A plethora of new diesel offerings is driving sales, according to a new report from the Diesel Technology Forum. Sales of diesels rose 27.4 percent in 2011, according to numbers from HybridCars.com and market researchers Baum and Associates.

The Diesel Technology Forum pegs the overall market growth in 2011 at 10.2 percent, putting diesels' increase considerably ahead of the curve. Interestingly enough, the group says hybrid sales were down 2.2 percent. The non-profit coalition of diesel engine and technology companies includes such auto industry heavyweights as Chrysler, Daimler, Ford, General Motors, Mazda and Volkswagen.

Diesel sales are expected to grow to over six percent of the U.S. market by 2015, according to the report, and could reach as high as 7.4 percent by 2017, as more diesel models hit the market. Diesel-powered versions of the Jeep Grand Cherokee, Cadillac ATS, Porsche Cayenne, Chevrolet Cruze and Mercedes-Benz S-Class are slated for near-term U.S. release, according to the group.

To read the entire release, click past the jump.
Show full PR text
January 10, 2012

U.S. Clean Diesel Auto Sales Soar To 27 Percent Increase In 2011
Consumer Confidence in New Generation of Clean Diesels and New Fuel Efficiency Standards In U.S to Drive Future Growth


Washington, D.C. – The sales of new clean diesel automobiles in the U.S. increased by an impressive 27.4 percent in 2011 over 2010, according to updated sales information compiled by HybridCars.Com and the market research firm Baum and Associates.

"Without a doubt, 2011 was a key year for the industry's effort to reestablish clean diesel automobiles in the United States," said Allen Schaeffer, the Executive Director of the Diesel Technology Forum.

"This 27 percent increase in annual sales is a strong sign that American drivers are understanding the benefits of new clean diesel technology in terms of better fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. I fully expected clean diesel auto sales to increase further as several new diesel cars enter the U.S. market in the next couple of years.

"The new federal fuel efficiency standards that will required a 54.5 mpg average by 2025 will also boost clean diesel auto sales, as diesel cars are 20 to 40 more fuel efficient than gasoline versions," Schaeffer said. "

2011 Clean Diesel, Hybrid and Overall Market Sales By Month

The HybridCars.Com and Baum and Associates sales summary showed that clean diesel auto sales increased 27.4 percent in 2011 compared to the overall market's increase of 10.2 percent.

Month (2011 v. 2010) Clean Diesel +/- Hybrids +/- Overall Market +/-

Dec. 2011 +16.2 +8.7%

Nov. 2011 +0.7 +14.0%

Oct. 2011 +0.7) +7.5%

Sept. 2011 (-5.1) (-20.6

Aug. 2011 +20.4) +7.5%

July 2011 +43.7) +0.9%

June 2011 +25.7) +7.1%

May 2011 +33.8) (-3.9%)

April 2011 +42.2 +17.7%

March 2011 +36.3 +16.8%

February 2011 +37.5 +27.2%

January 2011 +59.5 +17.2%

2011 Totals +27.4) +10.2%

New Clean Diesel Automobiles Bound For the U.S. Market

Announced This Week At North American International Auto Show

Chrysler this week at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit announced that it will be introducing a Jeep Grand Cherokee diesel in 2013 or 2014, and possibly other Jeep diesels later;
General Motors announced that a diesel version of the Cadillac ATS would available in the U.S. in the near future;
It was also announced that a diesel powered Porsche Cayenne would be coming to the U.S. in 2012.

In addition, major clean diesel announcements made prior to the Detroit show include:
  • A diesel version of the hot-selling Chevrolet Cruze will begin sales in the U.S. in 2013
  • Mazda will become the first Asian car manufacturer to sell diesel cars in the U.S. when it introduces its SKYACTIV-D 2.2-liter clean diesel engine here
  • The S350 BlueTEC marks the return of the diesel-powered Mercedes-Benz S-Class to the United States in 2012 after a 17-year absence
  • The Volkswagen Passat, which was recently named the Motor Trend 2012 Car of the Year, began production of the Passat diesel in its new Chattanooga, TN plant in the summer of 2011.
"While most auto makers have clean diesel autos on the market in Europe, Asia and Australia, there are growing indications that even more diesels are on their way to the U.S. market," Schaeffer said.

By 2015, Baum and Associates expects diesel car sales to grow to 6.0 to 6.5 percent of the entire U.S. market, compared to just over 3.0 percent today. The research firm J.D. Power & Associates sees the U.S. diesel market share growing steadily to 7.4 percent by 2017.

ABOUT THE DIESEL TECHNOLOGY FORUM

The Diesel Technology Forum is a non-profit national organization dedicated to raising awareness about the importance of diesel engines, fuel and technology. Forum members are leaders in clean diesel technology and represent the three key elements of the modern clean-diesel system: advanced engines, vehicles and equipment, cleaner diesel fuel and emissions-control systems. For more information visit www.dieselforum.org.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 100 Comments
      Wisdom Seeker
      • 2 Years Ago
      The more modern diesels that are made available - the more Americans will discover their benefits. The driver's choice for fuel economy. It's good for consumers to have the option.
        over9000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Wisdom Seeker
        holie crap, there are so many uninformed posters here. Diesel vehicles are MUCH MORE EXPENSIVE than their gasoline model equivalents. Expensive to produce, maintain, and buy. All of that negates the fuel consumption advantage.
      emperor koku
      • 2 Years Ago
      I don't see why it's always hybrids VERSUS diesels. Isn't there room in the market for both? One of my relatives owns a Prius. All she does is city driving, all day long. It's better for her use than a TDI, since she's averaging about 50mpg city. CHOICE! It's what makes the free market great.
      palmerbeepee
      • 2 Years Ago
      BTW - someone tell me how we go from 60 cents p/gal LESS expensive than "reg/unleaded", to 60 cents p/gal MORE expenseive than "prem/unleaded", without some HEAVY MANIPULATION? And those differences are not on a % basis. In other words: in up-state N.Y., at the highest of pricing (about two years ago) Diesel was @ $5.69 and premium unleaded was $5.19. Several months before: Diesel was $3.89 and premium unleaded was $3.29 - that's a clear indication that, the cost of production being the same, the increase was not based on the cost of production, but an arbitrary (imaginary) number.
        dreadcthulhu01
        • 2 Years Ago
        @palmerbeepee
        The biggest reason why diesel jumped over gasoline in price is that the US switched Ultra Low-Sulfur Diesel in late 2006; which dropped the allowable amount of sulfur in diesel fuel from 500 ppm to 15 ppm. This was done to improve air quality. It also moved US fuel specs closer to European ones, which, IIRC allow 10 ppm of sulfur, so this wasn't an anti-diesel move by itself - we all know diesel cars sell well enough in Europe. Of course, European countries have other regulations that encourage diesel use in passenger vehicles, like much laxer NOX emissions standards for diesels, and many European countries tax diesel a lot less, making it cheaper at the pump. Producing ULSD requires more complicated and energy intensive refining processes, as well as needing lower sulfur crude oil to begin with. And converting refineries to make it did cost a prettty penny, which is still being amortized. That explains most of the price increase.
          palmerbeepee
          • 2 Years Ago
          @dreadcthulhu01
          Just read your comment, thanks. Next question: how far flung is a "National" veggie fuel agenda (remembering that I'm a "National Water Reclamation" , i.e. the Bureau of Reclamation, and Army Corps of Engineers) advocate. Also given that we have put a man on the moon, and we completed the Black Bird project? Am I that loopy, to think that it can be done? Side Bar: I was just thinking off the top of my head - the diesel engine is the most significant worldwide invention, NOT originated in the U.S. - just as lowering the national speed limit to 55mpg (in order to save fuel) was the most significant law EVER passed (in terms of "lives saved" p/yr. (+4,000 in today's world, a few hundred during the "strict enforcement" days of 55mpg).
          palmerbeepee
          • 2 Years Ago
          @dreadcthulhu01
          Because "fuel" has become AS IMPORTANT as "water", "free enterprise" must be taken out of the equation. The Reclamation Act took free enterprise out of water and established water “authorities” that are still in power today on a nationwide basis. I advocate an entirely NEW agricultural/industrial effort (structured along the lines of The Reclamation Act) using vast lands that are not in use. Different crops would be chosen geographically, and irrigation would be a must. New dams, canals and turn-outs would not affect existing water treatment and some low voltage hydro-electric plants (forming a new concept in a DC/Solar grid) could be incorporated to accommodate both the water conveyance and the oil extraction process. Based upon the soy bean numbers, this would require a new diversified crop yield, 200 x the existing soy bean figures. There would be zero dependence on petroleum to produce any phase of the new veggie fuel system.
      Scott
      • 2 Years Ago
      RUG - $3.33 Diesel - $3.85 TDI JSW running about 35 mpg average around town with gasser rated at 25. Cost per 1000 miles: RUG - $133.20 (13 cents per mile) Diesel - $110.11 (11 cents per mile) Diesel would have to run $4.66 to make it less economical than rug.
      Andre Neves
      • 2 Years Ago
      In other news, Common sense is up 27% while stupidity shrinks.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      godwhomismike
      • 2 Years Ago
      While diesel fuel prices are terrible, the excellent fuel economy and huge amounts of low end torque in my opinion make them more desirable than a hybrid. I want to climb up steep roads with authority, not hear an engine trashing and groaning while it's losing speed and struggling up steep grades. Now, the issue for me is that no one offers a diesel vehicle in the US under $30K that has AWD.
        Jim Gorde
        • 2 Years Ago
        @godwhomismike
        Completely agree. It's not just about fuel economy, that low end torque and drivability make all the difference. Well put. Besides, a 3.0L V6 diesel makes as much torque as a 6.0L V8 gasoline engine. Horsepower only does duty at the top end of the rev range. About time diesel started to shine over rubbish hybrids.
        ojfltx
        • 2 Years Ago
        @godwhomismike
        I am with you on this godwhomismike. I would rather have a diesel than a hybrid too.
        over9000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @godwhomismike
        You know what I don't like about diesel vehicles? Their high price and maintenance costs.
      David G.
      • 2 Years Ago
      Thank you America! Now how about a diesel Jeep Wrangler?!
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        Zoom
        • 2 Years Ago
        link to evidence please.
          dukeisduke
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Zoom
          Sorry, I thought you meant about the sales increases/decreases). If you're talking about "electromagnetic effects" and health, that was was one crank scientist, who's been discredited.
          dukeisduke
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Zoom
          Read the first paragraph, and the news release. The rest you can Google.
      dreadcthulhu01
      • 2 Years Ago
      If any significant portion of the US population switched from gasoline to diesel vehicles, it would drive up the price of diesel fuel to the point where it doesn't make any economic sense over gasoline. Already, diesel is close to that point, in the US; a diesel car typically gets 30% better mileage than a comparable gasoline car, and diesel fuel is already ~15% more expensive than gasoline; factor in the greater cost a diesel engine and the more complicated emissions control system, and it takes a long time for them to break even cost wise right now; longer than many hybrids. Diesel do have some other merits, like lots of low end torque, that make them well suited to vehicles that will end up doing a lot of towing, like pick-ups and certain SUVs, but overall I think hybrids, or just smaller turbo-charged gasoline engines make more sense for most passenger cars. And diesels are just dirtier than gasoline engines, so as long as we let California (and other states following them) make its own air quality laws, that will put a crimp on manufactors selling them in the US, since Californians don't understand the law of diminishing returns when it comes to environmental regulations. World-wide, diesel cars are only popular in countries that rig their laws to favor them (Euro emissions laws let diesel produce 3 times more NOX than gasoline cars, many countries tax diesel a lot less than gasoline, so diesel fuel ends up being cheaper at the pump, while the US taxes diesel slightly more than gasoline, 5 cents or so a gallon more, depending on the state). You don't see the Chinese or Japanese (to name two large car markets) buying many diesels, either, since their governments don't artificially encourage them.
        Lastchance
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dreadcthulhu01
        You sum up nicely the reasons diesel cars are not popular in the US. The main deterrent is strict state emission test.
      mufpixtintrix
      • 2 Years Ago
      How long does it take automakers to understand that North Americans like diesel engines? Bring us diesel engines, in various vehicle platforms, and we'll buy them. I really hope they don't label us as gasoline-thirsty monsters. Still waiting on news about that next-gen Nissan Titan, with a 4-cylindar Cummins engine. Interested buyer here is waiting patiently...
        palmerbeepee
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mufpixtintrix
        Funny you should mention - about 8 years ago, the Japanese were starting to produce extremely small diesels (from weed wackers to lawn mowers). Imagine your lawn mower lasting as long a farmer's tractor. I think the VW Golf diesel hybrid's engine is smaller than their 1.8 L that's in their diesel Jetta. Also the in-line technology can give you 3 or 5 cylinders (of course without spark plugs). Of course the Golf get 79 mpg city.
        baconbaconbacon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mufpixtintrix
        I'm with you. We bought our 2011 QX56 August last year and Infiniti invited me to take part in their Early Buyer Study Interview, which I gladly accepted. I sat down with them and explained that, despite the great job they did with the new V8, I would have gladly paid $1000-1500 more for a diesel. The other side of the table looked at me like a confused puppy. Like DRstrangelove says below...don't hold your breath.
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mufpixtintrix
        [blocked]
        over9000
        • 2 Years Ago
        @mufpixtintrix
        diesel engines are much more complicated to design, manufacture, and maintain. The car manufacturers don't like diesel engines for that reason.
          montoym
          • 2 Years Ago
          @over9000
          Plenty of manufacturers design and manufacturer diesels. I see no manufacturers that are flatly against them, especially not for the reasons you stated. I think what you meant to say was that those manufacturers by and large don't offer their diesels in the US. Prime reason for that, the differing emissions regulations between the US and the rest of the World. Make the standards the same (or much closer) and we'd see a ton more diesels offered here.
      BlackDynamiteOn
      • 2 Years Ago
      Pretty misleading using last year's numbers, since many popular Japanese hybrids lost sales due to supply issues from the tsunami BD
    • Load More Comments