The 2013 Dodge Dart is Chrysler's first serious attempt at a compact sedan since the Neon, and Team Pentastar appears to be going all out. We were especially interested in getting a first-hand look at the automaker's new infotainment system, and its interesting take on a next-generation instrument panel. The gauge cluster is powered by a seven-inch Thin Film Transistor (TFT) display that enables the driver to customize the interface to his or her desire, and appears to be simple and intuitive to operate.

Dodge Communications representative Kathy Graham was nice enough to give us a quick walkthrough of the cutting-age tech, and we have the video to prove it. Hit the jump to watch the Autoblog Short Cut.



I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 88 Comments
      leunamme
      • 2 Years Ago
      my dad's S-class has a similar set up, but this is even cooler. It may seem gimmicky, but it's actually really useful. This is definitely some trickle down progress for the compact segment.
      Leather Bear
      • 2 Years Ago
      The customization is fine as far the video demo goes, but there's one glaring fault (and it's not exclusive to the Dart IP): WHERE'S MY COOLANT TEMP GAUGE?!?! A red "overheat" idiot light (along with a blue "cold" idiot light in some cases) is a poor substitute.
        d317
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Leather Bear
        There is a coolant gauge... don't worry.
        Bret Frohwein
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Leather Bear
        I'm so glad someone else noticed that little tidbit.. :)
      carguy23dt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Seems like Dodge is trying to be a tech leader, in terms of availability in vehicles.
      tkosoccer03
      • 2 Years Ago
      overall, very cool stuff. i think the new dart has potential to take over the segment provided it's marketed well and effectively.
      tipdrip215
      • 2 Years Ago
      Fancy. Chrysler really has a home run on their hands with the Dart.
        Rob
        • 2 Years Ago
        @tipdrip215
        Wow, can we wait to see what it drives like and the reliability first?
      Aki. I
      • 2 Years Ago
      wow, they've logged over 12k miles on that demo unit already.
      rem
      • 2 Years Ago
      Is this gauge package standard? I only see it listed on limited and r/t models on Dodge's website.
        sirjaysmith
        • 2 Years Ago
        @rem
        its optional. Standard equipment is an old fashioned analog cluster.
      Patrick Clark
      • 2 Years Ago
      lmfao!!!! KATHY GRIFFIN?!!
      Hellevectia
      • 2 Years Ago
      I used to think the Fiesta was the all time best compact, but then I took a Dart to the knee. Seriously, this is one great looking car.
      Fat Stig
      • 2 Years Ago
      Lets get some misconceptions out of the way: Digital guages are not less accurate than analog, they are not more prone to breaking, and they will not need replacing. Modern analog gauges are controlled electronically just like these. But because its analog you introduce things like motors and gears and calibration, all of which can screw up. Ever been in an old car where the needle has worn out and is just bouncing around? Theres no moving parts on an LCD screen to fail. Analog gauges are EXTREMELY inaccurate (outside of professional ones, the one in your ford focus is not professional), this should be common knowledge. Digital gauges display exactly what the computer feeds them and can update in around .05ms. The Lexus LFA opted for digital to show the exact revs in realtime, something impossible for analog. There is no moving part to get in the way between the speed sensor and the display, it shows exactly what the speed sensor is reporting. LCD's last upwards of 100,000 hours, if you drive a few hours a day thats over 90 years. Even if you sat in your car for most of the day it will still outlast the engine. To think the LCD will need replacing in a car is insane.
        gochu
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Fat Stig
        haha lcds dont just die like a bulb... its the CCFL or lamp that will slowly degrade with time. Some define end of life when the lamp hits 50% of its output. for an example, think of ur computer monitors. after about 3 to 4 years the brightness will be lower. (well this depends on how bright you use ur monitor tho) problem w lcd gauges are, that they need to be bright in case the sun hits the panel thus shortening the life span. if you truly believe that you can use the lcd screen for over 90 years.......well, im not going to be mean, ill just stop here. but please do some research before saying something stupid like this. high end cars can use lcd gauges cause they use better bulb(lit system) for the lcd(hey, you are paying a **** load of money for the car), but for cheap or average cars its a different story.
          Jason
          • 2 Years Ago
          @gochu
          Hence why many LCDs are LED edge-lit or backlit, with edge-lit being popular to reduce packaging size. Many CCFLs are rated for 60,000-100,000 hours (to half brightness), while many LEDs exceed 100,000 hours. Either way, you'll probably end up with dead pixels or some other partial failure before the backlight output becomes an issue. Many new analog gauges are also using LEDs as their light source.
          kingrat001
          • 2 Years Ago
          @gochu
          I have LEDs that are well over 40 years old and they still work fine. One of them was on for nearly 30 years 24/7, and it still is working. I made a little power supply and bought a pack of assorted LEDs at Radio shack about 1968 or so.
        ben5017
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Fat Stig
        Sure, the touch screens and digital dashs have been great for the dealerships since they have come out and I would take any analog dash over a digital for the lower cost of maintenance over the life of owning the car. Today's electronics in cars are supplied by the lowest bidder and within a year one might find many suppliers of the same part with possibly different wiring or software to deal with which means higher costs to the owner. You might love techno-gadgets, but the touch screens and digital displays should be kept to low end electronics you can throw away and replace without the price of a car loan!
      anonymous guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      It's a Daj Dart.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Shiftright
        • 2 Years Ago
        Ahhh, the armchair quarterbacks who regale in cheap shots at anyone succeeding or God forbid trying something new and you know, being innovative. Those TPS reports have mad you bitter
    • Load More Comments