• Jan 15, 2012
The unfortunate reality of a post-JFK, post-9/11 America means that our president needs to be hidden away from public view, and the details of his high-security transportation are just as hidden. But there was a time when the leader of the free world was paraded around for all to see, and for three presidents of these United States, this was the car in which they met their constituents.

Nicknamed the Queen Mary, this 1938 Cadillac V-16 President Convertible Parade Limousine was one of only two specially made for the White House (the other dubbed Queen Elizabeth), and was used by FDR, Truman and Eisenhower during their presidencies. Delivered on special order shortly after the introduction of Cadillac's second-generation sixteen-cylinder engine (which was smaller and lighter than its predecessor but delivered the same output), the Presidential Limousine's 165-inch wheelbase made it eleven inches longer than the already gargantuan production model.

After the end of WWII, as part of its routine maintenance, Cadillac replaced the sixteen-cylinder engines with V8s that were both more economical and easier to maintain. The cars were last used by President Eisenhower during his re-election campaign, after which longtime Cadillac dealer Jack Tallman, who witnessed the pair being rebuilt several times while visiting the factory, was offered the chance to purchase both cars. Tallman selected the Queen Mary for his collection, where it stayed for four decades. In 1999, the car was sold to one Al Wiseman, who showed it at Amelia Island in 2002 where it was awarded as the best original, unrestored vehicle.

It is now being offered for auction by the estate of John O'Quinn, its last owner, at the upcoming RM Auctions event in Arizona next week, where it is expected to fetch between $300,000 and $400,000. Have a closer look in the high-res image gallery and the detailed listing after the jump.
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Lot 132 - 1938 Cadillac V-16 Presidential Convertible Parade Limousine

Estimate:
$300,000-$400,000 US
Est. 210 bhp, 331 cu. in. overhead valve V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 165"

• "The Queen Mary," ex-Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Dwight Eisenhower
• Three documented private owners since 1956
• One of two specially built limousines for White House use
• Trim no. SO ("Special Order") 2644
• Formerly in the Tallman Collection for four decades

The story of this remarkable and extraordinary Cadillac begins in 1938. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was halfway through his second of four presidential terms, and the turmoil in continental Europe was on the verge of escalating into World War. Much of FDR's first six years in office were characterized by his New Deal recovery programs following the Great Depression and the isolationist policy that would eventually have to be abandoned in favor of full-scale involvement in the Allied war effort.

It was in this climate that Cadillac and its coachworks Fleetwood were charged in 1938 with special order 9006: two virtually identical 16-cylinder open limousines to be constructed on a massive, stretched 165-inch wheelbase (11 inches longer than a standard V-16 Cadillac!) and delivered to the White House for use by President Roosevelt.

Cadillac's second-generation V-16 had just been introduced. While the first generation 16 and its V-12 stable-mate had been 45-degree overhead valve designs, the new engine was a 135-degree L-head, developing 135 hp from 431 cubic inches. Each bank had its own distributor, carburetor and manifolds. The engine was six inches shorter, 13 inches lower and 250 pounds lighter than its overhead valve predecessor and had significantly fewer parts. Nevertheless, it developed the same power despite its smaller displacement.

Sharing chassis and bodies with the V-8-engined Series 75, the Series 90 Sixteen was offered in 14 body styles, all by Fleetwood, Cadillac's in-house coachbuilding company. This sharing was enabled by the compact dimensions of the engine, which could be tucked under the firewall, permitting a shorter car without loss of interior space. Its styling was the work of William J. Mitchell, the young designer who had penned the dramatic Sixty Special.

Both the 9006 cars built for use by the White House, chassis 5270064 and 5270075 (the car presented here), were reportedly built with armor-plating and weighed in at a massive 8,000 lbs. Furthermore, they were equipped with special running boards, grab handles, communication equipment, special compartments for firearm storage, sirens and lights to accommodate their Presidential duties.

Leased by Cadillac to the U.S. government, both cars were used through 1956 as part of the White House fleet to carry Secret Service agents or directly chauffeur the President. One was nicknamed the "Queen Mary" (this car, chassis 5720075) and the other "Queen Elizabeth," a lighthearted reference to the large cruise ships of the same name. Period photos clearly show President Roosevelt being chauffeured in one of the two cars. Roosevelt also had the Ford "Sunshine Special" at his disposal, and the "Queens" were instrumental in transporting agents in his motorcade.

Following FDR's death, the "Queens" were enlisted for use by the Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower administrations as well. Truman took delivery of two Lincoln "Bubbletop" Limousines in 1950, but both Cadillacs remained in the official fleet.

Over the course of their use by the government, they were returned to Cadillac from time to time to be updated and rebuilt as necessary. In 1946, following the end of WWII, the V-16 engines were replaced with L-head V-8s, which in turn were replaced by 331-cubic inch OHV V-8s in 1952. The Queen Mary still retains its OHV V-8 that was installed in the early 1950s.

TALLMAN COLLECTION

Following its use by the White House, the Queen Mary was purchased directly from Cadillac by Mr. Jack Tallman, a third-generation Cadillac dealer from Decatur, Illinois. RM Auctions spoke with Mr. Tallman prior to his recent passing, and he recalled having fond memories of his ownership of this car. He remembered visiting the factory as a young boy with his father, who was also a Cadillac dealer, and seeing both '38 Presidential Cadillacs being worked on from time to time. It was his hope as a young man to buy one, if not both, of these cars.

According to Mr. Tallman, every few years, the cars were brought back to Cadillac, the bodies were removed, and the chassis and running gear were thoroughly gone over. He witnessed this work being carried out at the factory on more than one occasion. Given postwar supply shortages, V-16 engines were not only costly but quite difficult to rebuild, and Mr. Tallman suggested this was the initial reason for the installation of the flathead V-8.

In the early 1950s, this flathead was replaced by an OHV V-8, which also achieved better fuel mileage. Once the opportunity to buy one of these Presidential Cadillacs presented itself in 1956, Mr. Tallman inspected both cars and chose the Queen Mary, which he deemed to be in better condition and lower mileage than the Queen Elizabeth. In fact, Cadillac asked if he wanted to purchase both cars, but he already owned several collector cars and simply did not have the storage.

Prior to his acquisition, the car was used through the re-election in November 1956 of President Eisenhower. Immediately thereafter and following his acquisition of the car, Mr. Tallman had it photographed on the street directly in front of the White House.

The Tallman family owned the car for over four decades, putting about 30,000 to 40,000 miles on the odometer. It was driven to various meetings and events and participated in many VMCCA, AACA and CCCA tours, the badges of which are still visible in the passenger compartment and on the front bumper. By this time, Mr. Tallman had also acquired one of the 1956 Cadillac Presidential Limousines, both of which were favorites at family events as the entire family, children included, participated in the tours.

The engine was overhauled in his ownership, and selective restoration work was conducted, namely to the interior. The badly deteriorated leather upholstery was replaced with vinyl to replicate the original and was originally intended to complement the Midnight Blue finish of the car, a color combination that reflected the Presidential Seal. Since that time, the car has been refinished in limousine-appropriate black and is distinguishable from its sister car by virtue of this color change.

SUBSEQUENT HISTORY

In May 1999 Mr. Tallman brought the car to auction in Indiana where it was acquired by Mr. Al Wiseman, an aviation engineer, entrepreneur and prolific car collector in his own right, who added the Queen Mary to his sizable collection in Tarpon Springs, Florida.

In 2002 it was shown at the famed Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance, where it was given the award for the best original and unrestored automobile. It is now offered from the Estate of John O'Quinn. It is complete with replica pistols and rifles, as well as two telephones, gun holsters, fender-mounted red siren, step plates, grab-handles and such smaller interesting details as an original 1956 District of Columbia registration sticker affixed to the windshield.

U.S. Presidential limousines have contributed enormously not only to American history but to the greater automotive narrative as a whole, beginning in 1909, when an automobile first entered the White House stables. Symbols of American military and political power and the importance of the Executive Branch, they are viewed in all their glory by adoring crowds from Inauguration Day and through the rest of a President's term, as he is driven to and from speaking engagements, rallies and the like.

Unlike their successors, which were flown to their destinations, the Queens Mary and Elizabeth were driven across the country to meet the President as he arrived by airplane. This accounts not only for their substantial original mileage but also the replacement of the engines.

The Queen Mary, in particular, was initially chosen by Mr. Tallman for its superior condition and lower mileage and has had only three private owners since 1956. Its history is impeccable and known from new. It lived through the Second World War, Korean War and three extremely important American presidencies, as the nation was ushered from a state of international war to one of its most prosperous decades in years. Moreover, as Cadillacs, they have contributed to the marque's long and storied relationship with the Executive Branch. Countless presidents, from Kennedy to Nixon, Clinton, Bush and Obama have relied on armored Cadillac transportation.

5270075 is also very well documented, with original photography and numerous published articles, from the Cadillac LaSalle Club's Self Starter magazine (September 2005) to the famous book 80 Years of Cadillac LaSalle and the documentary The World at War. They have even been immortalized in 1:24 scale replicas. 5270075 comes with a sizable binder that contains everything from original titles to documentation from Tallman's ownership.

In the greater group of motor cars with presidential provenance, the "Queen Mary" is undoubtedly one of the most desirable and historically significant.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 34 Comments
      Travis C. Vasconcelo
      • 2 Years Ago
      What a beautiful piece of American History. You'd think a car like this would be int he Smithsonian!
        Jim
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Travis C. Vasconcelo
        It is beautiful, no doubt about it.
      Dave
      • 2 Years Ago
      "The unfortunate reality of a post-JFK, post-9/11 America means that our president needs to be hidden away from public view....." JFK's assassination and 9/11 were not unprecedented events. Decades before FDR, Truman, and Eisenhower paraded around in this car, Lincoln (1865), Garfield(1881), and McKinley(1901) had all been assassinated. In fact, there were assassination attempts on both FDR and Truman: http://digital.library.miami.edu/gov/FDRAssn.html http://www.historynet.com/president-harry-s-truman-survived-assassination-attempt-at-the-blair-house.htm
      IBx27
      • 2 Years Ago
      Man, I wish I could listen to a V16...
        BG
        • 2 Years Ago
        @IBx27
        I rode in one owned by an old gent in 1971, in Rock Island. The engine was totally silent, and it had so much torque, once he was in third gear, he did not need to downshift as long as he was moving more than about 5 mph. The transmission was three on the tree. The passenger compartment had a smoking kit on the gent's side and a vanity mirror with light on the lady's side. In the trunk was a huge AM radio box containing vacuum tubes
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        ابوذر ڀرڳڙي
        • 2 Years Ago
        Why should it belong to the people? If someone pays for it... it belongs to them. If the people want to get together and pay up for this car then, yes, it will belong to the people.
      Raymond
      • 2 Years Ago
      X3 this should be in a museum and not a private collection.
        letstakeawalk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Raymond
        The sad reality is that museums can't afford to take care of everything with think is important. Museums have a limited amount of space, and a limited budget. As long as it goes to a private owner who understands its importance (which they no doubt will), the car will most likely receive better care than it would sitting in a museum collection. The owner also still has the option to loan the car for display - indeed that is a very common situation in many museums. A good curator will reach out to the owner of an important piece for a temporary loan of the object, and save his acquisition budget for the items that the general public might not think are worthy of saving - those are the treasures that end up being lost as they fall through the cracks when no one thinks they're worth saving...
      Avinash Machado
      • 2 Years Ago
      Gorgeous car.
      Jon Smith
      • 2 Years Ago
      i restore old cars like this at work... they are quite some pieces of art, the cars from the 30s have a lot of style
      2056778180
      • 2 Years Ago
      http://www.car-nection.com/yann/Dbas_txt/V6389006.htm Cadillac historian Yann Saunders on this car.
        veesixteenmadamex
        • 2 Years Ago
        @2056778180
        Just a note to say that the above URL is out of date and is being used here without authorisation. Here is the correct (updated) page: http://www.cadillacdatabase.org/Dbas_txt/V6389006.htm
      artandcolour2010
      • 2 Years Ago
      I agree with Travis, below. This car is part of our history, and should be in a public museum. Maybe the second one is? And a word about these V16s: The first V16, 1930-37 was a completely modern narrow angle (45°) OHV V16. The second generation, 1938-40, was a more "archaic" L-head, or flathead design with 135° angle, but was as the writer pointed out, smaller and lighter but just as powerful. By some reports it was a smoother engine too. The original engine was a work of art to look at. It featured chrome and polished alloys as well as black porcelainized materials. It also "hid" the spark plug wiring in tubes for a highly finished look. The second generation was "cheaper" to produce, too, but that's a relative term when describing a V16, lol.
      caddy-v
      • 2 Years Ago
      Roosevelt's most notable limo, the Sunshine special was a `39 Lincoln on display at the Henry Ford museum. Also at the museum is Kennedy's, Ikes and Reagans limo along with Teddy Roosevelts horse drawn buggy. It's a good bet that Obama's limo will also be put on display once he's booted from office a year from now, but you'll have to travel to the International Clown Hall of Fame in Baraboo Wisconsin to see it.
        caddy-v
        • 2 Years Ago
        @caddy-v
        I might add, after Pearl Harbor the secret service pressed into service Al Capone's armored Cadillac for the President. It was confiscated earlier when Capone went down.
        Nick Stürtz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @caddy-v
        Keep the political bullshit off this blog, we get enough of that crap everywhere else, let's have one place where we don't have to hear it.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @caddy-v
        [blocked]
          caddy-v
          • 2 Years Ago
          It's the same script the DUMBocrats wrote in 08. Hillary against Obama and they fought far worse than whats happening now. As far as Obama sitting back and letting things happen, that's all he's done for the last three years. When all is said and done, whoever the Repubs settle on will be a dramatic improvement over this Clown in Chief.
        IBx27
        • 2 Years Ago
        @caddy-v
        Upvoted!
      carfan
      • 2 Years Ago
      this is exactly what these wanna be POS asian cars will NEVER have: a rich HISTORY that dates back 100 or more years. The real big names today are still the ones that were big names in the past : Mercedes, BMW, Cadillac, Buick, RR, not lexus or toyota or hyundai
        caddy-v
        • 2 Years Ago
        @carfan
        You left out my all time car of passion, the Duesenburg.
          kontroll
          • 2 Years Ago
          @caddy-v
          unfortunately it's not in existence today...what a shame
        Spellchecker
        • 2 Years Ago
        @carfan
        Completely agree with Carfan. When I am purchasing a car from a luxury brand - the brand better stand for something and have the history and heritage to make it special.
      mbukukanyau
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cadillac needs to bring back that hood ornament, but to bring it back, they need a Sedan worthy of it.
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