• Jan 17, 2012
Nissan has been working on its self-healing clearcoat technology called Scratch Shield for more than seven years. While it's been applied to the company's cars for four years now, it's first non-automotive application is here: an iPhone case.
Called the Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case, it appears aimed at the doubly-retentive types who not only don't like their phone getting scratched, but also don't even like their cases to show any wear. The healing finish is applied to an ABS-plastic case, so that the case protects the smartphone and the Scratch Shield protects the case. Nissan claims another benefit is that the glossy finish is easier to grip.

It's in beta-trial now, but if real-world testing brings accolades it could go on sale later this year – hopefully with some more subtle choices of branding.
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WORLD'S FIRST SELF-HEALING iPHONE CASE
Nissan brings automotive innovation to the world of technology

- Nissan announces unique self-healing iPhone case - the Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case
- The case uses innovations from the automotive world to create a robust iPhone case, including Nissan's pioneering self-healing paint finish
- Nissan's Scratch Shield paint is a world first in paint technology that allows fine scratches to quickly mend themselves
- Addition benefits such as scratch-resistant and easier-to-grip than normal glossy phone surfaces
- The Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case is made from ABS plastic - a high grade substance widely used in the automotive industry to create a more rigid, robust, and tighter-fitting case
- Trail underway with initial batch of prototypes


(16/01/12 ) -- Nissan today announced the latest piece of must-have kit for the iPhone* - a ground-breaking self-healing iPhone case. The Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case features the brand's pioneering self-healing paint finish, a world first in paint technology developed in 2005 and already used on a number of Nissan and Infiniti models. Now this ground-breaking technology has been applied to a product that's prone to scratches through everyday use - the smartphone - with Nissan's new Scratch Shield case meaning iPhone-lovers can keep their phone looking at its best for longer.

Developed by Nissan in collaboration with University of Tokyo and Advanced Softmaterials Inc., the unique Scratch Shield paint finish was initially designed for automotive use and is available on the Nissan Murano, 370Z and X-Trail along with the Infiniti range of products. Now, thanks to Nissan's pioneering approach, this technology is being trialled for the first time on a non-automotive product in Europe, with the Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case.

The Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case has been designed using several automotive engineering innovations to deliver a more durable and long-lasting paint coat, and closely fitting, tight case. The case has three key benefits: the highly flexible and elastic properties of Scratch Shield paint technology allows fine scratches to quickly mend themselves**; its tactile gel-like rather than glossy surface is more scratch-resistant than conventional paint and provides a better grip; and the case itself is made of ABS plastic - a high grade substance widely used in the automotive industry which is more rigid and robust than other plastics. The outer 'paint' is made from polyrotaxane, which means that when damage occurs to the coating in the form of a fine scratch, the chemical structure is able to react to change back to its original shape and fill the gap - 'healing' the blemish.

An initial batch of prototypes of the innovative Scratch Shield iPhone cases has been produced by Nissan for BETA testing with selected journalists and customers, but if demand proves strong, it will look to put the cases on general sale later this year.

Bob Laishley, Overseas Programme Director Business Development for Nissan in Europe, said: "We like to think laterally by taking the great innovations we've got from an automotive point of view, and looking at how they could be applied to improve everyday issues. The Scratch Shield iPhone case is a great example of us taking a Nissan automotive technology that has had a huge impact for our customers, and then shifting the boundaries to apply it to another everyday product.

"We're really excited about the possibilities provided by this technology. In Japan, we've already linked up with world-leading mobile operator NTT DoCoMo to allow them to use the Scratch Shield technology on its Style Series N-03B mobile phones, and we think this technology has real scope beyond the automotive world. We're passionate about innovations that get people excited, and that means not being restricted to one industry or genre."

Nissan has been licensing its unique technologies for various non-automotive applications since 2004. Other technologies that have been licensed include its Miniature Thermal Imaging Sensor: initially designed to make driving at night safer by detecting the presence of people even in places not illuminated by the car's headlights; the technology has been licensed to create a device which allows customers to monitor heat generation, or collect temperature readings via infrared sensor. Nissan will continue to research and develop breakthrough technologies that can benefit other industries, and promote these non-automotive applications globally.

Nissan has long been an innovator when it comes to advancements in the automotive world, heralding the start of a remarkable new era in motoring when it launched the first Crossover, the Nissan Murano, followed by the hugely-successful Qashqai and recently joined by the Juke - with its innovative fusion of compact SUV and sports car styling. Nissan's range of crossovers has since gone from strength to strength, with the Nissan Qashqai selling more than a quarter of a million models last year in Europe and the newly launched Juke having now notched-up 120 thousand sales. Built in Nissan's manufacturing plant in the UK, these two models helped the plant break its all-time production record to build 480 thousand units in 2011.

Currently the Nissan Juke-R, another Nissan Innovation combining the transmission, drive train and engine of a Nissan GT-R with a Juke, is being put to the test on the streets of Dubai. To celebrate this event, Nissan has joined forces with Ministry of Sound, who will be hosting a pre-race party for Nissan with internationally renowned DJ Pete Tong, to release the first 100 of the Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case prototypes.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      Timothy Tibbetts
      • 2 Years Ago
      No scratches would be great but what happens if you drop it? Looks pretty slim and any really protective cases like the Otter Box and Lifeproof add a lot of bulk.
        Gorgenapper
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Timothy Tibbetts
        Otterbox Commuter. Not nearly as much bulk as the Defender but is still pretty durable nonetheless.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        ravenosa
        • 2 Years Ago
        I've still got the same Mac running Logic in my recording studio, same iPod touch as my portable synth. Working fine, no tin foil hats or yearly iterations needed...
        Gorgenapper
        • 2 Years Ago
        When my contract is up, I'm switching to whichever version of the Galaxy that Samsung will have out by then. Galaxy S5 or something.
      stclair5211
      • 2 Years Ago
      And how much is it??? I put it at "complete waste of $$$" myself.
      ERNSTEVERYTHING
      • 2 Years Ago
      shame the self healing compound, can't fix the horrendously designed Juke..
        stclair5211
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ERNSTEVERYTHING
        The juke is perfect. Finally some real design out of nissan.
        Bill
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ERNSTEVERYTHING
        I know. If it had desent mpg I would buy. Not too many nissans encourage design inovation like the juke and the quest.
      somedude
      • 2 Years Ago
      Apple's soon gonna sue in 3...... 2..... 1...
        departo
        • 2 Years Ago
        @somedude
        Umm are you serious? Why would Apple sue? Last I checked it wasn't illegal or anything to make an iPhone case.
      Toujou
      • 2 Years Ago
      This a great way to maxima-ize durability and make the Altimate phone case. Certainly they will now release an armada of mobile accessories as they turn over a new leaf for their business. Being a pathfinder in a new industry isn't easy, but I Nissan's really showing their Versa-tility here. Good luck to nissan as they make their move to become a gadget accessory titan while they Juke competitors with new technology. Sorry I couldn't get the rest of them in there.
      departo
      • 2 Years Ago
      The real question here is simply why? Why would someone want an aftermarket case using this technology? What benefit is there? Perhaps if the technology was applied to the phone itself, then it might be worth something. If I wanted a case this thin made out of abs plastic, I'd just pick up a Case-Mate Barely There case for less then $20.
      4gasem
      • 2 Years Ago
      Hope it works better than the sealing paint on their cars...
      intellerv
      • 2 Years Ago
      actually Nissan stopped putting ScratchShield on their cars because the cost to repaint in an accident was raising insurance premiums. The clearcoat that does the actual healing costs 4 times as more per gallon as regular clear.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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