TS020 cars which participated at Le Mans with podium success during the 1990s, with TS an acronym for ToyotaSport.

Toyota is the first manufacturer to confirm its participation in the FIA World Endurance Championship using a hybrid system, emphasising the pioneering approach to this technology which has seen more than 3.5 million Toyota hybrid vehicles sold worldwide.

The THS-R (Toyota Hybrid System – Racing) powertrain is designed to deliver maximum performance and features an all-new V8 3.4litre normally-aspirated petrol engine and hybrid system with capacitor storage developed by official team partner Nisshinbo.

The team will use the TS030 HYBRID's first test to evaluate the merits, within the current regulations, of a front motor system produced by Aisin AW and a rear motor system developed by official team partner DENSO. Those regulations limit hybrid systems to recovering a maximum of 500kJ between braking zones whilst restricting deployment to only two wheels.

A brand new carbon fibre LMP1 chassis has been developed and produced at TMG, where the complete car was assembled for the first time in preparation for a roll-out on 11-13 January at Paul Ricard.

During an exclusive test session at the French track, which included running in darkness, the TS030 HYBRID completed several hundred kilometres, showing an impressive level of reliability and performance for this very early stage in the car's testing programme.

Alex Wurz and Nicolas Lapierre both put the TS030 HYBRID through its paces at Paul Ricard, joined by 30-year-old Japanese driver Hiroaki Ishiura, who is a candidate to join the driver line-up at races where Toyota Racing participates with two cars.

Official partners to the Toyota Racing programme include ZENT, Aisin, Nippon Steel, Takata, Toyoda Gosei and Michelin.

Yoshiaki Kinoshita, Team President: "Of course we would love to win Le Mans; that is the dream for all competitors in this race. But we are realistic and we know we need to develop and to learn in order to compete with some very strong competition. Our target this year is to show the performance level of our car and particularly the THS-R powertrain. Hybrid is a core technology of Toyota so it is important to demonstrate this in a motorsport arena and we want to prove it can bring a performance advantage, both in terms of lap time and fuel efficiency. Everyone involved in designing, developing and preparing the car – both at TMG and at Motor Sport Division in Japan – has worked incredibly hard to reach this point and we are all very excited to be back on the race track again."

Pascal Vasselon, Technical Director: "The two main performance drivers of our TS030 HYBRID car are the aerodynamics and the hybrid system. The regulations for hybrid powertrains allow us to recover energy under braking and release this to improve acceleration out of a corner, delivering lap-time benefit. For any given performance level, a hybrid powertrain will achieve this with less fuel so it is an extremely relevant technology and one we are excited to be bringing to endurance racing. Another key point in our development phase has been delivering aerodynamic efficiency. The development team at TMG has worked very hard to achieve an optimum aero concept using our state-of-the-art aero development processes based on combined wind tunnel testing and CFD. Judging by the positive feedback we received during the roll-out we have a very good base on which to build in the coming weeks."

Hisatake Murata, Hybrid Project Leader: "Toyota has been working on hybrid systems for motorsport for several years, during which time we have made huge progress. Now we feel ready to bring our technology to the ultimate motorsport test: the Le Mans 24 Hours. Integrating a hybrid powertrain is, of course, a different challenge compared to a 'standard' powertrain. But we have worked together with partners such as DENSO, Aisin AW and Nisshinbo to develop the THS-R technology so it is part of the overall concept of the TS030 HYBRID. This technology will be used to recover up to 500kJ between braking events, energy which can be released via either front or rear motors to deliver a performance advantage. Toyota's hybrid technology has already won a 24-hour race – the Tokachi 24 Hours in 2007 – so now we are bringing the latest THS-R development to global motorsport; we know this is a technically-demanding exercise but we are well prepared for the challenge."

Alex Wurz: "It was cool to drive the TS030 HYBRID car for the first time. Just leaving the garage on the electric power is very futuristic, then when you let the clutch go and the internal combustion engine kicks in it is like an old friend has returned! When we put on the slick tyre I could feel the car generates a very good amount of grip so I think we have a good base and I think we can turn this into a really fast car. I am definitely very happy but my nature is to also be analytical and therefore I know there is still a lot of work to be done. It's really good to work with all the mechanics and engineers; the Toyota Racing team is very international and this works well. I am very comfortable in this team because they are all extremely professional, that is really clear."

Nicolas Lapierre: "My first impression from the roll-out was positive; the chassis is really advanced and the hybrid system works very well. The TS030 HYBRID car has good reaction to the steering with quick and efficient response combined with an impressive base level of downforce which is a nice feeling for a driver. It is totally different from anything I have known before because the philosophy is different. So our roll-out was promising and we saw the car's potential on several levels; we still have plenty of work to do but I think that we will have a strong package. We are starting from a blank page so the challenge is exciting."

Kazuki Nakajima: "I cannot wait to drive the TS030 HYBRID for the first time. I spoke a lot with Alex and Nicolas about the car during the roll-out and it obviously has great potential. I have been doing a lot of time in the TMG driving simulator so I have got to know the car in a virtual world, as well as the Le Mans track; now it's time to drive it for real. It is a great opportunity for me and I am thoroughly looking forward to the experience of racing in the FIA World Endurance Championship with Toyota Racing. To return to Le Mans with hybrid technology is a big challenge for Toyota but it is also a real opportunity for all the drivers and I hope my recent Super GT experience will be a benefit. It's a great feeling to be involved in this project and I am really motivated for this season."

Toyota TS030 Hybrid specifications


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 36 Comments
      Carphanatik
      • 2 Years Ago
      Here's hoping the headlights are strictly for the prototype and the final design will clean them up. Other than that, I can't wait to see this take on Audi. It's really a shame that Peugeot withdrew from the series. Would have been cool to see four marques going up against each other, that is if Aston Martin is still campaigning.
        AP1_S2K
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Carphanatik
        as for the headlights.... I leave that up to Audi (Germans) to come out with something that looks amazing
      Mindspin311
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cant wait to see this run at LM24 this year.
      LOLO
      • 2 Years Ago
      i love the way it looks its function over form. I like the lights sorry.
      jonnybimmer
      • 2 Years Ago
      I cant' wait to see this thing battle it out with Audi, I honestly might root for them just because as much as I like Audi, I'd rather see someone new win it this year. Besides, it's always great seeing a new competitor in the top tier of Le Mans, and a pretty good looking one too (except for those questionable headlights). I know there's a lot of people who can't see Toyota as a company that's serious about racing due to their rather uninspiring production cars, but like many other major automakers, they have a huge history in pretty much every racing series out there so this is nothing new for them. At any rate, when is it ever a bad thing when an automaker decides to invest heavily in racing?
      LOLO
      • 2 Years Ago
      The lights are throwback to the orginal toyotas too GT (ect)
      miketim1
      • 2 Years Ago
      yes.. yes YESSSSSSSSS. Welcome back :-)
      LEDfoot
      • 2 Years Ago
      So glad to see another major manufacturer step in now that Peugeot has bowed out of Le Mans. Though I am disappointed that Toyota isn't putting their money where their mouth is and bringing a battery hybrid. But then again I guess they realize too that a hybrid that uses batteries for energy storage just isn't going to be competitive. Enough people will be ignorant enough to think it's a "prius race car" to bolster prius' image I'm sure.
      sam
      • 2 Years Ago
      This Toyota is neither the first hybrid LMP1 or the first hybrid at Le Mans. The latter honor belongs to the Panoz Q9 that ran there and at the Petit Le Me Mans in 1998. http://green.autoblog.com/2009/02/16/1998-panoz-q9-a-hybrid-race-car-ahead-of-its-time/ The first P1 with a hybrid powertrain was campaigned by Corsa Motorsports in the American Le mans Series in 2009. http://greenfuelsforecast.com/ArticleDetails.php?articleID=710
      Dirty_Chicane
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hey Elmo! Look a car with doors, lights and a windscreen wiper that goes 200.
        Dirty_Chicane
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dirty_Chicane
        Great Elmo is 29 and loves NASCAR lives in elderly retirement land ( A.K.A. David Reutiman land ) and can argue as well as a politician off fact ! You tuned all of my arguments away from point and went into left field only to look foolish. You name yourself after a child's toy and can argue a point about as well.
          Elmo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dirty_Chicane
          Off point? Where did I go off point? Your first argument was that you thought NASCAR race cars should look more like their production counterparts. Your second argument then went onto you talking about how they don't have windshield wipers, head/tail lights, and doors. I proved you wrong on many occasions on why they don't have any of those. Then you moved onto bringing up 70s and 80s era NASCAR race cars going over 200mph with headlights. Yet, I proved you wrong there, also. I even proved you wrong BEFORE you even thought about bringing up that 60s NASCAR race cars had headlights, when they didn't as shown above. So where I'm moving away from your original argument? Oh wait, are you just stalling because you don't wanna admit you were wrong? By the way, all of Florida isn't a retirement community. Tampa is FAR from being a retirement city in Florida. Ah I see now. You are M. The manner in the way you post is exactly the way he posts. He even starts talking to this invisible audience saying stuff about me. So Justin is right. You do have multiple accounts on this website, which is quite pathetic.
        Dirty_Chicane
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dirty_Chicane
        You are either Unemployed or live with your mother to respond this much in a day I took off!
        Dirty_Chicane
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dirty_Chicane
        Elmo.....I lived I'm MiamI for 5 years Europe for 4 and own my own automotive business so please sit down and shut it!!!!
          Elmo
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dirty_Chicane
          LMAO Now you're going to start lying about who you really are while spewing immature insults just because you were proven wrong and made to look stupid. Awesome.
        Elmo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dirty_Chicane
        Your argument is that NASCAR doesn't run factory cars. This is a prototype, meant to be a car to advance technology for their production models.
          Dirty_Chicane
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Elmo
          You are a little daft and can't really understand my argument or comment on my point. You did say today that doors aren't safe for crashes at 200 ( ask Mike Rockendeller about that one ) and try keeping a windscreen wiper on at 200 mph. You said all the lexan and glass on track would be murder, but don't remember the 70's-80's where they went 180-200 with lights and no stickers and did it with a complete lack of murder.
        Elmo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dirty_Chicane
        Your argument was that NASCAR doesn't run factory cars. That is your main argument. You've now moved onto trying to justify you being wrong. Do you see a COMPLETE design difference between both this and a NASCAR race car? An LMP has a FULL 2 feet of a crumple zone (made out of strong as steel carbon composite mind you) before it hits the door. How is NASCAR supposed to make a car look like its production counterpart while giving it an incredibly giant crumple zone before the door? Like I said in the other article, you'll be seeing bunches of other prototypes with a windshield lifting off the windshield at over 200mph at Le Mans. It's not as uncommon as you think. In the late 60s and 70s era of NASCAR, you might remember that the lights were either taped up or replaced by a circular piece of sheet metal that fit in the headlight's spot. The 80s era shouldn't even be apart of this argument much for the same reason. That's when the cars started pulling away from showroom stock. So my question would be... Why put headlights on the cars when all they're going to do is just cover them up to keep them from shattering all over the place since that's what they did back in the 60s and 70s? Oh and the only time NASCAR race cars ever went 200mph in the 60s and 70s was when the Daytona/Superbird came in, and those had flip-up headlights.
          Dirty_Chicane
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Elmo
          Don't tell me what my argument is because you aren't able to comprehend EnglIsh. Also I can prove all your facts wrong and make you look lIke the NASCAR joke of a fan you are. You must be 15 and need to go to bed by now ?
        Dirty_Chicane
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Dirty_Chicane
        I said 70's - 80's and Awese Bill from Dawsonvillle went 212.809 in 1987 at Talladega.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Lachmund
      • 2 Years Ago
      AUDI....please do a diesel hybrid!
      Krishan Mistry
      • 2 Years Ago
      The headlights look ugly, like they are on upside down. But other than that, this looks fantastic! And the hybrid tech looks interesting, it looks like it would not only make this car faster, but also easier to get moving from a rest. You can simply putter around on electric, then off the clutch, V8 ready to move. Still think Audi will have the edge by combining electric with their already super potent turbodiesel.
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