Americans are driving their vehicles longer, as the average age of vehicles has nearly hit 11 years, according to a new study by Polk. Blame a wretched economy and more reliable modern automobiles, but cars and trucks continue to stay on the road much longer than they did 15 years ago, when the average age was just 8.4 years.

According to a report in The Detroit News, there are other reasons for the change, including a decline in the number of miles driven last year and improved resistance to rust and corrosion. Regardless of the reason for the record-setting age of our American fleet, the news has the auto industry salivating at the prospect of boom times ahead. The National Automobile Dealers Association is predicting that new vehicle sales this year will hit 13.9 million.

"The economy, unemployment are still going to be stubborn, but there's so much pent-up demand I think the industry is going to have an awesome year," Toyota President and CEO Jim Lentz told the Detroit News.

How old is your ride? We know that Autoblog readers have more cars than the average consumer, so join our poll below by answering how old your daily driver is.


How old is your daily driver?
Less than one year old 2365 (6.3%)
Between one and three years old 3695 (9.8%)
Between three and five years old 4021 (10.7%)
Between five and seven years old 5124 (13.6%)
Between seven and 10 years old 6102 (16.2%)
Between 10 and 15 years old 9728 (25.8%)
Between 15 and 20 years old 3626 (9.6%)
More than 20 years old 2595 (6.9%)
I don't own a car or truck 462 (1.2%)


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 257 Comments
      chuckgoolsbee
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is entirely to do with the medieval new car buying process and how massively annoying it is. New car Dealers: You've done this to yourselves! No other consumer commodity purchase hides the price from you and makes you negotiate to find it. I can easily comparison shop EVERYTHING else I buy. Cars? Forget about it.
      bobmarley
      • 3 Years Ago
      200k mi is the new 100k mi.
        neonrt
        • 3 Years Ago
        @bobmarley
        Exactly, this is why I think the Automakers who are expecting a big boom is sales might be off the mark. Cars are lasting longer. With the economy the way it is people are not going to go out and get a new car unless the absolutely have to.
        NightFlight
        • 3 Years Ago
        @bobmarley
        Without a doubt it is. A vehicle making it to 100K really isn't any big deal anymore.
      NightFlight
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why in the hell is everyone who says they have a foreign vehicle being downrated? Seriously, being downrated just because you don't own an American vehicle? There are some seriously moronic xenophobes on this website.
      ramairjer
      • 3 Years Ago
      Frightening stat considering cash for clunkers took a lot of old cars off the road. It is ugly out there what with the economy, jobs/pay, etc.
      Cruising
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've had to drop around $1000-2000 worth of maintenance over the past couple years in my 1995 Maxima with 270k but in the end I still have reliable transportation that gets me 29 mpg and it has never left me stranded. I would love to buy a new 30k dollar Maxima but in the end it is still cheaper to maintain my old workhorse.
        chris
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Cruising
        Far cheaper. $2000 over two years, or a new car loan of $600+ per month ($14,400 over two years)? It really is smarter to maintain a paid-off car if you don't mind not keeping up with the Joneses.
        Mondrell
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Cruising
        Ditto. I wanted to move back into a manual transmission car by way of a '07-'08 Acura TL Type-S, and was actively pursuing one during the holiday season. I'm in the final months of paying for my '03 CL Type-S, but even with dealer lowballing, they were going to give me 5 grand for a car I owe 2 on. I'd be shelling out less for payments, and the Gen 3 TL's track record suggests that like the CL, I'd get a good five years before needing to look into any major servicing. Yet the more I thought about it, the more I felt the inclination to get back into the debt grind slip. The car still has a lot of life left. And I have other things I'd like to get into. . .things that would benefit from me saving rather than servicing debt. And while I like late-model cars as much as the next person, I've admittedly aspired to being one of those guys whose 'old' ride timelessly outlasts the 3 or 4 the Joneses' buy over the same period.
      D. Thompson
      • 3 Years Ago
      I drive a 1960 Studebaker 4door Lark V8, as a daily driver. It gets between 18 to 22 mpg. I do have to run hi-test, it was designed for 90 octane gas. But, it is paid for, and the insurance is under a 100 dollars a year.
      Freimuth
      • 3 Years Ago
      1999 Grand Prix GTP here with 228k miles and counting....
      Deb
      • 3 Years Ago
      83 Mustang
      Robert Fahey
      • 3 Years Ago
      Many folks are currently FORCED to keep what they have because of negative equity and bad credit. Residual damage from the recession.
      Mr. Bear
      • 3 Years Ago
      I drive a 22 year old Toyota Camry that looks like new. I often wonder about people who say they are tetting a new car. When I ask them what is wrong with the one they have, they say nothing, it runs like new. If it runs like new and nothing is wrong with it you have more money than you know what to do with.
      RichR
      • 3 Years Ago
      My car's 33 yrs. 1978 Buick Skylark. I drive this girl everywhere. all original nothing chromed or new in the car all original.
      bkappell
      • 3 Years Ago
      i have a 98 buick very dependable
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